A limited time offer!

urgent 3h delivery guaranteed

English: Literature and Common Courses

UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT (Abstract) BA Programme in English under Choice based credit semester systemSchool of Distance Education/ Private mode- Syllabus in tune with Choice based credit semester System School of Distance Education regulations-approved implemented with effect from 2011 admissionOrders issued  GENERAL AND ACADEMIC BRANCH­IV­‘B’ SECTION  No: GAIV/B2/9842/2010 Dated, Calicut University. P. O 01.

We will write a custom essay sample on English: Literature and Common Courses

or any similar topic only for you

Order Now

09. 2012 Read: 1. UO No GAIV/J2/3601/08 dated 17. 12. 2010 2. UO No GAIV/J2/3601/08 Vol IV dated 10. 05. 2011 3. UO of even no dated 08. 5. 2012 4. UO Note EX IV/1/Setting/Gen/2011 dated 25. 05. 2012 and Letter no SDE/C3/7144/2011 dated 02. 06. 2012 5. Letter SDE/C3/7144/2011 dated 06. 07. 2012 6. Email message forwarded by the Board of Studies Chairman English(U. G) along with the English(UG) Syllabus on 09. 08. 2012 7. Notes made by the Assistant Registrar in file of even no dated 09. 08. 2012 and telephonic conversation with the Board of Studies Chairman English(U. G) on 09. 08. 2012 8. Soft and hard copies of the Syllabus handed over by the Chairman,Board of Studies in English(UG) on 22. 08. 2012 ORDER

Vide paper read first above , Choice based credit semester system and grading has been introduced for UG Programmes under School of Distance Education/ Private mode of the University with effect from 2011 admission onwards. Vide paper read second above, Orders were issued to implement the additions to clause1 of the Regulations governing the Choice based credit semester system UG Programmes in School of Distance Education/ Private mode as follows 1 The Syllabus of UG Programmes under Choice based credit semester system will be the same for the Regular, School of Distance Education and Private mode.

The number of courses and credits of School of Distance Education/ Private mode will be the same as that of Regular Programme except for BA Programmes. For BA Programmes there will be one complimentary course in each semester with 4 credits. The complimentary course in 1st and 4th semesters and 2nd and 3rd semesters will be the same. Vide paper read third the Syllabus of BA Programme in English under Choice based credit semester system in School of Distance Education/ Private mode was implemented with effect from 2011 admission.

Vide paper read fourth EX IV Section , Pareeksha Bhavan and Director School of Distance Education had highlighted a few discrepancies in the Syllabus of English(UG) Choice based credit semester system School of Distance Education with effect from 2011 admission. Vide paper read fifth the Director, School of Distance Education sought clarifications again in the complementary course offered by School of Distance Education and remarked that the complementary course English for Communication is not offered for any of UG Programmes under School of Distance Education .

Taking into consideration the discrepancies noted by the Pareeksha Bhavan and Director School of Distance Education the Board of Studies Chairman English(UG) had forwarded a corrected version of the syllabus of BA English Choice based credit semester system School of Distance Education with effect from 2011 admission vide paper read as sixth above. On verification of the syllabus it was found that in page 5 and 6 clause 12 examinations Internal assessment reads as 25% and end semester external examination reads as 75% which does not go along with the School of Distance Education Regulations.

The Board of Studies Chairman English UG was informed the same as per paper read seventh above. Vide paper read eight the corrected version of the soft and hard copies of syllabus of BA English Choice based credit semester system School of Distance Education with effect from 2011 admission was forwarded by the Chairman Board of Studies in English(U. G) 2 Orders are therefore issued implementing the syllabus of BA English Choice based credit semester system in School of Distance Education/ Private mode with effect from 2011 admission in tune with

Choice based credit semester system regulations. Orders are issued accordingly. School of Distance Education The U. O read third above stands modified to this extent. The Syllabus is uploaded in the University website. Sd/                                                                                          ASSISTANT REGISTRAR (G&A? IV)                                                                                                        For REGISTRAR To  The Director,   School of  Distance Education. Copy to:? Controller of Examination. / Ex.

Section/EG Section/DR/AR        BA Branch/Tabulation Section/ Enquiry/                    System Administrator with a request to upload the syllabus in  the University Website/ G & A I ‘F’ section/                    Library/SF/DF/FC                                                                                                                                                                          Forwarded/By Order  Sd/SECTION OFFICER. 3 B A Programme in –EnglishUnder CCSS-in School of Distance Education / Private mode – Syllabus – Implemented with effect from 2011 admission UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT BOARD OF STUDIES IN ENGLISH, UG RESTRUCTURE D CURRICULUM FOR COMMON COURSES 1-6, CORE COURSES, ELECTIVES & OPEN COURSES PREAMBLE 1. PHILOSOPHY The massive curriculum restructuring of the undergraduate programme undertaken by the University of Calicut envisages a thorough revamp of the existing one in concept, structure, content, spirit and methodology. The attempt is not to ‘sever the cord and shed the scales’ or to throw overboard the great legacy of the past, but to establish a stronger link with it in a more meaningful way.

The three principles that govern a UG programme are: greater emphasis on methodology, interdisciplinarity and academic freedom. All these factors together should be able to contribute to the attainment of the larger goals viz. to develop communication skills, to foster essential sensibility to cherish and appreciate aesthetic values across borders, to inculcate the essential sensitivity to social concerns, to prepare for specialized study, and ultimately to develop a holistic personality in students.

The structure of an Undergraduate Programme comprises ten Common Courses, Core Courses (including two Methodology Courses, Informatics, an Elective and a Project), Complementary Courses and an Open Course. 2. COMMON COURSES (IN ENGLISH) 1-6: The Common Courses include courses in English and other languages as well as courses specifically intended to create an interest in and to facilitate a serious discussion about vital societal and environmental issues and to promote the spirit of scientific enquiry.

Language Courses are intended to encourage reading of the various genres of literature in English and other languages. They are also intended to train the students in various kinds of reading using appropriate literary strategies. However, the teaching of language at this level is not limited to teaching of literature or teaching of language through literature alone. Knowledge content is also seen as equally important in the study of language. Since every language is a vast repository of knowledge, language teaching should also aim at developing a person’s ability to use it in a precise and effective manner.

It can be seen that the restructured curriculum in its attempt to redefine the approach to language study has in fact enhanced the space for the study of language and literature in the common courses. 5 The broad objectives of the new common courses are: developing communicative competence and enhancing intellectual ability and aesthetic sensibility with a larger focus on inculcating human values. Care has been taken to see that the new curricula meet the linguistic, intellectual and cultural requirements of the students.

These foundation courses have been widely felt andappreciated to be sufficient to develop the core competencies in a student to undergo an undergraduate programme of his/her choice and to help him/her pursue lifelong academic, cultural and economic activities. On completion of these courses, a student should be able to: • • • • • • • Master communication skills in English with fluency and accuracy. Approach an issue from various points of view, and develop the habit of questioning varied views critically and objectively.

