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The Professional Project Handbook and Guidance Booklet

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Professional Project Handbook and Guidance 2011/12 The Professional Project Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 2 The Professional Project Foreword Please may I extend a warm welcome to those students studying the Professional Project (PP). We intend the Project to be a rewarding experience and one which encourages and supports you in your time at Newcastle Business School. This is a demanding element of your programme but one which we hope you will find engaging and helps focus on your future career. Wishing you well in your studies.

Regards Dr. Simon Lillystone Module Tutor NX0315 – The Professional Project Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 3 The Professional Project Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 4 The Professional Project CONTENTS PAGE Page SECTION 1 - Introduction 7 SECTION 2 - Section A of Project 10 SECTION 3 - Section B of Project 11 SECTION 4 - Reflective Statement 12 SECTION 5 - Written Presentation Format 13 SECTION 6 - Reference Specifications and Format 18 SECTION 7 - Project Submission Information 20 APPENDIX A - Specimen Title page 3 APPENDIX B - Specimen Declarations Page 22 APPENDIX C - Specimen Contents Page 24 APPENDIX D - Ethics in Research & Consultancy (Guidelines & Procedures for Students Undertaking UG Projects) 25 Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 5 The Professional Project Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 6 The Professional Project SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION Module Background Information The Professional Project is a 30 point module which will be taken by all direct entry final year students to an undergraduate programme of study at NBS.

It counts for 25% of the marks on the final year of the Honours degree and its importance should not be underestimated. The module provides an opportunity to explore the key study competences required to achieve academic success and develop these into employment competences to promote career success. These competences will be developed, practised and written up as part of the Project and applied to an investigation of a business issue/problem. To support this individual investigation into an applied business problem or issue the student will be given a defined topic to research and relevant information relating to the topic.

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The information will be set in the context of an appropriate academic framework and the student will be expected to draw relevant conclusions, write up and submit the work in an approved format. The target length of the whole project will be 8,000 to 10,000 words. A workshop programme and eLearning Portal will support the process. Learning Outcomes This module is intended to be taken by direct entry final year students to an undergraduate programme of study at NBS. At the end of the module students will be able to: 1.

Apply key intellectual competences at level six and critically appraise their employment competences to support continuing professional/career development 2. Conduct a literature review involving the critical evaluation of appropriate theories, models, frameworks and principles and apply those principles to a particular business problem or issue drawing appropriate inferences and conclusions. Aims The Professional Project promotes the development of key competences required to achieve academic and professional career success.

These competences will be developed, practised, written up and applied to an investigation of a business issue/problem. The student will be supported in their learning by an eLearning Portal and a workshop programme. The student will be given guidance as to the nature of work to be undertaken in the workshop programme. The module will make use of current research activity related to the chosen subject and, where appropriate, to that specifically carried out by staff of Newcastle Business School.

Formative assessment will take place within the contact sessions and may take place through tasks set and theory/practice related discussions including Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 7 The Professional Project research into career paths. Approaches to Teaching and Learning and Formative Assessment The module is intended to deliver knowledge of and attendance to the competences and abilities for effective study at level six together with entry to and participation within the graduate labour market.

It provides an opportunity to undertake a major piece of academic research into a specific business related problem. The module necessitates a broad syllabus where much use will be made of directed study supported by the facilities of the Careers Service, Study Skills Centre and Library. This approach will facilitate the development of students as independent learners. The creation of Learning Sets will be encouraged to facilitate understanding of the issues and problems associated with the completion of the project. The process leading to the completion of the project will include reading, reflection and research.

This will be incorporated into the workshop programme which will support the student throughout the process. It is intended that the project will be closely allied to their preferred field of employment. Through the project and workshop activities it is envisaged that students will appreciate the importance of active engagement in competences and career development to improve NBS graduate success in securing appropriate careers or future study opportunities The module is supported by a Learning and Teaching Plan that outlines the formal sessions and by an elearning Portal.

