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Racial Autobiography Curriculum Unit

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Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice Danae O’Bryan EDU 6051: Race & Ethnicity 21 October 2011 Final Action Plan Assignment Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 1 Contents: Introduction to the Action Plan Project Stage 1 For Project/Unit Unit Outline Sample Lesson 1 & Handout(s) Sample Lesson 2 & Handout(s) Sample Lesson 3 & Handout(s) Sample Lesson 4 & Handout(s) Culminating Performance Task Resources

Page Number 3 4 6 7 9 13 18 23 25 Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 2 Introduction to the Action Plan: Welcome to my action plan! This curricular approach to creating an anti-racist classroom experience was designed for four ninth grade classes at Malden High School in Malden, Massachusetts. The lessons attached to this action plan are anchored in the Massachusetts Common Core Curriculum Frameworks (2010).

Upon first glance at the demographics of Malden High School it is easy to assume that the school has successfully integrated various racial minority and majority groups into its system (African American or Black - 22. 2%, Asian - 22. 7, Hipic or Latino - 17. 6%, Multi-race, Non-Hipic - 2. 7%, Native American - 0. 6%, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander - 0. 1%, White - 34. 2%). However, there is still a lack of knowledge among students regarding their own racial identity and the experiences of others of different race and ethnic groups.

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In Northeastern University’s Race & Ethnicity course the idea of “colorblindness” was discussed at length as being something as powerfully ineffective as racism itself. At Malden High School students of differing racial groups sort of “coexist,” which is something I hope this action plan will begin to change through students’ awareness of racial identity development. Fortunately, the 9th grade curriculum for English Language Arts has placed a heavy emphasis on the overarching theme of identity.

Students read Our America over the summer for their summer reading, and write about their own identity in an essay upon entering school this year. This allowed for a more fluid transition into the introduction of racial identity development. After studying the various racial identity development theories in Northeastern University’s Race & Ethnicity course, it seemed essential to tie the importance of racial identity into a students discovery of his or herself. I have learned that the end goal of our recognition of identity is just as important as the developmental process it took to get there.

If students reflect only on who they are today, without acknowledging the events and experiences that have shaped their racial identity, they are missing the key information needed in order to create change; And that is the motivation behind exploring our past to change our future through this antiracism action plan project. This action plan is centered around the Understanding by Design model, which allows for essential questions and understanding to be thoughtfully explored while working towards an end product.

The end product, or, the culminating performance task, is one that challenges students to think critically about the experiences that shaped their racial identity. In turn, the students are asked to produce a racial identity autobiography. I hope you find this action plan useful and choose to incorporate some of the lessons into your own classrooms. Enjoy! Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 3 Racial Identity Development Autobiography Stage 1

Understandings Students will understand that… Racial identity plays a role in how he/she interacts in society and become involved with his/her community Different factors, including life experiences, shape his/her racial identity Potential Essential Questions Misunderstandings Students may be unable to see how his/her identity contributes to the community at large Student may overlook or be unable to remember particular experiences that contribute to his/her identity Application: How can we use the knowledge and understanding of our racial identities to overcome racism?

Explanation: What are the stages of racial identity development? Interpretation: What do my experiences reveal about my racial identity? Why does knowing my racial identity development process matter? Perspective: How do our racial identities differ from each other? Empathy: How might we reach and understanding of others' racial identities? Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicities shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? What are my “blind-spots” and limitations of understanding the racial experiences of others?

There are various consequences for racial stereotypes, which affect the society we live in No person fits neatly into a clear racial group, people are individuals, not just members of a racial group Students may have a hard time letting go of stereotypes and bias he/she has seen as “normal” for so long Students may feel Racial identities are that his/her racial always flux and complex, identity autobiography now never fixed or simple, and should be discussed defines them instead that way in the classroom of realizing that it is a work in progress, and outside of school something that can change

Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 4 Knowledge Students will know... ? Skills Students will be able to... Core vocabulary: Race, ethnicity, (Including MCCR frameworks) stereotype, bias, -ism, ? Discuss what shapes their racial identity with definitive language nationality, prejudice, appropriate to the dialogue (MCF autobiography (MCF L 4). SL 1). ? The following terms: ?