Perform academic writings and make academic presentations precisely, logically and effectively Teach himself how far literary language deviates from ordinary language Have a general understanding of India’s constitution and its secular and plural traditions leading to an increased awareness of the value and spirit of comradeship, patriotism and national integration. Analyze environmental issues in the right perspective and recognize the need for adopting strategies for sustainable development.

Have an overall understanding of some of the major issues in the contemporary world and respond empathetically as a learned citizen. Realize that science is a human endeavor based on facts and proven results, without taking recourse to any supernatural power or influence and discern the kind of socio-political environment which encourages scientific enquiry and that which stifles it. 4. CORE COURSES Restructuring a system that has stood for a wide span of time and moulded generations past and present is no easy task.

However, a duty that was initiated more than two years ago immediately after the present Board of Studies assumed charge, and carried forward with much enthusiasm, had a natural happy ending when the forty-odd teachers from various colleges and the members of the Board met at a five-day workshop at the University in January-February 2009. The newly restructured curriculum for BA English Language and Literature is a product of that workshop though the later readings of the papers have necessitated slight modifications in the outline and content of the original draft.

Framing of courses like the Methodology of Humanities and the Methodology of Literature is a totally new experience to UG curriculum designers in Kerala. The introduction of a stream-wise methodology course assumes significance as it is neither feasible nor desirable to teach everything even within a subject area. Moreover, subject boundaries have to be constantly crossed to explore the possibilities for the production of new knowledge. The methodology of the area of discipline helps a student explore further on his own in his chosen field of specialization. The study of Informatics renders the much needed modern day ICT tools.

The four courses on READING envisage hands-on training in theoretical literary readings. Language and Criticism courses have been shaped to include more advanced areas in the field. The modern English literature course is designed to render a purely English flavour whereas interdisciplinary areas and other literatures 6 would present a comparison and contrast , making learners aware of the fact that other flavours are also equally palatable and relishing. Special care has been taken to see that the teaching learning materials encourage intercultural dialogue wherever possible.

The course in Writing for the Media would give the necessary cutting-edge tool for many. A project equivalent to a full course is a novelty. Detailed guidelines for the project would be issued in due course. 3. a. CORE COURSES FOR BA DOUBLE MAIN PROGRAMMES WITH ENGLISH The Double Main Programmes (with English as one of the mains) will have English as Core Course A and the other main as Core Course B. Such Programmes also have a compulsory component of ten Common Courses (38 credits), two Core components (A&B) consisting of nine Core Courses each, electives, and projects (78 credits) and an Open Course (4credits). . COMPLEMENTARY COURSES Complementary courses (hitherto known as Subsidiary papers) are no longer seen as subsidiary or second rate. The study of these courses is intended to encourage interdisciplinarity and to expose the students to the possibilities in other disciplines. It also enriches the study of the core subjects. In BA Programmes , there will be one complementary course in each semester with 4 credits. The complementary course in 1st and 4th semesters as well as in 2nd and 3rd semesters will be the same. 5.

OPEN COURSES Besides the Complementary Courses, a student will be required to choose in the Fifth Semester an Open Course from a discipline of his or her choice to further consolidate the flair for interdisciplinary approach he/she has already acquired at the beginning of the programme of study. 6. ELECTIVES Electives, offered in the Sixth Semester, are the frontier areas of a specialized discipline. The courses such as World Classics in Translation and Regional Literatures in Translation should further widen the horizons of knowledge and lead students to fresh woods and pastures new. . APPROACH TO CURRICULUM DESIGN Unlike in the past where the unintelligible topic descriptions on crumpled sheets of paper fondly called syllabus undergo various evolutions in the hands of students, teachers and the question paper setters who finally seal the fate of the syllabus, the curriculum materials contained herein are so designed that a predetermined educational experience as set out in the course objectives is delivered. 7 8. CURRICULAR TRANSACTIONS RING OUT THE OLD RING IN THE NEW The current practice of curricular transactions has to be given a farewell.

Old practices such as dictation of notes are to be frowned upon. Carefully guided home assignments that are well-followed up, reinforced by well-monitored activities/projects individual/group, discussions, seminars, presentations and other modern techniques should make classes lively, imparting the joy of learning. The specific requirements of below average students who have failed to learn their lessons in the lower classes and of students who learn a particular language for minimal social interactions are to be met using the space and time outside the common classrooms. 9.

USE OF ICT Various tools available in ICT are to be optimally utilized wherever possible. Effective use of Language Lab in skills training and spoken English drills yields marvelous results. Meticulously planned screening sessions of plays/films, replay of poetry recitals, recording of famous speeches etc are to be resorted to make the class rooms lively and effective. 10. COMMUNICATING THE SPIRIT OF THE CURRICULUM This curriculum represents a major change from the trodden path, demanding positive readjustments from various stake holders: the university administration, teachers, students and parents.

Effective motivating sessions and course-wise workshops should be organized by the university for the benefit of the teachers. It is recommended that the university print the syllabi and upload it on the university website. 11. CONTACT HOURS As per the university regulations, the total number of contact hours for a course is 18 (weeks) x 4 hours/week = 72 hrs or 18 x 5 h/w = 90 hrs. However, it should be possible for a student to set apart 2-3 hours of self study per day over 18 weeks which will total around 375 hours of self study/semester. 2. EXAMINATIONS 1) There shall be University Examination at the end of each semester. For practical convenience, 1st and 2nd semester examinations may be conducted at the end of 2nd semester only. 2) The theory examination of each course will be of three hours duration. It shall contain two parts (Internal and External). The internal examination will be conducted with 20 multiple choice questions and OMR answer sheet, at the beginning for 15 minutes. The rest 2 hours and 45 minutes is utilized for the external examination of that course. ) The external question paper may contain short answer type, paragraph type and essay type questions. 8 4) Different types of questions shall possess different weightage to quantify their range. Weightage can vary from course to course depending on their comparative importance. EVALUATION AND GRADING 1. The evaluation scheme for each course shall contain two parts. i) Internal evaluation (20%) ii) External evaluation (80%) The weightage of internal and external evaluation is as follows. Evaluation Internal External Weightage 1 (20%) 4 (80%) Both internal and external evaluation will be done using Direct Grading system. 13.