The assessment for this module will be an individual project, incorporating the writing up of the student's understanding of personal and professional competence development and an investigation into an applied business problem or issue. The student will be given a defined topic to research and relevant information relating to the topic. The information will be set in the context of an appropriate academic framework and the student will be expected to draw relevant conclusions, write up and submit the work in an approved format. The target length of the whole project will be 8,000 to 10,000 words.

The learning outcomes will be achieved through the lecture/workshop programme and will culminate in the completion of the final project. The project will demonstrate the student's understanding of the above learning outcomes. Formative assessment will take place within the workshop sessions and may take place through tasks set and theory/practice related discussions. Workshop Support Programme This is a taught programme with weekly workshops during the first semester followed by six workshops in the second semester. The Project will not be individually supervised. Instead the students will be expected to work in learning sets.

However, it must be noted that the final project is to be an individual piece of work. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 8 The Professional Project Recommended Reading List for Module Cottrell, S (2008) The Study Skills Handbook 3rd Edn Palgrave MacMillan Basingstoke Armstrong (2005) A Handbook for Leadership and Management: a guide to managing for results. Kogan London Toplis, J. Dulewicz, V. and Fletcher, W. (2005) Psychological Testing – a Manager's guide. CIPD London Cameron (2007) The Business Student's Handbook: learning skills for study and employment (available as an e-book) Bolles, RN (2008) What colour is your parachute?

A practical manual for job hunters. Ten Speed Publishing Walliman, N (2001) Your Research Project Sage Publications Bell, J (2005) Doing your research project Open University Press Cottrell, S. (2008) Critical Thinking Skills Palgrave Basingstoke Jankowicz,A. D (2005) Business Research Projects Thompson Business Press Remenyi,D, Williams,B, Money,A & Swatz,E (2007) Doing Research in Business and Management Sage Publications Bryman,A & Bell E (2003) Business Research Methods Oxford University Press Price, G. & Maier, P. (2007) Effective Study skills – unlock your potential. Pearson Education McMillan, K. Weyers, J. (2009) The Smarter Student Prentice Hall / Pearson London McMillan, K. & Weyers, J. (2007) How to write dissertations & project reports Prentice Hall/ Pearson London Additional Learning Resources (e. g. websites, CD Roms) Blackboard Site The module is supported by the e-learning portal. It is imperative that the site is fully utilised by the students. Certain links to psychological tests are available under the site which will be used to support the learning process. eLearning platform at Northumbria http://elearning. unn. ac. uk/ Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 9

The Professional Project SECTION 2 – SECTION A OF THE PROJECT The Project is intended to link personal and professional career development with an academic piece of work in the form of a literature review. The appreciation of professional, career and personal development should not be underestimated. It should provide evidence to support that development with critical reflection by the student. A series of psychometric tests are available via BlackBoard to support your self-analysis. The outline of Section A of the project should take the form seen below with supporting evidence shown in the appendices.

Part 1: Who I am as a learner? • • Implications for your learning Family & friends to comment Discuss the implications of the questionnaire findings and show how these relate to how you learn. Appendix A – VARK, Myers Briggs, Belbin Inventory Part 2: Implications for career choice • • • Lifelong learning Transferable skills Justify chosen career choice Discuss how your personality type and how you learn affect your choice of career Appendix B – curriculum vitae, two job adverts, a standard application form Appendix C – PowerPoint Presentation Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12

Page 10 The Professional Project SECTION 3 – TOPIC SELECTION (SECTION B) General topic areas will be defined by the nature of the programme e. g. , those students studying finance would be expected to focus their topic on this area. However, the selection of a final suitable question or issue for Section B of the Project rests with the student. In some cases ideas can be gleaned from many sources. Work placement experiences, aspired career paths, tutor research interests, course work and readings are just a few. Copies of recent projects may suggest ideas as well.

