A Jack of All Trades

They say that Asian countries, especially those belonging to the third world, have low education standards and don’t speak English at all.  I’d like to take this opportunity to disprove that myth.

I’m a full-blood middle class Indian, born in New Delhi, India, to an army officer and a nurse.  I’d say that I’m very fortunate because my parents were able to put me in a good school and was able to study until the 8th grade.  It is true that India belongs to the third world country due to poverty; so a lot of families can’t afford to put their children into nice schools.  There are a number of good schools in India and I was fortunate enough to have studied in one.  The intensive curriculum in my school developed my IQ especially in the field of science and mathematics.

When my family and I moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 2004, my schoolmates found it truly astounding that Indians could speak and write well in English too.  This is for the fact that English is India’s second language.  There are a lot of dialects in India alone, but that doesn’t mean English is not a language spoken there.

They found how studious and passionate I am with my studies and how I passed with flying colors too.  On top of that, they were pretty amazed that a poindexter like me is actually a sports fanatic too.  I was able to combine studies and sports, doing well in both at the same time.  In fact, I joined the soccer and tennis teams and was able to significantly contribute to the success of both teams. I even lost 30 lbs. out of it.

 I remember how I used to doubt I’d be qualified to join the teams, but I got in after the tryouts.  It is, indeed, very hard for students to combine school and sports at the same time.  I’d say I was very proud to show my schoolmates that an Indian like me can excel in a lot of fields, thus showing that the education standard in India shouldn’t be underestimated.  The more I join teams and mingle with schoolmates, the more I learn about American culture.

Eventually, my dad found a new job in Austin, Texas, so my family and I had to relocate.  I went to Westwood high school, which is one of the best schools in the US, and I found out that the curriculum there challenged me intellectually and physically.

I decided to quit sports when I went to junior high because I took up 5 AP classes.  I took up AP Chemistry, AP English, AP Physics, AP Statistics and AP Computer Science classes.  The standard of the school is very high, so is the level of difficulty.  At first, I found the curriculum too challenging, but I came to realize the advantages of finishing at Westwood high school.

I realized that the intensive curriculum could work to my advantage in the future, so I pursued studying well.  I even compared Westwood high school to my previous school in Massachusetts.  Thus, I am very proud to have finished with flying colors in Westwood high school.

All the experiences I’ve gone through had made me a jack of all trades.  I was able to prove I can excel in all fields I wish to pursue.  The culture I grew up with in India had given me special traits that made me go through the hardest challenges in life with ease and gratitude.

My parents were always there to help me, and because of this, I’m forever indebted.  I want to make them prouder, so I am taking this opportunity to explore greater chances of earning a degree that could help me in my desired profession one day.

I am also very grateful that America has given opportunities to Asians like me for better education, and pursuing excellence in my studies will not only make America proud they have produced graduates like me, but will also make my motherland, India, proudest.