DIRECT GRADING SYSTEM Direct Grading System based on a 5 point scale is used to evaluate the performance (External and Internal) of students. Letter Grade A B C D E Performance Excellent Very Good Good Average Poor Grade Point 4 3 2 1 0 Grade Range 3. 50 to 4. 00 2. 50 to 3. 49 1. 50 to 2. 49 0. 50 to 1. 49 0. 00 to 0. 49 14. DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES FOR UG PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH There are 5/6 courses in each semester and a total of 35 courses spread over six semesters. 1-10 Common Courses 11-24 Core Courses 25 Elective 26 Open Course 27 Project 28-35 Complementary Courses 9 15. OUTLINE OF COMMON COURSES Course Code A01 A02 No. f Contact Hours/Week 4 5 No. of Credits 3 3 Semester in which course to be taught 1 1 Title of Course Communication Skills In English Critical Reasoning, Writing & Presentation Reading Literature in English Readings on Indian Constitution, Secularism & Sustainable Environment Literature and Contemporary Issues History and Philosophy of Science Communication Skill in the additional language Translation and Communication in the additional language Literature in the additional Language Culture and Civilization (with a compulsory component on Kerala culture) A03 A04 4 5 4 4 2 2 A05 5 4 3 A06 A07 A08 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 A09 A10 5 5 4 4 3 4 10 16. OUTLINE OF THE CORE COURSES No. of Contact No. of Hours/Week Course Code Title of Course Credits in which CC To be taught 1 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 Semester EN1B1 EN2B1 EN3B1 EN3B2 EN4B1 EN4B2 EN5B1 EN5B2 EN5B3 Methodology of Humanities Methodology of Literature Informatics Reading Prose Reading Poetry Reading Fiction Reading Drama Language and Linguistics Literary Criticism and Theory Literatures in English: American & Postcolonial Project* (to be continued in Semester 6) Women’s Writing Modern English Literature Indian Writing in English Writing for the Media 6 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 EN5B4 5 4 5 EN5B5(Pr) EN6B1 EN6B2 EN6B3 EN6B4 2 5 5 5 5 3 0 4 4 4 4 2 5 6 6 6 6 6 EN6B5E(1/2/3) Elective (See table in 18 below) EN6B6(Pr) Project * 2 4 6 * The four (4) credits for the Project is to be considered only in Semester 6 11 17. CORE COURSES IN ENGLISH FOR DOUBLE MAIN PROGRAMMES WITH ENGLISH AS ONE OF THE COMPLEMENTS No. of Contact Hours/Week Course Code Title of Course Semester in No. of which to be Credits taught.

DMEN1B1 DMEN2B1 DMEN3B1 DMEN3B2 DMEN4B1 DMEN5B1 DMEN5B2 -DMEN5B3(Pr) DMEN6B1 DMEN6B2 DMEN6B3E(1/2/3) Methodology of Literature Reading Prose Reading Poetry Reading Fiction Reading Drama Language and Linguistics Literary Criticism and Theory Open Course Project * Modern English Literature Indian Writing in English Elective (See table in 18 below) Project * 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 5 5 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 2 1 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 DMEN6B6(Pr) 0 2 6 * The Projects in Core Courses A and B are to be completed in Sem 5 and Sem 6 respectively.

Bur the credits (2 x 2 = 4) are to be considered only in Semester 6 12 18. OUTLINE OF ELECTIVES ELECTIVES Course Code No. of Contact Hours/Week 3 3 3 No. of Credits Semester in which El. is to be taught 6 6 6 Title of Course EN6B5E1 EN6B5E2 EN6B5E3 World Classics in Translation Regional Literatures in Translation Dalit Literature 2 2 2 19. OUTLINE OF OPEN COURSES OPEN COURSES FOR STUDENTS OF OTHER DISCIPLINES Course Code No. of Contact Hours/Week No. of Credits Semester in which OC is to be taught 5 5 5 Title of Course

EN5D01 EN5D02 EN5D03 Film Studies Creative Writing in English Applied Language Skills 3 3 3 4 4 4 20. LIST OF COMPLEMENTARY COURSES (As per the decision of the Steering Committee on CCSS UG held on 29/06/2011, the list of complementary courses of English Programme of Choice based Credit Semester System under SDE of Calicut University w. e. f. 2011is as follows. ) English Political Science/Indian Constitution Politics/Modern World History Social and Cultural History of Britain and I and IV semesters II and III Semesters OR

English Journalism/History of Journalism Mass Communication/Modern Indian History I and IV semesters II and III Semesters 13 21. BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE COURSES (SEMESTER-WISE) SEMESTER 1 Course Code A01 A02 Title of Course No. of Contact Hours/Week 4 5 No. of Credits 3 3 Communication Skills in English Critical Reasoning, Writing & Presentation Communication Skill in the additional language Methodology of Humanities Complementary Paper A07 EN1B1 4 6 6 4 4 4 Total 25 18 SEMESTER 2 Course Code A03 A04 Title of Course No. f Contact Hours/Week 4 5 No. of Credits 4 4 Reading Literature in English Readings on Indian Constitution, Secularism & Sustainable Environment Translation and Communication in the additional language Methodology of Literature Complementary Paper Total A08 EN2B1 4 6 6 25 4 4 4 20 14 SEMESTER 3 Course Code A05 A09 EN3B1 EN3B2 Title of Course Literature and Contemporary Issues Literature in the additional language Informatics Reading Prose Complementary Paper No. of Contact Hours/Week 5 5 4 5 6 No. of Credits 4 4 4 4 4 Total 25 20

SEMESTER 4 Course Code Title of Course No. of Contact Hours/Week 5 5 5 4 6 No. of Credits 4 4 4 4 4 A06 A10 EN4B1 EN4B2 History and Philosophy of Science Culture and Civilization Reading Poetry Reading Fiction Complementary Paper Total 25 20 15 SEMESTER 5 Course Code EN5B1 EN5B2 EN5B3 EN5B4 EN5B5(Pr) —–Title of Course Reading Drama Language and Linguistics Literary Criticism and Theory Literatures in English: American & Postcolonial Project* (to be contd in Sem 6) Open Course Total SEMESTER 6 Course Code Title of Course No. f Contact Hours/Week 5 5 5 5 3 2 25 No. of Credits 4 4 4 4 2 4 22 No. of contact Hours/week 5 5 5 5 2 3 25 No. of Credits 4 4 4 4 0 4 20 EN6B1 EN6B2 EN6B3 EN6B4 EN6B5E(1/2/3) EN6B6(Pr) Women’s Writing Modern English Literature Indian Writing in English Writing for the Media Elective Project * Total 16 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN ENGLISH COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT

A01 COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN ENGLISH 1 3 72 (4 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS MODULE – I 1. Listening: Sounds, Stress and Intonation a) Phonemic symbols: Vowels – Diphthongs – Trip thongs – Consonants b) Stress: Syllables – Word Stress – Stress in Monosyllables – Stress in Polysyllables – Stress in words used as different Parts of Speech – Stress in compound words – Stress – Sentence Stress. c) Strong forms – Weak forms – Contracted forms d) Intonation: Falling Intonation and Rising Intonation 2.

Listening Skills: Barriers to listening – Academic listening – Listening to talks and descriptions – Listening to announcements – Listening to news on the radio and Television – Listening to casual conversations MODULE – II Speaking: Word Stress and Rhythm – Weak Forms and Strong forms – Pauses and Sense Groups – Falling and Rising tones – Fluency and pace of Delivery – Problem Sounds – Different Accents (British and American) – Influence of Mother Tongue MODULE- III Communication Skills 1.

What is communication? – importance of the situation (formal, semi-formal, informal – spoken and written communication – essentials of effective communication – Greeting and Introducing – Making requests – Asking for permission – Giving and denying 17 permission – Offering and accepting help – Asking for and declining help – giving instructions and directions 2.