Normally projects that are available for inspection have achieved a mark of 60% or more. It is intended that suitable projects will be made available on the Blackboard site. Originality The question or issue needs to be related to business or management or to the specific named degree the student is studying. It is the student's responsibility to verify that the title and the approach of the project are original. However, a student may not claim exclusive rights to a topic area. Guidelines for Suitable Questions The student can assume that the question as initially conceived will evolve as the project progresses.

By evolve it is meant that the particular aspect of the question which becomes centred to the project may well change in one direction or another as the project progresses. This evolution or “fine tuning” of a question is quite usual and should be expected. The goal is to find a question which is general enough to be significant, but specific enough to become focused. In any event, the final title as established should not be changed without consent of the Project Supervisor. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 11 The Professional Project SECTION 4 - REFLECTIVE STATEMENT

A vital element of the project is critical reflection by the student. It is important therefore to produce a reflective statement which will link the two sections of the project together. This is a very important area of the project and should be a considered and well thought out element of the final piece of work. The workshops will provide guidance and support on critical reflection as part of the programme. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 12 The Professional Project SECTION 5 - WRITTEN PRESENTATION FORMAT Length The total length of the project should not exceed 10,000 words.

As a general guide Section A of the project should be between 3,000 and 4,000 words while Section B of the project should be between 5,000 and 6,000 words. The word count is to be declared (Appendix B). Summarising and compressing the information in your project into 10,000 words is one of the skills that students are expected to acquire, and demonstrate as part of the project process. The word count does not include abstract, title page, contents page, glossary, tables, appendices and end material. If the project is to be very much shorter (i. e. ess than 8,000 words), it is necessary to clear this in advance of the final deadline with your tutor. Some slippage is acceptable but anything in excess of 11,000 words will be penalised. Referencing It is the student's responsibility to see to it that all ideas, opinions, conclusions, specific wordings, quotations, conceptual structures and data taken directly or indirectly from the work of others and used in the project are appropriately cited and referenced. (THE IMPORTANCE OF PROPER REFERENCING – SEE SECTION 7 – CANNOT BE OVER EMPHASISED). Structure and Components

TABLE OF CONTENTS Title page Declaration and Word Count Abstract (to cover both sections) Acknowledgements Contents Page List of figures Glossary (if appropriate) Section A Part 1: Who I am as a learner? Implications for your learning Family & friends to comment Part 2: Implications for career choice Lifelong learning Transferable skills Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 13 The Professional Project Justify chosen career choice Appendix A – VARK, Myers Briggs, Belbin Inventory Appendix B – Curriculum vitae, two job adverts, a standard application form Appendix C – PowerPoint Presentation Section B

Part 1 Introduction Reason for choice of topic Academic objectives of Project Outline of sections Part 2 Setting the Scene – (if required) Part 3 Literature Review Rationale for literature reviewed Critical review of literature relating to academic objectives Part 4 References Bibliography Appendices A B C Reflective Statement Last Page o o It is useful to specify the last page so that the reader may ensure that no pages have been omitted in error. Summary and Conclusions Title - The title should be succinct yet clearly specify the content of the report. This should be descriptive and explicit rather than poetic or implicit.

Twelve words is normally the maximum length. It should be agreed and finalised as part of the final draft. It may be different from the original proposed title. Acknowledgements - The student may wish to thank those people who have been particularly helpful in the preparation of the project. Consideration of persons external to the NBS is particularly appropriate. Facetious acknowledgements are not acceptable. Abstract - The purpose of the abstract is to summarise the entire project, including a description of the problem, the student's contributions, and conclusions.

Four keywords are required. (See sample Appendix C. ) Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 14 The Professional Project Declarations and Word Count - To be included (See sample Appendix B). Do not forget to sign. No signature: No Mark. Introduction - The purpose of this section is to contextualise the study. This means that the significance or importance of the subject is set out. If there is no apparent importance to the study to any external reader, the topic may not be appropriate. Personal interest may inspire selection of the project topic, but ultimately, its mportance to others should be specified. This can often be done by positioning the project in relation to other work that has been published, either as an advancement, continuation, compilation or verification. This part should also tell the reader how the topic will be unfolded and the order of forthcoming material. Literature Review – A review of the current literature surrounding the question or issue should provide a clear understanding. It should be up-to-date and relevant. Conclusion - This section explains the relationship between the body of knowledge and the question.