Evaluate identity narratives from Socioeconomic status; various authors whole focusing institutional racism and on “craft and structure” as well discrimination; discrimination as “key ideas and details” (MCF RL 1-6). through economic, cultural, and ? Create and revise a racial identity political means; scapegoating; autobiography (MCF W 3, 5, 6). dehumanization; segregation; ? Recognize and identify various oppression; civil rights (MCF L 4). stereotypes as portrayed in ?

The language involved in anti popular television and other racist activism. media. ? The stages of racial identity development. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 5 Unit Outline: Since this project is being implemented after the To Kill a Mockingbird unit has already begun, the students have already read chapters 1-11 of the novel. In addition, they have watched a documentary on the Scottsboro trials titled “Scottsboro: An American Tragedy. Thus, the lessons that follow are not at the start of the To Kill a Mockingbird unit, but they do start at the implementation of the Action Plan project (which is being incorporated into the To Kill a Mockingbird unit). This is only a suggested timeline. You may wish to include additional lessons. In addition, you may replace or adjust some of these lessons provided. ¦ Sample Lesson 1: (Included) ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Sample Lesson 2: (Included) ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Sample Lesson 3: (Included) ¦ ¦ ¦ “A Product of this Town” by J.

Malcom Garcia Rules to follow in class discussion Mark up the Text / In-class discussion Racial Identity Anticipation Guide Discussion (On Racial Identity Anticipation guide) Introduction to the Project - GRASPS Breaking down stereotypes Analyzing media in search for stereotypes PowerPoint slides (uploaded as separate document) - Introduction to theories Teacher shares personal Racial Identity Autobiography Work as class to develop mini-RIA for Jem (character in TKAM) Using self-interview answers and knowledge of theory stages, plan autobiography Photo definition of self - free write/reflection Computer lab- work on typing RIA Sharing RIA’s - possible “silent” discussion Revisit Anticipation guides ¦ Sample Lesson 4: (Included) ¦ ¦ Sample Lesson 5: (Not Included) ¦ ¦ ¦ Sample Lesson 6: (Not Included) ¦ ¦ ¦ Sample Lesson 7: (Not Included) ¦ ¦ Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 6 Sample Lesson1 : “A Product of This Town” - Mark Up Text and In-Class Discussion I.

Learning Objectives for Today & Evidence/Assessment of Learning Learning objectives: (SWBAT) Students will be able to... Explain the parallels between the “old” South and the “new” South with regards to racism, segregation, and injustice (Scottsboro/Jena) Discuss how Garcia’s experiences in Jena influenced his racial identity Produce a short reflection that sums up the discussion on Scottsboro and P. O. T. T Evidence/Assessment of Work Collection of “Do Now” notebooks at the end of quarter Informal checks for understanding through participation in the class discussion Collection of reflection for participation credit Standards: MCF (Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks) RI 9, SL 1 & 4 II. Essential Question[s] for Today: ? ? ?

Interpretation: What do my experiences reveal about my racial identity? Why does knowing my racial identity development process matter? Perspective: How do our racial identities differ from each other? Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicities shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? III. Why Learning this Matters: Up until this point in the unit, students have been reading To Kill a Mockingbird and discussing Jim Crow, the Scottsboro Trials, and segregation as well as racism in the south. Today they are reading and marking up the article by J. Malcom Garcia titled “A Product of this Town. ” This article deals with the “Jena 6” event that happened down in Louisiana in 2006.

I wanted to give students a modern day perspective on the existence of extreme racism and segregation to get them talking about these issues in a modern day context. It’s also important that students start learning how to “talk” about these issues of racism and segregation out loud in a class discussion. IV. Learning Experiences: ? Optional: For this class, the students watched the following video yesterday, but for future classes, it might work to show the video before the discussion (http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=3SrIEM8X0qA). The students also came to class having marked up the article for homework. This could be done as an in-class assignment as well. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 7 ?

Do now (10 minutes): Respond the the following questions: (1) What are some of the experiences/interactions/conversations Garcia had with Jenains (people of Jena) that influenced the way he saw the town? (2) Why do you think he included some of the perspectives he included? Which did you think were the most powerful, meaningful, and interesting? (3) What parallels can you draw between “A Product of this Town” and the Scottsboro: An American Tragedy documentary? Lesson (30 minutes): Desks go into circle. Students create “ground rules” for discussion (no trash-talking or put-downs, everyone must contribute at least once, the person speaking calls on the next person, no interrupting, respectfully disagree, etc).

