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Views on The Role of Public Opinion

The constitution in America has been changed with regards to the public opinion-related parts and stated, echoing the founding fathers, that the public in the modern world, due to the complexity of the modern world, are not interested in political issues, and are particularly ignorant of matters they do not have experience with, specially foreign affairs.

According to Walter Lippmann, an American sociologist, ordinary people working only, with what he named, stereotypes are not capable of understanding politics. Which is quiet a discriminative theory.

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People understand their needs, their wants, and their needs for well-being; those should be the only policy and are the sole fundamentals of political economy. Politicians should not care about investment and whatever else. They should only care about the well-being of the peoples. That is why governments should be elected from the people, and by the people here I mean the working class.

Because the working class is the core of the society, and the vast majority of the population. And without whom the rest of the population would not feed, dress, or even be able to work on the streets. Without the proletarians, all the capitalists’ farms, factories, businesses would stop and get bankrupt. And eventually people would starve if the proletarians stopped working. Imagine the mass of efficiency the proletarians have on any society. In conclusion, since the efficiency of the proletariat has been displayed, technocracy and popular governments is the answer opposing Lippmann’s theory.

Lippmann added that the primary problem of popular governments is that the members are always violently prejudging matters, apathy, and preference curious trivial and dull important matters, and are hungry for side shows and three legged calves. And that even if they improved their characters they would not be of any aid to the governments because they do not spend enough time to study political issues they do not know about. And as if though Lippmann considers academic politicians live in another world or come from another planet, he continues to under-estimate the masses and the populace.

And goes on even further and calls the masses shallow minded and think of unimportant matters. And that actually is the problem; Lippmann thinks that rational and educated peoples should be standing amongst noble and aristocratic ruling class. Meanwhile, what we think is that they should be standing amongst the working class, supporting them with their knowledge and rationalism, against the government in their decisions that increases the suffering of the working class or the poor class, supporting the government when they work on the decreasing of such pains and sufferings.

It would be a lot easier this way. While as matter of fact, technocratic governments would only think of making the average citizen’s life easier, because they, themselves, have suffered the everyday, equally as the average citizen before, and while, being in office. It would be a lot easier. Collaboration between the government and the people would be at its upmost.