The impasse situation

People want these concerns met (neither excessively nor minimally) but to the appropriate extent. Three standards can be used in measuring the extent to which others are treating these concerns. They are to determine whether the approach to these concerns is fair, is honest and is consistent with current circumstances. According to Webster’s dictionary, an impasse is a point in especially labor negotiations at which reaching an agreement is impossible because neither party is willing to compromise or change position.

The impasse situation I would like to analyze is one where the technical and business teams are working on an initiative. The technical team is taking the lead role. The business team is not cooperative because they believe that the technical team always takes the glory on these types of projects. This conflict has now become an impasse because the business team is not forthcoming with the information that is needed to move the project forward. The concern I would address at such an impasse is that of Status.

It appears that the business team believes that their relative standing is being treated as inferior to others. To meet this concern, as leader of the technical team, I would give full recognition to the business team. This recognition is well deserved because the business team is close to the operations and has a full understanding of the business requirements. I would introduce the business partners by status and designation and recognize their previous contributions at projects of this nature. I would even go as far as saying that these initiatives could not get done without the business partners.

All memos and status reports would be co-signed by the technical and the technical team leaders to show contribution from both teams. By doing this I would be able to overcome any adversarial behavior due to this misconception. Instead, this would encourage co-operative behavior and creative solutions to the problem as well as trust between both teams. References Fisher R. , Shapiro D. , 2005. Beyond reason: using emotions as you negotiate. New York: Viking. pp. 15-21. impasse. (n. d. ). Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Retrieved August 07, 2007, from Dictionary. com website: http://dictionary. reference. com/browse/impasse