Last Updated 08 May 2020

Trans formistic organisations

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Essay type Research
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This assignment is talking about The Influence of burns on trans formistic organisations. As an organisation the author has chosen Bader Alhasse & Co. ( Charted Accounting and auditors). Libya as an example for the research. Introduction Organisations may be in the most advantageous position to facilitate unprecedented advances for society and resolve highly complex problems based on their capacity to mobilize resources and frequently transcend political boundaries.

With this capability, twenty-first century organizations can be conceived as integrating mechanisms where public and private organizations form the capacity that the community will need to determine how to balance two apparently contradictory requirements - the functions for which they exist and the social responsibility to work on the problems and challenges of the society (Drucker, 1994). An organizational transformation effort is analysed and serves to illustrate concepts used in the framework.

The concept of transformistic organizations describes the capacity of an existing or new organization to facilitate multiple levels of transformation (individual, organizational and societal) by partially or completely changing its human capabilities, structure, and/or functions in alignment with its core values and unifying purpose to respond to or directly impact needs that arise from the dynamic field of the environment.

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Such organisations have the ability to act responsively and creatively to emerging factors in the environment due to their continuous development of human capabilities and clear identification of core values and unifying purposes (Argyris, 1965; Emery & Trist, 1973; Senge, 1990). They may act in alliance with other organizations or independently based on the nature and magnitude of the issue or need. Burns (1978) developed the initial ideas on transformational and transactional leadership and Bass (1985) further refined them and introduced them into an organisational context.

Transactional leadership is known to be best suited under stable conditions. In general a transactional leader identifies the needs, wants and expectations of his or her subordinates then due to the stability of the situation these preferences can be met. As a result of the satisfaction, the subordinates will enter into a transaction with the leader in which they increase productivity and effort to reach the aims and objectives of the leader.

The new era in which organisations must function is characterised by factors such as intense global concern and competition; intraorganistional relationships and competition; a focus on democracy, substantive justice, civic virtues, and the common good; values orientation; empowerment and trust; consensus-oriented policy-making processes diversity and pluralism in structure and participation; critical dialogue, qualitative language, and methodologies; collectivised rewards; and market alignment (Bennis & Slater, 1968; Emery & Trist, 1973; Toffler,1980; Clegg,1990; Rost,1991; Kuhnert1993;).

Interdependencies are fostered as a way of life in environments which dynamic properties such as these. The social imperative for organisations is to understand the interdependent nature of this new environment and purposely link their survival efforts to the survival and well-being of society.

The concept of "transformistic organisations" descries the capacity of the existing or new organisation to facilitate multiple levels of transformation (individual, organisational, or societal) by partially or completely changing its human capabilities, structure, and/or functions in alignment with its core values and unifying purpose to respond to or directly impact needs that arise from the environment. Several organisational initiatives illustrate this strong commitment to both organisational purpose and social change.

Organisations with a social imperative that links their survival to the well-being of society may be better posited in the long run to maintain their human and economic viability. The Influence of burns on trans formistic organisations: Organisation may be in the mossy advantages position to facilitate unprecedented advances for society and resolve highly complex problems based on their capacity to mobilise resources and often transcend political entitles. The essential element is leadership, the kind of leadership that assumes elevated sights and dimensions beyond those set in previous eras.

Transforming leadership within transformistic organisations provides the potential to bring about unprecedented change. Transformistic organisations necessitate leadership by activists who work internally and externally to bring about human and economic metamorphosis. Inside the organisation they generate vision, mission, goals and structure that contribute to the capacity of individuals, groups, and the organisation to practice its values, serve its purpose, maintain strong economic viability, and serve societal needs.

Organisations will need to develop the ability to generate and expand human capacity at multiple levels (individual, group, organisational, societal) and forge the interconnectedness among these levels. The transformistic organisation presents elements in their emergent and idealised form. However, it is intended to help us move systematically toward a more comprehensive view of the purposes, structure, functioning, and roles of organisations in anew era and to specifically examine the role of transforming leadership in capacity building within this context Transformational leadership

Bass (1985), and others, has proven to be one of the more important macro perspectives of leadership to emerge out of the post-modern critique of earlier, more deterministic perspectives the transformational leader "looks for potential motives in followers, seeks to satisfy higher needs, and engages the full person of the follower" (Burns, 1978, p. 4) in an effort to transform followers into self- motivated "leaders" and to create a culture of organisational effectiveness. Bryman (1996) has labelled this, "the new leadership," to recognise its departure from earlier models of leadership.

Critical theorists' central concern with Transformational approaches is that transformational behaviours seek to advance the leader's control and managerial agendas by appearing to "empower" the individual. That is, Transformational leadership is ultimately about accomplishing the vision of the leader. Transformational theory defines leaders as managers of meaning, as Opposed to earlier theories, which saw leaders as "managers of influence" (Bryman, 1996; Smircich & Morgan, 1982). Complexity theory likewise seeks strategies for stimulating effective organisational Behaviour, but it does so from a uniquely different perspective.

Complexity Theory explores the dynamics of social network behaviour, focusing on the products of Interdependent interaction rather than on the products of direct leadership. Leadership Activity is certainly important, but it is couched within the broader context of interactive dynamics. Transformational leadership represents a top-down leadership approach and suggests more direct attempts at leadership influence. It does this through its emphasis on vision and getting people to "buy into" and follow the vision.

An adaptation of Burn's transforming leadership concept has been used in organisations since the 1980s (Bass, 1985; Bennis ; Nanus, 1985; Tichy ; Devanna, 1986; Bass, Avolio ; Goodheim, 1987; Bass, Waldman, Avolio ; Bebb, 1987). Its use has focused primarily on interactions between leaders and followers inside the organization with less emphasis on societal transformation. The new era in which organisations must function challenges and may require organisations to contribute to societal change while strongly sustaining their intended purpose and goals.

This new era is distinguished by factors such as: intense global concern and competition; intra-organisational relationships and collaboration; a focus on democracy, substantive justice, civic virtues, and the common good; values orientation; empowerment and trust; consensus-oriented policy making processes; diversity and pluralism in structure and participation; critical dialogue, qualitative language and methodologies; collectivised rewards; and market alignments (Kuhnert, 1993; Rost, 1991; Clegg, 1990; Toffler, 1980; Emery and Trist, 1973; Bennis and Slater, 1968).

It is these factors that generate the potential for transforming leadership to be employed in organisations for greater purposes. These factors allow organisations acting in alliance with others tremendous new opportunities to move society from "an economic production orientation" to a "total well being" orientation" (Toffler, 1980). The Conceptual Framework:

The transformistic organization framework, presents elements in their emergent and idealised form. However, the framework is intended to help us move systematically toward a more comprehensive view of the purpose, structure, functioning and roles of organizations in a new era, and to specifically examine the role of leadership within this context.

The framework focuses on four interdependent components - a dynamic and turbulent environment; the organization as a context for capacity building; transforming leadership that mobilises, facilitates and elevates human and organisational processes; and outcomes characterised by maximised human and organisational capabilities and contributions for the individual, organisation, and society. The Environment: The environment in which contemporary organizations are functioning can be characterised as dynamic and turbulent.

In the transformistic organization framework, leaders and followers identify and assess changes in the external environment in terms of their opportunities or requirements for capacity building, effect on continued organizational viability, and impact on various sectors of society. The effects of larger societal challenges such as changes or decline in urban environments, changes in family structures, and cultural and ethnic diversity are becoming intermeshed purposefully and often unexpectedly with organisational functioning.

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Trans formistic organisations. (2018, Sep 25). Retrieved from https://phdessay.com/trans-formistic-organisations/

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