Telephone Skills: Understanding Telephone conversation – Handling calls – Leaving Message – making requests – Asking for and Giving permission – Giving instructions 3) Discussion Skills: Giving your opinion agreeing and disagreeing, Explaining, Making suggestions – Interrupting – Questioning – Reporting – Dealing with questions MODULE – IV Reading Surveying a textbook – scanning – using an index – reading with a purpose – making predictions about your reading – Surveying a chapter – unfamiliar words – connections between facts and ideas – locating main points – understanding text structure – making inferences – reading graphics – identifying view points – reading critically – analyzing argument Note on Course Work The course work should give emphasis to the practice of the skills of listening, speaking, and reading undertaken both as classroom activity and as homework. 4. READING LIST A) FURTHER READING Sl. No 1

Title Study Listening: A Course in Listening to Lectures and Note-taking (Book with Audio CD) Study Speaking: A Course in Spoken English for Academic Purposes (Book with Audio CD) Spoken English Part I & II A Foundation Course for Speakers of Malayalam Oxford Guide to Effective Writing and Speaking Author Tony Lynch Publisher & Year Cambridge University Press (2008) Cambridge University 2008 Press, 2 Kenneth Anderson, Joan Maclean and Tony Lynch Kamlesh Sadanand, & Susheela Punitha John Seely 3 4 Orient Longman Pvt Ltd (2008) New Delhi, OUP, 2007 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) 18 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES CRITICAL REASONING, WRITING & PRESENTATION COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT A02 CRITICAL REASONING, PRESENTATION 1 3 90 (5 hrs/wk) WRITING & NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS

COURSE OUTLINE MODULE – I Introduction to Critical Thinking: Benefits of Critical Thinking – Barriers to Critical Thinking – Deductive and Inductive Reasoning – Recognizing Arguments – Identifying flaws in arguments – Evaluation of Arguments – – fallacies of relevance & insufficient evidence – Evaluating and using sources of information – Social influences on thinking – Persuasion Conformity – Prejudices MODULE – II Language of Critical thinking: Characteristics of Critical and Analytical Writing – Precision, avoidance of vagueness, over-generality, ambiguity. Sense of audience, Clarity, Selection, Sequencing, Sign posting, Conventions, Evaluating Critical Writing MODULE III A) Resources: Using the Library – Net Sources – Reading for Writing B) The Writing Process: Background to writing Developing plans from titles – Evaluating a text – Understanding Purpose and Register – Selecting key points – note making – paraphrasing – summary writing – combining sources – Planning a text – organizing paragraphs – organizing main body – introductions – conclusions – re-reading and rewriting – proof reading C) Elements of Writing: Cause and effect – cohesion – comparison – definitions – discussion – examples – generalization – Numbers – references and quotations – style – synonyms – visual information MODULE IV A) Accuracy in Writing: Abbreviation – adverbs – articles – caution – conjunctions – formality in verbs 19 – modal verbs – Nationality language – nouns and adjectives –countable and uncountable nouns – Passives – Prefixes and suffixes – Prepositions – Prepositions after verbs – Punctuation –– Referring verbs – Relative pronouns – Singular/plural – Tenses – Time words and phrases.

B) Writing Models: Formal letters – Curriculum Vitae/Covering Letter – Designing and Reporting Surveys – Seminar Papers – Project Reports – Documentation MODULE – V A) Soft Skills for Academic Presentations: Theory – The audience – primary and secondary and their knowledge and expectations – the objective of the presentation – choosing the appropriate medium for presentation techniques of effective presentation – Structuring the presentation visual presentation aids – handouts – Power point presentation – L. C. D Clarity and persuasion – Non verbal communication – Opening and Closing – Time Management. 3. A) READING LIST FURTHER READING Sl. No 1 2 Title Critical Thinking Skills Author Stella Cottrell Publisher & Year 3 4 5 6 7 8 Palgrave Macmillan, 2005 Critical Thinking: A Student’s Gregory Bassham, McGraw-Hill, 2006 nd Introduction, 2 Edition William Irwin, Henry Nardone, James M.

Wallace Critical Thinking: Learn the Richard Paul and Pearson Education, Tools the Best Thinkers Use Linda Elder 2006 Thinking Skills John Butterworth Cambridge & Geoff Thwaites University Press, 2006 th Keys to Successful Writing, 4 Marilyn Anderson Pearson Longma Edition Study Writing: A Course in Liz-Hamp-Lyons & Cambridge Writing Skills for Academic Ben Heasly University Press, Purposes 2007 Oxford Guide to Effective John Seely New Delhi, OUP, Writing and Speaking 2007 Presentation Skills for Students Joan Van Emden & Palgrave Lucinda Becker Macmillan, 2004 5. WEB RESOURCES • • • www. criticalthinking. org http://www. ou. edu/ouphil/faculty/chris/crmscreen. pdf www. thinkersway. com 20 6. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES READING LITERATURE IN ENGLISH COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT A03 READING LITERATURE IN ENGLISH 2 4 72 (4 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS COURSE OUTLINE MODULE 1: PROSE 1. Dr. S. Radhakrishnan 2. Bertrand Russell 3. Aldous Huxley 4.

Anne Frank MODULE 2: POETRY 1. Edmund Spenser 2. Maya Angelou 3. Abraham Lincoln His Son’s Teacher 4. Mina Asadi 5. Dilip Chitre 6. H. W. Longfellow 7. Lewis Carroll 8. Sylvia Plath MODULE 3: SHORT STORY 1. Maxim Gorky 2. Bessie Head 3. Natsume Soseki MODULE 4: DRAMA : Humanities vs. Science : How to Escape from Intellectual Rubbish : The Beauty Industry : An extract from The Diary of a Young Girl : One Day I wrote Her Name : A Poor Girl : Abraham Lincoln’s Letter to : A Ring to Me is Bondage : Father Returning Home : A Slave’s Dream : The Walrus and the Carpenter : Mirror : One Autumn Night : Heaven is not Closed : I Am a Cat 21 1. A. A. Milne 2. Fritz Karinthy The Boy Comes Home : Refund 4. READING LIST CORE TEXT 1. Reading Literature in English K. Narayan Chandran Foundation Books, 2009 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES READINGS ON INDIAN CONSTITUTION, SECULAR STATE & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE A04 PROSE READINGS ON INDIAN CONSTITUTION, SECULARISM & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT 2 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS COURSE OUTLINE MODULE 1 INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND SECULARISM 1 . Ambedkar’s Speech On 4 Th November 1948 In The Constituent Assembly 2.

Concluding speech of Ambedkar delivered on 25 th November 1949. 3. Secularism in India Asghar Ali Engineer 4. The Executive and the Judiciary Andre Beteille 5. Signs Of Change S. Viswanathan 6. Deep Roots J. B. Kripalani 7. When The Press Fails In Its Duty Ajit Bhattacharjea. 8. The Choice Before us Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. 9. A Dialogue on Democracy A. S. Hornby 10. Democratic Model for India Subhash C. Kasyap 11 The Making of the Constitution L. M. Singhvi MODULE II SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT 1. Arundhathi Roy : The End of Imagination (Essay) 22 2. 3. Medha Patkar : A Different Kind of Development (Essay) Kiss of Life for Mother Earth : Prophets of New India (Essay) 4.