The “Do Now” questions kickstart our conversation followed by the preceding few questions: 0 Why did Garcia title his work “A Product of this Town? ” What do you think “product” refers to? 0 What did you think of Cleveland Riser? Why are words so important to him, what does he say they give us the ability to do? 0 What do you notice about the difference in ages/generations that Garcia interacts with? 0 What role does religion play in Jena? What to the the two pastors (Rev. Thompson and Rev. Moran) say about the event?

Independent work/Closing (15 minutes): Students will spend the last ten minutes of class writing a reflection on some of the issues and conversation that came up in class today including (1) One thing they agreed with. 2) One thing they disagreed with, (3) Something that was talked about that you would like to explore more, (4) one thing you did not get to address that you would like to point out at a later date, and (5) how you think the discussion went overall and what should have changed and why. ? ? Materials ? Student notebooks ? “A Product of this Town” article (J. Malcom Garcia) Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 8 Sample Lesson 2: Anticipation guide, Discussion, GRASPS I. Learning Objectives for Today & Evidence/Assessment of Learning Learning objectives: (SWBAT) Students will be able to...

Explore a range of questions pertaining to the topic of racial identity to activate background knowledge and personal experiences regarding race Engage in a whole-class discussion on race Demonstrate an understanding of the culminating performance task for the racial autobiography assignment Evidence/Assessment of Work Collection of anticipation guides Participation in discussion Exit slip: Describe briefly (two or three sentences) your racial autobiography assignment. Standards: MCF SL 1 & 4 II. Essential Question[s] for Today: ? ? ? Application: How can we use the knowledge and understanding of our racial identities to overcome racism? Interpretation: What do my experiences reveal about my racial identity? Why does knowing my racial identity development process matter? Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicities shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? III.

Why Learning this Matters: It is really important that students are given the opportunity to talk about the issues surrounding race and racism. By starting with an anticipation guide and giving students a tangible concrete list of vocabulary definitions for terms that will be coming up over the next few days, students are provided some of the foundational terms in which to begin talking about race and racism. In addition, it is important that students learn the acceptable way to have these conversations with peers outside his/her race and ethnicity. IV. Learning Experiences: Do now (5-10 minutes): What words or phrases come to mind when you think of race? (List all that apply) Lesson (10 minutes): Distribute anticipation guide.

Today we will be working on kick-starting our racial identity autobiography end-of-the-unit assignment. Before I introduce the project to you, I want to get a feel for what you know, or think you know, about race. So, take 10 minutes and complete this anticipation guide. (Go through directions) Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 9 Independent (individual, pair, group, whole-class) work (20 minutes): Okay, let’s talk about some of your reactions to the questions in this guide. In your group, share your answers and reactions to the questions. Take ten minutes. Choose one person to jot down some notes about what you are discussing in your group.

After ten minutes come back together as a class. Pull the class into a discussion by having one group share some of their reactions and allow those group members to call on other class members to contribute. Closing (10 minutes): I hope today’s lesson got you interested in learning a bit more about race. At the end of our To Kill a Mockingbird unit, you are going to hand in a project which I will explain to you now. Distribute GRASPS handout. Go over with students. In the last two minutes have students, as their “ticket out the door” complete the following exit slip: Describe briefly (two or three sentences) your racial autobiography assignment.

And write one sentence about something they are looking forward to talking about or learning about while we work on these autobiographies. Materials ? ? ? Student notebooks Handouts (Anticipation guide, terms sheet, and GRASPS) Index cards for exit slips Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 10 Name: ______________________ Period: _______ Date: _________ Ms. Nims, Ms. O’Bryan To Kill a Mockingbird/Racial Identity Autobiography Project Racial Identity Anticipation Guide Directions: In the space provided in the right column, write a “D” if you disagree with the statement, or an “A” if you agree with the statement.

Then explain your reasoning for why you agreed or disagreed. # 1 Statement Racism is mostly a dead issue today. Agree/ Disagree Explanation/Reasoning Why did you agree/disagree? 2 I feel comfortable talking about race and racism with those of the same race as me. I feel comfortable talking about race and racism with those of a different race as me. There is a difference between race and ethnicity. 3 4 5 Stereotypes and prejudices about a person’s race can have a negative effect on their life. I have seen or experienced some form of racism at school or in a non-school setting. Certain races benefit from racism. 6 7 8 There isn’t anything I can do to change the way racism exists today.