It should present the case for the project's success in meeting its goals, as well as any shortcomings and limitations that apply. It may suggest further work or study needed on the question or issue, as well as ways the new work can be used or applied in other cases. It is not meant to be a summary or restatement of the entire project, which belongs in the abstract. If the student has developed any strong personal opinions about the subject which seem appropriate to relate, this is the place where such content is appropriate.

Appendices - Often the concepts of the study can be clarified in graphic form, or data presented in tabular form. Normally, this material should be entered into the text at or near the place it is referred to in the text. Where such material would be inconvenient to include in the text itself, it can be included in an appendix. As a general rule, if figures, tables, charts or quotes are less than a full page and can be conveniently included in the text, you will want to do so, since reference to appendices is awkward for the reader.

All such material, in the text or at the end, should be titled and sequentially numbered. Tabular material which is presented in landscape format should be bound with the top of the table to the spine. Appendices are labelled alphabetically, although if there is little such material and it is all of a similar nature, it may all be included in one Appendix. Appendices are referenced in text in parentheses (Appendix A) not (see appendix A). Writing Style The level of writing must be appropriate to the level of the Bachelor's degree.

Specifically, acute attention should be paid to correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure and clarity of style. Also, it is the student's responsibility to edit the text for typing errors, uncover all spelling errors even if the document is, typed by another party. Note that a spell-check programme does not uncover all spelling errors, e. g. principal v principle. Normally, there should be no first person references (I, we, us) in Section B of the project. If self-reference is required, reference may be made to "the present author" Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 15

The Professional Project or "this study". The exception to this is in the conclusion section B and Section A, where personal comments may be appropriate. Students from overseas who wish to develop their English style and grammar may wish to make use of the Study Skills Centre. Page Layout Pages should be numbered in sequence at the top right hand corner, starting with and including the title page (Appendix A). Margins and headings: the specifications are 1? " left margin, 1? " on the other three sides. The page number should be above the top margin line.

The right margin should be unjustified (left ragged), since the spacing between words used to make the right margin even inhibits readability greatly, while adding little aesthetically. Headers and footers are to be used with discretion. Please do NOT include your name in any header or footer. Tables and charts should be numbered in sequence by chapter, e. g. Table 3. 1 is the first table in Chapter 3. Each figure should be properly referenced and accompanied by a descriptive title which completely explains the contents of the figure.

It is not acceptable to insert photocopies of tables into the body of the project. Tables should be word processed into the project. In broad terms this principle also applies to diagrams – no photocopies from books etc. There will, of course, be occasions when a photocopy of a table or a diagram is specifically required in order to illustrate points peculiar to the original. Use of such photocopies must be cleared with the supervisor. Similar principles apply to the appendices with regard to tables and diagrams. It is recognised that there will be circumstances (e. . a project on advertising) where photocopies are necessary. The project must be word-processed, and final copy must be printed single sided on A4 paper. Spacing may either be set at double or one and a half line spacing, depending on the machine used. Spacing greater than double spacing is not acceptable. The body of the project should be in Font size 12 (This is written Font Size 12) or similar. Arial is the preferred font face. Legibility Both the draft and final copies of the project must be produced in such a manner that the text is entirely legible.

This means an image suitable for good reproduction from a photocopier. Colour Printing Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 16 The Professional Project Black printing is the norm. Colour printing must be used with discretion. There are no extra marks for colour. The University makes no guarantee as to the provision of colour printing facilities. Retention of Working Papers The working documents (e. g. notes, any photocopies of articles used, drafts etc) used for your project MUST be retained by the student until formally notified of the award of their degree.