Krishna Kumar : Green Schools in a Greying World (Essay) 5. Chief Seattle (Narrative) : The End of Living and the Beginning of Survival 6. Romila Thapar : Forests and Settlements (Essay) 7. Amitav Ghosh : The Hungry Tide (Short Story) 8. Deep Ecology –A New Paradigm :  Fritjof Capra 4. CORE TEXT (A text containing the above lessons will be made available) 5. MODEL QUESTIONS (To be incorporated) UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES LITERATURE AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT A05 LITERATURE AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 3 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) NO.

OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS COURSE OUTLINE MODULE – I ‘GLOBALIZATION’ AND ITS CONSEQUENCES (ESSAYS) 1. Fighting Indiscriminate Globalisation : Vandana Siva 2. Riches : Ramachandra Guha 3. Sharing the World : Amartya Sen 4. Confronting Empire : Arundhati Roy 5. Villages for Sale in Vidharbha : Dionne Bunsha 6. Future of Our Past : Satchidanandan MODULE – II – HUMAN RIGHTS 1. Basic Rights: : Malini Sheshadri ,Hema Nair 2. Disgrace: : Swami Wahind Kazmi 3. Labels Everywhere: : Sunder Ramaswamy 4. Under my Napkin? In Sky? In Trees? A Child’s questions: Susan Biskebone 5. The Tree of Violence: : Namadeo Dhasal MODULE –III 23 THE GENDER QUESTION 1.

Dinner for the Boss : Bisham Sahni 2. Learning to be a Mother : Sashi Despande 3. Aruna : Rinki Battacharya 4. Medea : Nabneeta Dev Sen 5. Organising for Change : Ela Bhatt 6. Child Marriages are Linked to Poverty : Usha Rai 7. The Summimg Up 4. READING LIST : Kamala Das CORE TEXT Reading and reality Malini Seshadri and Hema Nair 2009 5. MODEL QUESTIONS (To be incorporated) UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES SYLLABI FOR COMMON COURSES HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE COURSE CODE A06 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE OUP TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS 4 4 90 (5 hrs/wk)

COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I ANCIENT HISTORY OF SCIENCE Introduction to history and philosophy of science – What is science – Origins of scientific enquiry – European origins of science – Early India – China – Arabs MODULE II SCIENCE IN MIDDLE AGES Europe 1450 1550 – Fall of Aristotle – Bruno, Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes – Medical sciences – Advancement in India – Modern scientific outlook 24 MODULE III MODERN SCIENCE Newton – Contemporaries – Mathematics – Industrial Revolution – French Revolution – Scientific Determinism – Modern medicine – Microbiology – Darwin – Genome – Electron, Atom, Nuclear physics Information Technology, Biotechnology, Nano Technology MODULE IV PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE What is philosophy of science – science & pseudo science – Scientific Reasoning: Deduction, Induction; Hume’s problem; Inference; Probability & Induction – Explanation in Science: Symmetry, Irrelevance, Explanation vs. ausality& reduction Realism And Antirealism – Scientific Change And Scientific Revolutions – Philosophical Problems In Physics, Biology And Psychology – Science And Its Critics: Scientism – Science and Religion – Darwin on Trial: A Case study – Science and Society – People’s Science – Response to Criticisms 4. READING LIST a) CORE TEXT Sl. No 1 Title History and Philosophy of Science Authors R. V. G. Menon Publisher & Year Pearson Longman, 2009 b) FURTHER READING Sl. No 1 2 3 History of Technology Title Science Author and R. V. G. Menon Publisher & Year Calicut University Central Coop Stores, 2002 Gupta Pearson Longman New York, 2002 OUP, History and Philosophy of P. K. Sen Science (Gen. Ed) Philosophy of Science: A Very Okasha Samir Short Introduction 5. MODEL QUESTIONS (To be incorporated) 25

UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES METHODOLOGY OF HUMANITIES COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN1B1 METHODOLOGY OF HUMANITIES I 4 108 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I Introduction – difference between the natural, social and the human sciences – facts and interpretation – history and fiction – study of the natural world compared to the study of the subjective world – study of tastes, values and belief system – the question of ideology CORE READING Terry Eagleton. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell, 1983. Chapter: ‘What is Literature? ’ EH Carr. What is History? Ed 2. London, Macmillan. 1986. – 24, 50-80 (Chapter 1: The Historian and His Facts & Chapter 3: History, Science and Morality) GENERAL READING Peter Widdowson. Literature. London, Routledge. 1999 MODULE II Language, Culture and Identity – the relation between language, culture and subjectivity – the question of agency in language – the social construction of reality – language in history – language in relation to class, caste, race and gender – language and colonialism CORE READING Peter L Berger and Thomas Luckmann, The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1966. 13-30. Introduction J. G. Merquior, From Prague to Paris. London: Verso, 1986. 10-17, Chapter 1, 26

Sections ‘The Linguistic Paradigm’ and ‘From Language to Culture GENERAL READING Rosalind Coward and John Ellis, Language and Materialism. London: Routledge, 1977. MODULE III Narration and representation – reality and/as representation – narrative modes of thinking – narration in literature, philosophy and history – textuality and reading CORE READING Shlomith Rimmon Kenan, Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics. London: Methuen, 1981. Chapter 1. Javed Akhtar, “The Syntax of Secularism in Hindi Cinema,” in Composite Culture in a Multi-cultural Society, ed. Bipan Chandra and Sucheta Mahajan. New Delhi: NBT and Pierson, 2007. 265-72. GENERAL READING Linda M Shires and Steven Cohen, Telling Stories. London: Methuen, 85

MODULE IV Indian theories of knowledge – Methodologies of Indian knowledge systems – what is knowledge – concepts of knowledge in the Indian tradition – origin and development of Indian philosophical systems CORE READING M. Hiriyanna. Outlines of Indian Philosophy. London. 1956. Chapters 1 & 2. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya. Indian Philosophy: A popular Introduction. New Delhi, Peoples Publishing House, 1982. Chapters 4, 8 & 24. GENERAL READING S. Radhakrishnan. Indian Philosophy. 2 vols. London, 1943. Note on Course work The teaching of the course will involve making the student enter into a sort of dialogue with some of the issues raised in the reading material given below.