Discrimination: Denying access of goods, resources, and services to members of a particular social group. Discrimination is an action that typically results from prejudice. Discrimination can occur at the individual, organizational, or societal level. Ethnicity: Refers to membership of in a culturally- and geographically defined group that may share language, cultural practices, religion, or other aspects. Examples include Italian, Kurdish, and Bantu. People of the same race can be of different ethnicities.

For example, Asians can be Japanese, Korean, Thai, or many other ethnicities. Institutional discrimination: Discrimination that occurs through educational systems, legal systems, or other public systems or services. Denying people the right to vote is a form of institutional discrimination. See also "ism. " -ism (racism, sexism, etc. ): The use of social power to systematically deny people access to resources, rights, respect, and representation on the basis of gender, race, age, income, or membership in any other group. Isms are based on the false belief that one group is superior to another group. Nationality: Refers to country of citizenship.

However, nationality is sometimes used to mean ethnicity, even though the two are technically different. People of one ethnic group do not necessarily live in one geographic location (such as an Italian living in Italy and an Italian-American living in the US). Because of this, ethnicity and nationality are not always the same. Prejudice: A negative attitude toward a socially defined group and toward any person perceived to be a member of the group. Like biases, prejudice is a belief. Race: Refers to physical differences of skin tone, hair texture, and facial features. Because people can be grouped by any number of physical differences (height, foot size, resistance to certain diseases), race is an artificial way to categorize people.

Nonetheless, race remains an important concept because of the social and political issues that arise from it. Socioeconomic status: Refers to differences in wealth, income, other economic resources, and social ranking. Stereotype: an exaggerated belief, image or distorted truth about a person or group - a generalization that allows for little or no individual differences or social variation. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 12 Same Lesson 3: Decoding Discrimination and Breaking Down Stereotypes I. Learning Objectives for Today & Evidence/Assessment of Learning Learning objectives: (SWBAT) Students will be able to...

Reflect on their experience with prejudices and stereotypes and how they result in discrimination and illustrate a stereotype and identify stereotypes illustrated by other students Understand that discrimination is not just the result of individual actions, but rather a system of exclusion that affects economic, social, political, and cultural institutions. Analyze stereotypes in the media Evidence/Assessment of Work In-class discussion and “Do Now” prompt Mini lesson and evaluation of video clip Homework (suggested two nights or a weekend to complete) II. Essential Question[s] for Today:  Perspective: How do our racial identities differ from each other? Empathy: How might we reach and understanding of others' racial identities?

Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicity's shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? What are my “blind-spots” and limitations of understanding the racial experiences of others? III. Why Learning this Matters: The conversation will inevitably grow uncomfortable today. And that’s good! It’s important for students to take at least this away from today’s lesson: As long as you are talking about race and racial discrimination in a constructive way (or a way that at least exposes the issue), it is okay for things to get uncomfortable. Without today’s lesson on exposing stereotypes and prejudices, students will not be able to effectively move forward in the process of uncovering their racial identity development.

Students will also learn how to analyze stereotypes that they find in their everyday lives, whether it’s the music they listen to, the Internet sites they visit, or the television shows they watch. IV. Learning Experiences: Do now (5-10 minutes): What is a stereotype? What do you think it is? Have you seen or experienced stereotyping? What is an example of one? Can you list some “groups” or “categories” of people? (i. e. , “jocks,” “hippies,” etc. ) Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 13 Lesson (10 minutes): So where do racial stereotypes come into play? How are racial stereotypes formed? (Display the following on the board:) Race refers to a group of people who share the same physical characteristics such as skin tone, hair texture, and facial features.

The transmission of traits from one generation to another is a complex process that is examined in a field of study called genetics. Race is a significant social issue because people use racial differences as the basis for discrimination. Much of today's racism can be traced to the era of colonialism that began in the 1400s. When Europeans began colonizing Africa and the Americas, the white settlers adopted the idea that they were superior to the other races they encountered. The false notion that Africans and Native Americans were inferior (along with the desire for economic power) justified the Europeans' taking land and enslaving people. In this way, naturally-occurring racial differences became the basis for systems of exploitation and discrimination.

