Last Updated 28 Jan 2021

How You’re Creating Your Own Talent Shortage

Words 627 (2 pages)
Views 313
Table of contents

Talent is more difficult than ever to find. In fact, after surveying 42,300 employers in 43 countries in October, ManpowerGroup’s found that 46 percent of participating U.S. employers were having difficulty filling jobs -- an all-time high since 2007.

Related: 

That's bad news. But, what if part of the problem is the fault of employers themselves? What if they're unknowingly sabotaging their own efforts?

Order custom essay How You’re Creating Your Own Talent Shortage with free plagiarism report

GET ORIGINAL PAPER

Actually, there are many subtle ways recruiters are limit their talent pools. Here are four ways businesses can stop creating their own talent shortage:

1. Remove gendered keywords.

Organizations aren’t doing this on purpose, but many are turning away quality candidates because their job post words are gender specific. Gendered wording means terms associated with feminine or masculine stereotypes. And this error is important: A September ZipRecruiter found that job listings with gender-neutral wording receive 42 percent more responses.

Create welcoming job posts for your own organization by deleting gender-specific words. Qualified male applicants may walk away when seeing "feminine" words they associate with a nurturing style. Try replacing "support," "supportive" and "understanding" with "team-focused," "courteous" and "customer-oriented."

Similarly, qualified female applicants may walk away due to traditionally masculine words like "leader," aggressive" and "ambitious" because they feel their personalities don’t match these words. Instead, try "exceptional," "go-getting" and "motivated."

When reviewing job posts, consider which words describe the type of candidate the company is seeking by highlighting specific requirements the candidate will need in order to perform well in this position.

2. Stop judging social media.

Social media has the power to make or break a candidate. Jobvite’s July of 1,600 recruiting and human resources professionals found that an overwhelming 72 percent of recruiters participating viewed typos on social media as negative.

Related:

While it’s true that job-seekers should be cautious about what they put on social media, recruiters may be limiting themselves by being offended by social media spelling errors. Disqualifying a candidate due to a typo on Facebook or Twitter will limit the talent pool immensely -- even a highly qualified applicant might miss a comma when posting a not-so-serious photo of her beloved dog.

Instead, consider what each candidate has to offer. If there are any errors on the application, resume and cover letter, yet the person seems qualified and competent in every aspect except for social media grammar errors, it may be time to give him or her a second chance.

3. Don’t exclude candidates who have taken time off.

Every year, organizations are offering more and more employee benefits -- especially family-based perks. According to the May release of the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans and its  of 577 respondents, 37 percent of companies now cover paid maternal leave.

However, some recruiters look at a gap in employment on a resume and automatically eliminate the candidate.

Remaining knowledgeable and relevant in a position is possible -- even after time off. Some of these applicants may even be a top choice because time out of the office can be restorative. So, considering candidates' previous career successes creates a better picture of their qualifying factors.

If the job requires specific education or training, see if everything is up to date, thanks to a previous job. Candidates who have been off for a while but took educational courses on their own time also are definitely worth a close look.

4. Build a presence on many networks.

Repeatedly resorting to the same job board or social network as a home for your recruitment ad will limit the number of eyes that job posts receive. Scan through each job board and social network to decide which ones best fit the demographics the company is seeking.

Related: 

As more talent begins to funnel into the organization’s pipeline, consider using an enterprise social network, like , to keep track of this talent in a branded environment where candidates can pull in other qualified applicants easily through referrals. The more people who are placed in this talent funnel, the less time it takes to find qualified candidates.

This essay was written by a fellow student. You can use it as an example when writing your own essay or use it as a source, but you need cite it.

Get professional help and free up your time for more important courses

Starting from 3 hours delivery 450+ experts on 30 subjects
get essay help 124  experts online

Did you know that we have over 70,000 essays on 3,000 topics in our database?

Cite this page

Explore how the human body functions as one unit in harmony in order to life

How You’re Creating Your Own Talent Shortage. (2018, Aug 13). Retrieved from https://phdessay.com/how-youre-creating-your-own-talent-shortage/

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

Save time and let our verified experts help you.

Hire writer