While the student should be encouraged to read the recommended section of the text or the whole text outside the class hours, representative excerpts from individual texts may be used for intensive reading in the class. 4. COURSE TEXT Sl. No 1 Title Authors Publisher & Year Methodolog y and Perspectives Abhijit Kundu & Pearson Longman, of Humanities Pramod Nayar 2009 (To be incorporated) 27 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES METHODOLOGY OF LITERATURE COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN2B1 METHODOLOGY OF LITERATURE 2 4 108 (6 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS

COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I Traits of Literature: What forms literature? How is literature different from other discourses? – Canon Formation: Who determines taste? How are certain works and authors marginalized? – English literatures: British, American, African, Indian, Canadian, Australian etc. MODULE II Textual approaches: New criticism,Formalism, Close Reading, Deconstruction, Reader response – Psychoanalytic: Freud, Lacan and Zizek (not the heavy jargon but reading possibilities) – Archetypal: Unconscious and universal patterns of repetition MODULE III Gender: Marginalized genders – Ethnic: Marginalization of aboriginals, how their culture is demolished and specimens? Subaltern: A unique Indian phenomenon, Dalit literature, marginalization MODULE IV Post colonial: How texts are reread? Quest for expression, assertion of nationalism with special reference to India and Arica – Cultural studies: Cultural Materialism, New Historicism, Marxism, Postmodernism – Eco-critical: Awareness of nature and environment, eco-feminism Approach The approach has to be open and flexible in sensibility, avoiding judicious judgments. Instead of offering rigid definitions and 28 descriptions, the teacher is to stimulate thinking process and help students form positions through familiar examples. A few poems (or stories) are to be selected and read from different theoretical frames so that the student can grasp how one contrasts with the other.

Classes may be devoted to simple explication of the methodologies followed by practical illustrations of the application of the methodologies on short works and finally, student assignments on these lines. 4. READING LIST A) CORE TEXT (A text containing the above lessons will be made available) B) FURTHER READING Sl No 1 2 3 Title Principles Criticism of Author Literary S. Ravindranathan Publisher/Year Chennai, 1993 Emerald, A Handbook of Critical Wilfred L. Guerin, Earle Delhi, OUP, 2006 Approaches to Literature Labor, et al Contemporary Criticism: An V. S. Sethuraman (ed) Chennai, Macmillan, Anthology 1989 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) 29

UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES INFORMATICS COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN3B1 INFORMATICS 3 4 72 (4 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS 1. AIMS OF THE COURSE • This course introduces students to all the different aspects of Information Technology and Computers that an educated citizen of the modern world may be expected to know of and use in daily life. The topics in the syllabus are to be presented as much as possible with a practical orientation so that the student is given a perspective that will help him to use and master technology. 2.

OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE Upon completion of the course: • The student will have a thorough general awareness of Computer hardware and software from a practical perspective. • The student will have good practical skill in performing common basic tasks with the computer. 4. COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I: GENERAL INTRODUCTION Outline history of the development of computers – Types of computersPC/ Workstations – Laptops – Palmtops – Mobile Devices – Notebooks Mainframes –Supercomputers – Significance of IT and the Internet MODULE II: INTRODUCTION TO BASIC HARDWARE Monitor – CRT and LCD – issues – CPU-mouse-keyboard-processor types – Ports – USB 2. 0 – Input-output devices – Printers-scanners-graphic tablet-thumb drive- modems-digital cameras-microphones-speakers. Bluetooth devices MODULE III: INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE

Topics: Operating Systems – Windows- Windows versions- Linux – Linux distributions- Free software- software licenses – Software Tools 30 (applications) – Windows software tools- Word, PowerPoint, Excel Linux tools – Open Office, etc. Security issues- viruses – antivirus tools. MODULE IV: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORKING AND THE INTERNET What is Networking – LAN- WAN- Wireless networks – Benefits of Networking- file sharing- sharing of printers- examples – networking in an office- in an internet cafe. The Internet- HTML- websites – blogs search engines- e-mail- chat- wikis- social networking- Security issuesHacking- Phishing etc. MODULE V: KNOWLEDGE RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

Encyclopedias – libraries – book sites – journals – content repositories online education – other information sites – internet directories – other information sources – websites of universities and research institutions Online courses and Virtual Universities MODULE VI: COMPUTER LOCALIZATION What is localization – using computers in the local languages in India language packs for operating systems and programs – fonts –Unicode ASCII – keyboard layout issues – software tools for typing local languages – TDIL project. 4. CORE TEXT (A text containing the above lessons will be made available) MODEL QUESTION PAPER(To be incorporated) 31 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES READING PROSE COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS EN3B2 READING PROSE 3 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) 1.

AIM OF THE COURSE • The aim of the course is to enhance the level of critical thinking of the students to such a degree that the students could critically interact with prose writings from different contexts – social, political, economic, historical and national as subjects conscious of their own socio-historic specificity. 2. OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE • To enable the students to identify the specificities of various modes of prose writing and to equip them to write prose in as many different modes as possible To develop the critical thinking ability of the student to respond to various modes of prose writings in relation to their socio-historic and cultural ontexts. 3. COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I PROSE FORMS Fiction/Short Story/Tales – Autobiography/Biography – Newspaper/Journal Articles – Philosophical/Scientific Essays – Travelogues – Speech Introduce various modes of narrative so as to enable the students to distinguish between them and identify the characteristics specific to each mode. The students must be encouraged to write prose in as many different modes as possible. • MODULE II PROSE READINGS (CORE) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Intizar Husain : Of Studies : A Chronicle of the Peacocks (Short story) (From Individual Society, Pearson Education) 32 3. Paul Krugman: : Grains Gone Wild (http://www. nytimes. om/2008/04/07/opinion/07krugman. html) 4. Martin Luther King, Jr. : Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech (nobelprize. org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1964/kingacceptance. html) 5. Sylvia Nasar : A Quiet Life (Princeton, 1970-90) From Nasar, Sylvia. A Beautiful Mind. London: Faber and Faber, 1998) 6. Omprakash Valmiki : Joothan :A Dalit’s Life (From Individual Society, Pearson Education) 7. E. F. Schumacher : Technology With A Human Face (From Insights. K Elango (ed) 8. Daniel Goleman Elango (ed). Hyderabad, Orient Blackswan, 2009) : Emotional Intelligence (From Insights. K Hyderabad, Orient Blackswan, 2009) : Filming India ( An Interview) (From India Ramin Jahanbegloo. Delhi.

OUP, 2008) : On Good Resolutions (From English : Religion and Civilization (From Writing A : My Dungeon Shook ( From The Fire Next Michael Joseph) 9. Mrinal Sen Revisited by 10. Robert Lynd Essayists, OUP) 11. Mishirul Hassan Nation, Rupa) 12. James Baldwin Time by 4. READING LIST A) CORE TEXT (A text containing the above lessons will be made available) B) FURTHER READING Walter Benjamin: Experience (Essay) (From Marcus Bullock and Michael W. Jennings. ed, Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Volume 1, 1913-1926, Cambridge: The Belknap Press of HUP, 1996) Stephen Hawking: Public Attitude towards Science (Scientific Essay) (From Stephen Hawking: Back Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays. Toronto: Bantam Books, 1993) http://beemp3. om/download. php? file=2740600&song=Public+At titud es+Toward+Science Martin Luther King: I Have a Dream (Speech) (http://www. americanrhetoric. com/speeches/mlkihaveadream. htm) Ngugi Wa Thiong’o: Weep Not, Child, (Fiction). 33 Chennai: B. I. Publications, 2007. Guy De Muapassant: The Diamond Necklace (Short Story) (From Robert Scholes, Nancy R. Comley et al (ed). Elements of Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Essay, Film, ed IV. OUP, 2007. Pages 297-303) James Baldwin: Autobiographical Notes (From Robert Scholes, Nancy R. Comley et al (ed). Elements of Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Essay, Film, ed IV. OUP, 2007. Pages 98 – 102) A. P. J.

