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Pedestrian Counts

1. Pedestrian Counts

My Isoline Map of Cambridge shows that, as I predicted, the overall trend of my data is that the further you move away from the city, the fewer the number of pedestrians. This theory is backed up by my scatter graph, which shows a negative correlation meaning that the pedestrian counts and the distance away from the city centre are inversely proportional, with lower counts the further you move away.

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The two innermost, red coloured zones of the map have pedestrian counts in the mid four hundreds. These counts are this high for a number of reasons. They are in the centre of Cambridge’s CBD, and as a result are filled with high demand shops and services, and a large number of densely populated office blocks.

For instance the reading recorded on Market road, showing 419 people passing that point in ten minutes was most probably due to the famous ‘Cambridge Market’ which lies there. The highest reading of 465 on the corner of St Andrews street was again due to the presence of a great many shops and services. I also note that the time when these readings were taken is also important. The fact that they were taken at 11:30am on a Wednesday morning is crucial as this would be one of the times where the highest density of people would be shopping and working in offices. If these readings had been taken at 11:30am on a Sunday then I believe that the results would have been very different.

At point number 27 I would say that there is an anomalous result. A pedestrian count of only 90 here does not keep in with the 400+ trend, and though there are a few similar results around it, such as the 107 at point 28, I feel that this result is an anomaly. A possible explanation for this is that there are very few shops in that area, but I think that a more likely one is that the boys took the reading at a point which was not actually on the main road, but down a tiny side street. Of course the boy may simply have got it wrong.

The next zone on the Isoline map is coloured orange and deals with pedestrian counts from 300 down to 200. These points are situated mainly near the larger collages meaning I would estimate that the majority of the pedestrians would be tourists. This theory is corroborated by the fact that the highest reading of 270 was recorded at the corner of the St John’s Collage, a place of great tourist interest.

The final yellow zone is for counts of 200 to 100. They seem to be mainly clustered around the western side of the shopping district, with four out of the seven reading found here. The other three readings are on main roads, with the highest of 178 being found at a junction of two main roads.

This Isoline map is similar to the Burgess Urban model, in the highest density of people are in the centre of the town. However, it also differs from it as the zones are clearly not circular, with no people being found on the river.

2. Tax Discs

As you can see from my tax discs map, most (12 out of 20) of the cars I surveyed were registered in Cambridge. This fits my prediction, and the is obviously because the survey was carried out IN Cambridge, and therefore any residents surveyed were very likely to have their car registered at the placed they lived. In regard to the other 8 cars not registered in Cambridge, the ones registered in relatively far off places such as Kent and London and were most probably belonging to tourists who had come up to see Cambridge.