Racism is the systematic practice of denying people access to rights, representation, or resources based on racial differences. As you will learn in this lesson, racism involves more than personal actions of individuals. It is a thorough system of discrimination that involves social institutions and affects virtually every aspect of society. It's important to remember that racism is neither natural nor inevitable. Through history, people of different racial groups have interacted and co-existed peacefully. During the Middle Ages, for example, Europeans looked up to the people of Africa and China, whose civilization and culture were considered to be more advanced. As noted, however, these ideas changed significantly during the colonial area.

As you learn more about race in this lesson, remember that racism is a system people created -- and one that people can dismantle. Independent (individual, pair, group, whole-class) work (20 minutes): Okay, let’s explore some of our experiences with stereotypes. As a class make two lists: (1) Race (2) Ethnicity. (1) Begin with a discussion on the concepts of race and ethnicity. Write each word on the board or on a flip chart and ask students to list the attributes that define the terms "race" and "ethnicity. " Record their ideas. Next, ask students for the names of five different racial or ethnic groups. (2) Prepare five large sheets of paper (flip chart paper). At the top of each sheet, write the name of one of the groups that the students named. 3) Give each group one of the five sheets of paper. Ask them to list as many stereotypes that are commonly used to describe the category of people written at the top of paper.

Give students three minutes to complete the exercise. Emphasize that students should list stereotypes that they have heard, not ones that they necessarily believe to be true. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 14 (4) When they are finished, rotate the sheets of paper between groups so that each group works on a new sheet. Have them add any unlisted stereotype adjectives. Rotate every three minutes until every group has worked on every sheet. 5) Post the sheets in class where everyone can see them and give students five minutes to read the sheets. (6)

Conclude the lesson with a discussion on the exercise, asking students the following: ? How do the stereotypes recorded by the class make you feel? ? What do you notice about the stereotypes listed? Be aware that the students may have listed good and bad adjectives, many stereotypes for different groups, or the same stereotypes for different groups. ? Where have you seen these stereotypes portrayed? television programs, movies, magazines, books? ? How do you think a stereotype might cause someone to act unfairly toward another person?

Now, let’s look at some stereotypes (more specifically some racial stereotypes) we can see in the media. If there’s time play the following clip: This is a clip comprised of many moments from the show “Modern Family” where Gloria, the only racial minority in the show, is highlighted for all of her mispronunciations: http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=bKwOoRd5tHk This clip is meant to be humorous but what is the stereotype it is casting forth about Columbians? Closing (10 minutes): In our Racial Identity Autobiographies (RIAs) we will be exploring our own racial identities and how racial stereotypes (good or bad) have shaped some of our experiences. Over the weekend, I want you to fill out this handout.

It asks you to evaluate some of the modern “pop culture” stereotypes you encounter daily. Record the shows you watch, songs you listen to, radio stations you tune into, and Internet sites you visit. Prepare to discuss these on Monday. Materials ? ? Student notebooks Handouts (Stereotypes in the media) Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice

Keep a log over the weekend in which you will record your observations about racial stereotyping in the media (including news stories, advertisements, television programs, music, music videos, billboards and movies). Continue on back or attach extra paper if needed. Type of Media (movie, TV, billboard, song, etc) What racial stereotypes are being shown? What action is taking place? What role does the ethnic character have? Is this person part of the majority or minority? How are the other characters treating this person? In your opinion, was this person being negatively or positively stereotyped? What was your personal reaction to this example of stereotyping (angry, funny, no reaction really, etc)? (1) (2)

Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 16 (3) (4) (5) Guidelines for discussion on this assignment: · Use "I" statements only. Speak only of your own experiences, thoughts, and beliefs. · Speak honestly, but also consider the impact of your words. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 17 Sample Lesson 4: Introduction to Racial Identity Development Theories and Ms. O’Bryan’s RIA I. Learning Objectives for Today & Evidence/Assessment of Learning Learning objectives: (SWBAT) Students will be able to... Explain the various stages of Black, White, biracial, and minority racial development.