As part of the NBS quality control a stratified sample of students will be asked by letter (after projects have been handed in) to submit their working papers. Please ensure you keep you working papers so that if called for they can be produced. The University tries to be reasonable over this. We do not expect you to keep every scrap of paper. We do expect you to keep the bulk of the important working papers. Thus students would normally (for example) be expected to include in their working papers some (but not necessarily all) successive drafts of the project.

Any photocopies of library material etc you use should also be kept. Working Papers MUST be accessible. i. e. DO NOT pack them away in some inaccessible place such as luggage you are shipping home. If your project includes calculations, the working papers for those would be expected. And if your project includes a survey or questionnaire the original papers for those should be kept - along with names and addresses of any firms or individuals involved. Keep all computer based material in digital format, CD, etc. Production of “working papers” includes being able to produce the discs. Do not keep material on the hard drive.

Failure to produce working papers when requested by the University to do so constitutes an Academic Irregularity, which may adversely affect the awarding of the students' degree. If it is not possible to establish, by inspection of the working papers, the sources of material in the project the award of the degree will be delayed until the matter is resolved. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 17 The Professional Project SECTION 6 REFERENCE SPECIFICATIONS AND FORMAT Plagiarism and Citation The intellectual work of others which is being summarised in the report must be attributed to its source.

It is assumed that all ideas, opinions, conclusions, specific wordings, quotations, conceptual structures and data, whether reproduced exactly or in paraphrase, which are not referenced to another source is the work of the student. If this is not the case, an act of plagiarism may have occurred, which is cause for disciplinary action at the course or University level. Plagiarism Please pay particular attention to originality and the proper acknowledgement of your sources.

It is important that the work you submit: • Is original in as far as the Project constraints allow • Gives proper acknowledgement to any work by others which is used in completing your project Originality means that the project subject is presented in a way which differs from any other: • Published works • Study guides • Projects/Projects of other students, past or present This does not preclude the use of the same material from wider reading (to support it with examples, or relevant opinions and ideas, or to place it within the context of existing knowledge).

In fact, credit is specifically given for references in the assessment scheme. It does mean, however, that the sources of any such material MUST be identified. You should ensure that: • Words or phrases taken verbatim from published works are placed in quotation marks and the source acknowledged. • Quotations take the form of brief relevant extracts (only exceptionally exceeding 100 words in length). Where lengthier use of a published work is appropriate, you may summarise or paraphrase an author’s words, but the source of the summary or paraphrase must again be fully acknowledged by textual reference.

Unacknowledged use of the work of others (plagiarism) is regarded as dishonest practice and will be dealt with on that basis, as per the University’s Regulations. Format in Text The format for reference styles is laid out in the Northumbria University Library publication Cite Them Right and is available on the UNN Website. Two styles of Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 18 The Professional Project referencing are defined, the British Standard (Numeric) System and the Harvard System. Please use the Harvard System for your project.

A comprehensive discussion on referencing is laid out in the library's publication, which must be followed in detail. The following is a brief sample for illustration only: The Harvard (Name/Date) System uses name and year in text, e. g. According to Steinman (2003) there are three parts... or A recent study (Steinman 2003) states there are three parts... Direct quotes should have author, year and page number. This should be done as (Steinman, 2003:6) or Steinman (2003:6). If a quote crosses over pages you would write (Steinman, 2003:6-7).

The purpose of the page reference is to enable the reader to find easily your source material. Particular points should also have page references whereas general themes from a complete article do not require the precise page number. Format in References Section The Harvard (Name/Date) System is listed at the end of the text in alphabetical order by author and date, e. g. Lafferty, B. A and Hult, M. T. (2001) A Synthesis of Contemporary Market Orientation Perspectives, European Journal of Marketing. Vol. 35:no. 12:pp. 2-109 Full specifications and examples are illustrated in the library's monograph. Referencing Electronic sources: e. g. from the World Wide Web should be as follows: PC MAGAZINE. URL: http//www. ziff. com/~ PC Mag/(date of downloading/viewing) (Name, Date (of article), Title) (i. e. as well as any date attached to a document on the web, electronic references should also include the date on which the web was read for the particular source). The citation for non English works should follow the same order as English works. For books: author, date, title of book, publisher.