Abdul Kalam: Wings of Fire. Hyderabad: Universities Press (India) Private Ltd. 2004. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl. New York: Bantam Books, 1993. Martin Luther King III: Martin Luther King III reflects on his pilgrimage to India. (Newspaper article) (From ‘The Hindu’, Op-Ed Page 11, dated Saturday, March 14, 2009. ) 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) 34 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES READING POETRY COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN4B1 READING POETRY 4 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS

COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I BASIC ELEMENTS OF POETRY Prosody: Rhythm, Meter – Rhyme-hard rhyme, soft rhyme, internal rhyme Alliteration, Assonance – Diction – (Demonstration and Drilling) Forms: Lyric, Ode, Haiku, Tanka, Jintishi, Ghazal, Rubai etc Genres: Narrative Poetry – Epic Poetry – Dramatic Poetry – Satirical Poetry Lyric Poetry Prose Poetry MODULE II READING ENGLISH POETS 1) FOUR POEMS a) b) c) d) 2) 3) 4) 5) Shakespeare : Sonnet 116 Elizabeth Barret Browning : How Do I Love Thee Mattew Arnold : Longing Lord Byron : When We Two Parted : A Valediction Forbidding Mourning : The Affliction of Margaret : Grecian Urn : The Laboratory John Donne Wordsworth John Keats Robert Browning 35 6) Thomas Gray 7) D. H. Lawrence Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard : Mosquito (Note: The first set of ‘Four Poems,’ taken as a single unit, is meant to serve as a formal initiation into the world of poetry. Students should be able to read, understand and appreciate them on their own, without much help from the teacher. A post reading discussion should be centred on aspects such as genre, poet, theme, similarity, contrasts, style, language, metre, rhyme etc. Teaching techniques such as ‘elicitation’ could be mainly resorted to (by way of asking short questions, giving hints etc. ). Written assignments are to be given. Loud reading sessions of the poems would be helpful in many ways. MODULE III POETRY AND PERSPECTIVES 1) Alexander Pushkin 2) Edwin Markham 3) Robert Frost 4) Wole Soyinka 5) Pablo Neruda 6) Maya Angelou 7) Hira Bansode 8) Chinua Achebe 9) Bertolt Brecht 4. READING LIST A) : No Tears : The Man with a Hoe : Birches : Telephone Conversation : Tonight I can Write : I know Why the Caged Bird Sings : Bosom Friend : Refugee Mother and Child : General, Your Tank CORE TEXT (A text containing the above lessons will be made available) B) FURTHER READING : London : 4. 02 p. m. : Psalm Three : Bosnia Tune : Death Mummer : The City : Daddy : Song for Gwydion : Speak, You Also : One Art : Ekalaivan : The Little Mute Boy : Vowels 1)William Blake (2)Suheir Hammad (3)Mahmoud Darwish (4)Joseph Brodsky (5)Jeanette Armstrong (6)Daya Pawar 7) Sylvia Plath (8) R. S. Thomas (9) Paul Celan (10) Elizabeth Bishop (11) Meena Kandasamy (12) Federico Garcia Lorca (13) Arthur Rimbaud 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER 36 (To be incorporated) UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES READING FICTION COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN4B2 READING FICTION 4 4 72 (4 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I – FICTION & NARRATIVE STRATEGIES a) Plot – Character – Atmosphere – Technique – Style – Points of view b) c) d) CORE READING

Fiction as the base for other literary and media writing Difference between long and short fiction – definitions Types of Fiction B. Prasad. A Background to the Study of English Literature, rev. ed. 3. Delhi: Macmillan, 2008. (Pages 193 – 229) Robert Scholes et al (ed). Elements of Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Essay, Film, ed IV. OUP, 2007. (Pages 121 – 140) MODULE II – READING LONG FICTION . Man and the Sea’ by Ernest Hemingway (1951) MODULE III – READING SHORT FICTION 37 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. ‘The Phoenix’ ‘Of white Hairs and Cricket’ ‘Schools and Schools’ ‘The Diamond Necklace’ ‘Miss Brill’ ‘Misery’ : Sylvia Townsend Warner : Rohinton Mistry : O. Henry : Guy de Maupassant : Katherine Mansfield : Anton Chekhov 4. A) READING LIST:FURTHER READING Sl.

Title No 1 Literature, Criticism, and Style: A Practical Guide to Advanced Level English Literature 2 The Rise of the Novel 3 4 5 Rhetoric of Fiction Craft of Fiction. Author Steven Craft and Helen D. Cross Publisher/Year Oxford: OUP, 2000 Ian Watt Wayne C. Boot Percy Lubbock University of California Press, 2001 Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1983 Penguin, 2007 Cambridge University Press, 2008 New Delhi: OUP, 2007 6 Literature and Gillian Lazar Language Teaching: A Guide for Teachers & Trainers A Hand Book of Wilfred L. Guerin et al Critical approaches to Literature 5. CYBER RESOURCES www. Questia. com www. Bookrags. com www. Novelguide. com www. gradesaver. com/the-old-man-and-the-sea http://www. parknotes. com/lit/oldman/ http://www. studygs. net/fiction. htm 6. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) 38 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES READING DRAMA COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN5B1 READING DRAMA 5 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS 1. AIM OF THE COURSE • To develop in students a taste for reading drama with a theoretical basis, and to enter imaginatively into other worlds, to consider issues and to explore relationships from the points of view of different people • • • • • • 3. 2.

OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE To develop a critical understanding of drama and various kinds of theatre and a range of dramatic skills and techniques To familiarize students with the cultural diversity of the world To provide students with a meaningful context for acquiring new language and developing better communication skills To foster a strong sense of involvement which motivates and encourages students to learn through active participation To facilitate exploration of attitudes, values and behaviour and creation of roles and relationships so that the student gains an understanding of themselves and others through dramatic, imaginative experience To develop confidence and self-esteem in their relationships with others and sensitivity towards others COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I – DRAMA & THEATRE a. Drama as a performing art – Drama as a tool for social criticism – Theatre – Introduction to theatres such as Absurd, Epic, Street, Cruelty, Anger, Feminist, Ritualistic, and Poor. b. Genres: Tragedy, Comedy, Tragi-Comedy, Farce and Melodrama, Masque, One-ActPlay, Dramatic Monologue c. Setting – Plot – Character – Structure – Style – Theme – Audience – Dialogue 39 CORE READING TEXTS B. Prasad. A Background to the Study of English Literature, Rev. Ed.