Conduct a “self-interview” where they explore questions about his or her experience regarding race Evidence/Assessment of Work Informal checks for understanding and checks to see that students are “marking up” their lecture notes Homework - collected on later date (suggested two days to complete) II. Essential Question[s] for Today: ? ? ? Empathy: How might we reach and understanding of others' racial identities? Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicity's shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? Self-Knowledge: What are my “blind-spots” and limitations of understanding the racial experiences of others? III.

Why Learning this Matters: Today will inevitably be a challenging lesson for students. Since most of them have not been exposed to any type of “theories,” they might have a hard time grasping a theory that pertains to development. However, for students to truly work towards the understanding of their own racial identity, it is important that they are exposed to some research on the subject that can help them make sense of their experiences. Not only will they have a chance to see what the “normal” stages are for racial identity development, but they will also get a chance to see what an RIA will look like. IV. Learning Experiences: Do now (5-10 minutes): Do you think that stereotyping shapes a person’s racial identity?

What other experiences do you think shape a person’s racial identity? Lesson (10 minutes): (If this lesson follows the stereotype lesson, use this time to discuss some of the examples the students brought to class). In addition: Today you are going to see an example of a Racial Identity Autobiography - mine! This will help you get a better understanding of what yours will look like, since you will begin working on it tonight. Before I show you mine though, it’s important that you learn about the “theories” of how racial identity is formed. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 18

Independent (individual, pair, group, whole-class) work (20 minutes): PowerPoint : Provide students with copies of the slides (3 per page that have a section for taking notes). Encourage (or assign) students to mark up the text as we go through these slides. (See PowerPoint document) Closing (15 minutes): Homework: For tonight, use the handout provided to start exploring some of your own experiences that may have shaped your racial identity development. Materials ? Student notebooks ? Self-interview questions Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 19 Name: _______________________ Date: ______________ Period: ___ Ms. Nims, Ms.

O’Bryan Racial Identity Autobiography/TKAM Self-Interview Questions This assignment will help you start brainstorming some experiences you wish to discuss in your racial identity autobiography. Pretend as though you are “interviewing” yourself to get at the importance of each of these experiences. Jot down notes to answer these questions. Let them guide but not limit your thinking. Jot down any other memories or ideas that seem relevant to you. (You won't hand in these notes, but they'll help you participate in the discussion. ) 1. Family: Are your parents the same race? same ethnic group? Are your brothers and sisters? What about your extended family -- uncles, aunts, etc.? Where did your parents grow up?

What exposure did they have to racial groups other than their own? (Have you ever talked with them about this? ) What ideas did they grow up with, regarding race relations? (Again, do you know? Have you ever talked with them about this? Why or why not? ) Do you think of yourself as white? (If you're not white, do you think of yourself as black, or AsianAmerican, etc.? ) or just as "human"? Do you think of yourself as a member of an ethnic group? What is its importance to you? Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 20

2. Neighborhood: What is the racial makeup of the neighborhood you grew up in? What was your first awareness of race? - that there are different "races" and that you are one. What was your first encounter with another race? Describe the situation. Is there anyone here who hasn't heard the word "nigger"? [usually no one] Where did you first hear it? What messages do you recall getting from your parents about race? from others when you were little? 3. Elementary and Middle School: What was the racial makeup of your elementary school? Of its teachers? Think about the curriculum: what black Americans did you hear about? How did you celebrate Martin Luther King Day? Cultural influences: TV, advertising,novels, music, movies, etc. What color God was presented to you? angels? S. Claus? the tooth fairy! Dolls?

What was the racial makeup of organizations you were in? Girl Scouts, soccer team, church, etc.? 4. High School and community: Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 21 What is the racial makeup of your high school? Of its teachers? Is there interracial dating? Any racial slurs? Any conflict with members of another race? Have you ever felt or been stigmatized because of your race, gender, or ethnic group membership? Because of your sexual orientation? social class? What is the racial makeup of your home town? of your metropolitan area? What of your experiences there, in summer camp, summer jobs, etc.? 5.