For articles: author, date, title of article, title of journal, volume and page numbers. Further details for other electronic referencing are in the Library's monograph "Cite them Right" Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 19 The Professional Project SECTION 7 - PROJECT SUBMISSION INFORMATION Projects are to be submitted to SHAPE UNN Office (room 309C) by no later than 4. 00 PM Friday 23rd March 2012. You must NOT exceed the deadlines given without an approved PEC. In exceptional circumstances late submission of the Project, up to a maximum of 2 weeks, may be sought.

These must be approved in advance, with appropriate evidence, and are not meant to cover administrative difficulties. INCLUSION OF A DISK COPY OF THE PROJECT THREE CDs containing a complete copy of the body of the Project (appendices may be omitted as may diagrams within the body of the Project) is to be submitted along with the Project. The title page of the Project must be the first page on the disk. Non submission of a disk, or submission of a corrupt or blank disk will be regarded as an Academic Irregularity.

Computer programmes are available which detect changes in grammar and style. The University uses such programmes as an aid in detecting plagiarism. Evidence from such programmes will be used in any disciplinary action taken by the University in cases of alleged plagiarism. Confidentiality This is regarded as an exceptional procedure and this must be agreed by the Tutor [who must be asked to the confidentiality form available on the blackboard site] and declared by the student to Reception on submission. The confidential Project will be pulped.

If the confidentiality form is not submitted at hand in the Project will be regarded as non-confidential. It would be prudent to also state that the Project is confidential in footer on each page of the Project. Binding Requirements for Undergraduate Projects All Projects are bound in standard Business School covers. Students are required to submit TWO copies of the completed project. Newcastle Campus Projects submitted at Newcastle campus are submitted bound in standard Business School format. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 20 The Professional Project

Please note the Declarations statement must be signed and all pages in the correct order before taking the copies of the Project for binding. The procedure is: • • • Pick up binding materials from SHAPE UNN office. Take the binded copies and CDs along to SHAPE UNN office by no later than 4. 00 pm on or before your hand in date with your Disc. Sign on the submission log sheet at the Reception to signify you had submitted the Project on time. Failed Projects A failed Project may or may not, depending upon the student's overall performance, be re-submitted.

That decision is made by the Examination Board. If a student's performance merits a re-submitted Project according to the assessment regulations such that it would enable a student to improve upon the class of degree awarded the University (i. e. Examination Board) will invite the student to re-submit their Project. The student may accept or reject this offer. The Examination Board may direct that a new and unrelated topic be investigated. Any student whose Project falls into this category is so advised via the standard University Examination results letter sent at the end of the summer term.

That letter will state whether re-submission is invited or not. Re-submitted Projects are submitted following the same process as described for first submission. The fees payable will be notified to students in their offer to retrieve and students should note that they will need to pay for the binding of this resubmission. Supervision is limited to one 20 minute meeting with the original tutor who will review the problems with the original submission. Mark Disclosure It is impossible for the prospective mark which a Project might achieve to be accurately estimated before a Project is formally marked.

Every Project is marked and a sample is moderated. Some are marked a third (or more) time(s) either by External or Internal Examiners. The mark attached to a Project is a result of this process. It is therefore simply not possible for a tutor to give a definitive view as to exactly what standard a Project might reach. This does not, of course, preclude a tutor giving general guidance as to the calibre of the students work, but such guidance should be given and taken with due consideration to the above and can not be considered a binding assurance .