Delhi: Macmillan, 2008. (Pages 106 – 182) Robert Scholes et al (ed). Elements of Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Essay, Film, ed IV. OUP, 2007. (Pages 773 – 800) MODULE II – READING DRAMA William Shakespeare Ibsen :Macbeth (1623) : Doll’s House (1881) Act III (A general awareness of the entire play is expected) J. M. Synge 4. READING LIST:FURTHER READING Sl. Title No 1 Elements of Drama 2 3 4 A Hand Book of Critical approaches to Literature The Semiotics of Theatre and Drama Literature, Criticism, and Style: A Practical Guide to Advanced Level English Literature Literature and Language Teaching: A Guide for Teachers & Trainers Author J. L. Styan Wilfred L.

Guerin et al Keir Elam Steven Craft and Helen D. Cross Publisher/Year Cambridge University Press, 1967 New Delhi: OUP, 2007 London: Routledge, 2009 Oxford: OUP, 2000 : Riders to the Sea (1904) 5 Gillian Lazar Cambridge University Press, 2008 6. CYBER RESOURCES http://virtual. clemson. edu/groups/dial/AP2000/drama. htm http://www. hmie. gov. uk/documents/publication/eltd-03. htm www. criticalreading. com/drama. htm – www. angelfire. com/ego/edp303/ www. associatedcontent. com/article/110042/anton_chekhovs_play_the_bear_ a_tragedy. html http://www. theatrehistory. com/irish/synge002. html http://www. theatredatabase. com/20th_century/john_millington_synge_002. ht ml http://www. answers. om/topic/all-god-s-chillun-got-wings http://www. eoneill. com/library/newsletter/iv_1-2/iv-1-2b. htm 40 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN5B2 LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS 5 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS 1. AIM OF THE COURSE The course studies what is language and what knowledge a language consist of. This is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. The course assumes no prior training in linguistics.

Students of Linguistics begin their studies by learning how to analyze languages, their sounds (phonetics and phonology), their ways of forming words (morphology), their sentence structures (syntax), and their systems of expressing meaning (semantics). 2. OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE • To lead to a greater understanding of the human mind, of human communicative action and relations through an objective study of language • To familiarize students with key concepts of Linguistics and develop awareness of latest trends in Language Study • To help students towards a better pronunciation and to improve the general standard of pronunciation in every day conversation and in reading. To help the students develop a sense of English grammar, idioms, syntax and usage. • To improve writing and speech skills. • 3. 4. LANGUAGE COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I – a) What is Language? – Speech and Writing – Language and Society b)Variations in language – Language Behaviour – Dialect – Idiolect – Register – Bilingualism MODULE II – LINGUISTICS 41 a) What is Linguistics? – Is Linguistics a Science? b) Branches of Linguistics : Phonology – Morphology – Syntax – Semantics – Semiology c) Approaches to the Study of Linguistics Synchronic Diachronic – Prescriptive – Descriptive Traditional – Modern d)Key Concepts in Linguistics Langue – Parole – Competence – Performance etc

MODULE III – PHONETICS Speech Mechanism – Organs of Speech Overview of English Sound System Classification of Vowels – Diphthongs – Triphthongs and Consonants Cardinal Vowels Phonemes – Allophones and Allophonic Variations Homonyms and Homophones c)Suprasegmentals : Stress and Rhythm – Intonation – Juncture d) Elision and Assimilation e) Syllable f) Transcription and Practice g) Application (to be done preferably in the Language Lab) The need for Uniformity and Intelligibility – Distinctions between Regional and RP Sounds – articulation and Auditory Exercises MODULE IV – STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH a) b) Introduction to Grammar Grammar of words Morphemes and allomorphs – Lexical/Content Words – Form Words – functional/Structural Words – Formal, Informal and Academic words – Idioms c) Word Class/Parts of Speech – Word formation – Derivation – Inflexion d) Grammar of Sentence Word Order – Phrase – Clause – Sentence Patterns e) Kinds of Sentences Declarative – Interrogative – Imperative – Exclamatory – Simple – complex – Compound f) Transformation of Sentences (Practical Exercises to be given in the prescribed areas) a) b) 4. READING LIST 42 A.

CORE READING Sl Title No 1 Language and Linguistic: An Introduction 2 An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English 3 English Grammar 4 5 6 7 Key Concepts in Language and Linguistics Elements of General Linguistics Practical English Usage Linguistics and English Grammar B. GENERAL READING Sl Title Author No 1 New Horizon in Language John Lyons (Ed. ) 2 English Pronunciation in Use Mark Hencock 3 4 5 6 A Practical English Grammar Thomson and Martinet An Introduction to Language Christopher. J. Hall and Linguistics Introducing Phonology David Odden Linguistics: A Very Short Introduction P. H. Matthews Publisher/Year Pelican Books, 1970 Cambridge University Press, 2003 Oxford University Press Viva Continuum Edition, 2008 Cambridge University Press, 2005 Oxford University Press Author John Lyon A. C Gimson Raymond Murphy R. L. Trask Andre Martinet Michael Swan H. A. Gleason

Publisher/Year Cambridge University Press, 1999 London, 1980 Cambridge University Press, 2005 Routledge, 2004 Midway Reprint Series Oxford University Press, 2005 Holt, Rinehart &. Winston, Inc. , 1965. 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER (To be incorporated) Sample Topics for Assignments Language and society – Branches of Linguistics – Bilingualism – The Need for the Study of Grammar – RP and Standard English – Approaches to the Study of Grammar – Linguistics as a Science 43 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT RESTRUCTURED CURRICULUM FOR BA PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY COURSE CODE TITLE OF THE COURSE SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TO BE TAUGHT EN5B3 LITERARY CRITICISM 5 4 90 (5 hrs/wk) AND THEORY NO. OF CREDITS NO. OF CONTACT HOURS 1. •

AIM OF THE COURSE To familiarise the students with the literary terms and introduce to them the various streams in literary criticism, to make them aware of the inter-disciplinary nature of contemporary criticism and to develop in students, skills for literary criticism. OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE To make the students aware that all readers are critics To familiarise them with the factors involved in criticism like interpretation, elucidation, judgement and appreciation. To introduce the students to basic texts in criticism, relating to various movements and schools of thought. To develop critical thinking by introducing various tools of criticism-analysis, comparison, theoretical approaches etc.

COURSE OUTLINE MODULE I – CLASSICAL AGE Aristotle: Concepts of tragedy, plot Plato: Concept of Art, criticism of poetry and drama Contemporary relevance of the ideas in the above to be discussed CORE READING 2. • • • • 3. Aristotle. “Poetics” classical appendix in English Critical Texts , OUP, Madras, 1962. Prasad, B. An Introduction to English Criticism. Macmillan, India, 1965. pp 1-28. MODULE II – INDIAN AESTHETICS Theory of Rasa, vyanjana and alankara. (The relationship between Module I & II to be discussed. For eg. The concept of Rasa and purgation, Alankara and figures of speech etc. CORE R

How to cite English: Literature and Common Courses, Essay examples

Choose cite format:
English: Literature and Common Courses. (2016, Nov 19). Retrieved November 15, 2019, from https://phdessay.com/english-literature-and-common-courses/.