Future: Realistically, think about where you envision living as you start a family. What is its racial makeup? social class makeup? What occupation do you foresee, 10 years hence? What is its racial makeup? social class makeup? 6. General: What's the most important image, encounter, whatever, you've had regarding race? Have you felt threatened? In the minority? Have you felt privileged? What do you want to tell us that we didn't ask about? About handicap, sexual orientation, social class, whatever? Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 22 Name: _________________________ Period: _________ Date: __________

Ms. Nims, Ms. O’Bryan To Kill a Mockingbird- RIA Assignment Culminating Performing Task for To Kill a Mockingbird: Racial Identity Autobiography Description of project: Alright, ninth graders, for your end-of-the-unit assignment you will be working to create a racial identity autobiography. Most of you completed an identity (who am I? ) paper at the beginning of the school year, but this time you will be doing something much different. I will explain the project to you in the terms of an acronym, because I know how much we all love acronyms! GRASPS Goal: ¦ The goal of this project is for you to get a better understanding of your racial identity.

Throughout the rest of our work this quarter, we will be exploring some of the following questions that you should be able to answer by the time you get to your autobiography: Application: How can we use the knowledge and understanding of our racial identities to overcome racism? Explanation: What is a racial identity and what are the stages of racial identity development? Interpretation: What do my experiences reveal about my racial identity? Why does knowing my racial identity development process matter? Perspective: How do our racial identities differ from each other? Empathy: How might we reach and understanding of others' racial identities?

Self-Knowledge: How are my opinions about other races and ethnicities shaped by stereotypes, assumptions, and prejudices? What are my “blind-spots” and limitations of understanding the racial experiences of others? Role: ¦ You are writing this autobiography as yourself. The experiences you share in this racial identity development are of you past, but they will be helpful in shaping who you are in the future. Audience: ¦ Just as you are writing this autobiography as yourself, you are also writing it for yourself. I think that it would be great if you would be willing to share it at some point, but that is up to you. Write your autobiography as if no one else will read it.

Who knows, maybe towards the end of the unit you will be willing and comfortable enough to share yourself with the class. Situation: ¦ The situation is as follows: We could talk day in, and day out, about what racism looks like in our society. We could learn every stereotype and become comfortable discussing all of this in class. However, one of the more important parts of overcoming racism is coming to terms with Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 23 our own racial identity. So think of it this way: In order for Malden High School (and potentially the Malden community) to become leaders in an anti-racist movement, each individual has to reflect on his or her racial identity.

In order to understand others and appreciate a truly diverse society, we must learn how experiences shape who we are and how we interact with each other. Product, Performance, Perspective: This is what I like to call the “nitty-gritty” section. It's what you will turning in and I will be grading. Racial Identity Autobiography (Total: 4 points) 1. 2 Pages typed, double-spaced, 12 font 1. Must include examples from at least two stages of racial identity development (see PowerPoint slides) 2. Must show thoughtful analysis of experiences included 3. Must use a clear, coherent, thesis statement introducing what your autobiography will be about Reflection/Self-Assessment (Total: 4 points) ?

This will be due after you have written your autobiography and we have talked about their completion as a class. It will include a one-page reflection on what you have learned form writing this autobiography, what you liked about the assignment, and what you disliked about the assignment. ? This is an easy 4 points to get towards your final grade for the project. You already did the work – now tell me what you think about it! **So for the Racial Autobiography assignment as a whole, you will receive a ___/8 (4 points for the autobiography and 4 points for the reflection).

I will also give you a % grade and a letter grade that corresponds) Standards: ¦ Rubric (http://www. campus. com/rubricshowc. cfm? code=V633X5=yes) (Rubric created on iRubric website – printouts will be attached to GRASPS handout) Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 24 Resources and Work's Cited: Useful Websites: ? EdChange – (Edchange. org) This website provides great tools for overcoming racism in schools and promoting diversity in curriculum. ? Media Awareness Netwrok – (media-awareness. ca) provides an extensive list of resources for digital media literacy. This program seeks to help educaters, families, and other organizations produce awareness of the responsible way o comsume media.

ReadWriteThink – (readwritethink. org) – Another great resource for lesson planning, professional development, and grade-appropriate planning ideas. Useful articles and books: Pollock, M (2008). Everyday antiracism: getting real about race in school New York: The New Press. Tatum, B. (1992) Talking about racism, learning about race: The application of racial identitdy development theory. Harvard Educational Review. 62 (1) Tatum, B. (1997) Why are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? Basic Books. New York. Products of Our Town: Using Theory to Create Racial Identity Autobiographies and Explore Social Justice 25

Racial Autobiography Curriculum Unit essay

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