Students will receive a copy of the completed assessment sheet following the conclusion of the examination boards. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 21 The Professional Project APPENDIX A Proforma Note: This information must fit within the outline shown so that it will be visible through the window in the front cover. Please ensure your family name is in BLOCK CAPITALS NAME This is the position of the window in the front cover sheet Thomas JONES BA (Hons) Business Administration Helen Smith The Ethics of Advertising April 2009 Newcastle

DEGREE TUTOR TITLE DATE O CAMPUS STUDENT No: 00/123456 Project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the BA (HONS) BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION of Northumbria University Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 22 The Professional Project Appendix B DECLARATIONS I declare the following:(1) that the material contained in this Project is the end result of my own work and that due acknowledgement has been given in the bibliography and references to ALL sources be they printed, electronic or personal. (2) the Word Count of this Project is: Section A: .......

Section B: …..... Reflective Statement: ……. Total Word Count: …….. (3) that unless this Project has been confirmed as confidential, I agree to an entire electronic copy or sections of the Project to being placed on Blackboard, if deemed appropriate, to allow future students the opportunity to see examples of past Projects. I understand that if displayed on Blackboard it would be made available for no longer than five years and that students would be able to print off copies or download. The authorship would remain anonymous. 4) I agree to my Project being submitted to a plagiarism detection service, where it will be stored in a database and compared against work submitted from this or any other School or from other institutions using the service. In the event of the service detecting a high degree of similarity between content within the service this will be reported back to my supervisor and second marker, who may decide to undertake further investigation which may ultimately lead to disciplinary actions, should instances of plagiarism be detected. 5) I have read the University Policy Statement on Ethics in Research and Consultancy and the Policy for Informed Consent in Research and Consultancy and I declare that ethical issues have been considered and taken into account in this research. SIGNED: 1 .......................................................... DATE: ................................................................ 1 Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Please remember to sign the declaration before submitting your Project. Page 23 The Professional Project

Appendix C TABLE OF CONTENTS Title page Declaration and Word Count Abstract (to cover both sections) Acknowledgements Contents Page List of figures Glossary (if appropriate) Section A Part 1: Who I am as a learner? Implications for your learning Family & friends to comment Part 2: Implications for career choice Lifelong learning Transferable skills Justify chosen career choice Appendix A – VARK, Myers Briggs, Belbin Inventory Appendix B – Curriculum vitae, two job adverts, a standard application form Appendix C – PowerPoint Presentation Section B Part 1 Introduction

Reason for choice of topic Academic objectives of the Project Outline of each part Part 2 Part 3 Setting the Scene - if required Literature Review Rationale for literature reviewed Critical review of literature relating to academic objectives Part 4 References Bibliography Appendices: Reflective statement Last Page o o It is useful to specify the last page so that the reader may ensure that no pages have been omitted in error. Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 Page 24 Summary and Conclusions The Professional Project

Appendix D Ethics in Research The Northumbria University policy for ethics in research is to be found on the NBS Research Group Blackboard site. Checklist for NBS Students designing and conducting primary research Completely based on secondary data which has previously been published, is desk based and does not involve people in data collection? NO Does your research involve engagement with people in primary data collection? e. g. interview, focus group, questionnaire etc. YES YES There are not normally ethical issues to address.

However you should remain ethically aware. Please ensure that you have not breached plagiarism or copyright regulations and have adequately referenced your material Handbook and Guidance Booklet - 2011/12 You should not involve children or vulnerable adults in your research (other than authorised exceptions with CRB checks) If researching in an NHS context, please discuss ethical approval with a representative from your workplace and gain advice from your supervisor/School Ethics Sub Committee before proceeding Read the policy on informed consent: http://northumbria. c. uk/static/worddocuments/informe dconsent and gain consent from the organisation and people involved. Use implied, verbal or written consent and complete, where appropriate, an informed consent form (available on Blackboard) Read guidelines and address anonymity/confidentiality in research design and writing up: http://northumbria. ac. uk/static/worddocuments/ethicsp olicy. doc Read guidelines on data protection: http://northumbria. ac. uk/sd/central/uso/ndp/nudpp Ensure that you have NOT used inducements to obtain participants Page 25

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