A Critical Evaluation of Myself

Life is a continuous succession of events. The happiest incidents always linger in our minds as sweet memories. The most memorable incident in my life is the transition of Hong Kong into an integral part of the great country China. This brought about great changes in the life style and the political affairs of the people.

I am proud to be a Chinese citizen now. Actually, I was born in Shanghai and brought up in Hong Kong. I consider myself to be very lucky to be the part of a very large country with a glorious past and a rich cultural heritage. The ‘great wall of china’ is one of the greatest wonders of the world. This beautiful structure clearly demonstrates the glory and power of ancient China.

Growing up in modern Hong Kong was a great opportunity. Hong Kong has an international culture firmly rooted in age-old Chinese traditions. Life in Hong offers a fine blend of tradition and modernity. My life itself is proof of this wonderful fusion.

Though I come from a traditional family, I was given the freedom to choose my life and pursue my career. I chose to major in art for my graduation. This may appear a bit odd for a person living in a commercial metropolis like Hong Kong. My ambition is to become a great artist. I believe I can achieve my dream because I am a very imaginative person. My specialization is photography and each time before I take a picture, I imagine how it would look like. This critical thinking power has greatly helped me to become an excellent photographer.

All great countries are built upon the solid foundations of their culture. A number of great kings belonging to different dynasties who ruled China built up its great traditions. I love the Tong dynasty very much because they had developed China into a very powerful nation. Today China is a modern nation built upon the foundation of its tradition and culture.

The success of a country is defined by its harmonious blending of the past and the present as in the case of Japan as well. The Japanese are rooted in history and tradition, but they are ready to embrace the new as my Japanese friend Satoko Nishikawa (2009) says: “ In the city, there are tall buildings and old temples next to each other.

Japanese culture is very traditional but at the same time people like to embrace the new. Japanese try to find a guide into tomorrow by taking lessons from the past”. Similarly, my other Japanese friend, Lidia Asato talks about the advantages of the fusion or blending of two diametrically opposed cultures. Born and brought up in Peru, Lidia  Asato (2009) though a full-blooded Japanese, grew up imbibing the Peruvian culture. Unlike the Japanese who are low profile and disciplined, the Peruvians are extroverts with a sense of humor.

Mylinh Phu (2009), my Vietnamese friend also believes in accepting other culture without losing one’s own identity by declaring that “I grew up in America but I am proud to be a Vietnamese.  I still maintain my own culture by teaching my children how to speak Vietnamese”. This attitude is a clear proof of the power of critical thinking in myself as well as in my friends.