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Educational Psychology and Learning

Essay Topic: ,
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Teacher

The role of the teacher is to examine and calibrate the progress of each pupil which they are responsible for. The teacher plans the lesson and schemes of work as well as directs the class. A Teacher carries out assessments and evaluations and follows the national curriculum.

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They are accountable and responsible for each and every pupil under their jurisdiction. It is their role to collect and summarise information to identify each pupil’s achievement. The teacher identifies the learning objective and reports to the class when it should be accomplished.

A teacher will comply with end of term/year reports and be able to communicate with staff, other professionals and parents regarding each student’s progress and ability. A dedicated teacher would be acquainted with a pupil’s interests and their learning styles. Be enthusiastic and committed and the ability to work with a diversity of needs. A teacher has to be flexible, highly motivated have excellent organisational skills and be a good motivator. Importantly a teacher should demonstrate being a good role model, maintain discipline and praise their pupils.

Learning Support Practitioner

The role of the teacher assistant is to promote a pupil’s learning and development by supporting the pupils, teacher, school and national curriculum. The key role is to support and guide the pupil to help achieve the learning objective. Their job is to help the pupils under the direction and guidance of the teacher. A teaching assistant should have a good knowledge of the subject of which they are supporting in order to deliver it effectively. They should be able to deliver feedback to the teacher on pupil’s progress and monitor it, as well as liaise with the teacher on the previous learning objective and reflect on it.

A teaching assistant have to observe and comply different formats of observations. Provide clerical support and monitor and maintain resources. A T.A. also has to be a good
role model, maintain discipline, be flexible and respect pupil’s social and cultural background. Good organisational skills and the ability to praise pupils are essential.

Ultimately the two roles desire the pupils to reach their full learning potential. Both should complement each other, work alongside each other as a team in order to achieve the best outcome for each student .JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-04

1.2SUMMARISE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT.

Summative Assessment or Assessment of Learning

Summative Assessment is conducted to identify the progress which pupils have made at the end of term, end of course or scheme of work. This is a summary of the overall learning of a pupil’s achievement which involves pupils undertaking standardised tests or external examinations. This form of summative learning is to judge the progress made at the end of a period of study. Summative Assessment is completed for:

SAT’S results
Class teacher assessments
Reviews of pupils with SEN
Pupils’ annual school reports
External examinations GSCE’s & AS & A Levels

Formative Assessment or Assessment for learning

Formative Assessment is the ongoing monitoring and assessment of pupil’s work with accompanying feedback to help them improve their performance. Formative assessment makes judgements about the pupils’ progress that is currently being carried out with an intention of informing teachers and pupils about how their work may be modified, improved or changed. This form of assessment for learning engages not only the teacher but the pupil and can be used to check the learning in any lesson.

Teacher using open ended questions that will encourage the pupil to think for themselves “How do you think that could have been done better?”

Listen to pupils’ explanations and description of methods on how they study.

A Teacher/Teaching Assistant asking questions to pupils to check their understanding.

Observing pupils is a most informative method of gaining knowledge on a pupil’s progress. There are different types of observation depending on the learners needs.

A learning objective should always be identified at the start of the learning activity, so a pupil will understand what they are learning and at the end have they achieved the learning objective. This method teaching will engage a pupil in reviewing their own progress. JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-05

1.3EXPLAIN THE CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING.

Assessment for learning is the key term of using assessment as part of teaching and learning in ways which will raise learners’ achievements.

Assessment for learning is highly effective in improving the quality of learning, which is why it has been introduced and proved to be successful. The definition of assessment for learning – it is the process of seeking evidence, interpreting for use by learners and teachers to decide where the learners are up to in their learning and where they need to go and how best to get there.

The key characteristic of assessment for learning is that it shares the learning objective and its aim with the pupil. In doing so it identifies to the learners exactly how they have to perform to achieve a higher grade, consequently recognise the standards they are aiming for. Questioning the learners about their work enables them to see more clearly what they need to do next.

This engages the learner and involves them in peer assessment and self assessment, so that they are ultimately able to reflect on and recognise their own achievements. This enables pupils to build up on their skills before moving on to the next step. This process involves providing meaningful feedback to the learner on their progress so they know specifically where they are going and how to get there. An important aspect of assessment for learning is that the teacher/teaching assistant continually motivates and promotes confidence with the learner. This whole process is ongoing throughout every learning objective, for both the teacher and the learner in reviewing and reflecting on assessment information.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-05

1.4EXPLAIN THE IMPORTANCE AND BENEFITS OF ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING.

Research proves that assessment for learning has a big impact on teaching as it improves the quality of learning for the learner.

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The learner is not detached from their learning but is actively involved. This empowers the learner to reflect on their progress and improve on their performance. The effect of the learner being more in control of their learning thus increases confidence self-esteem and motivation. The way one feels about them self can have a huge impact on their learning. Research has recognised that assessment for learning has a profound influence on engaging pupils and keeping them interested.

Pupils with do not feel part of the learning process may develop low self-esteem, become disengaged and lose interest. By self-assessment pupils understand where to improve their studies and how. Effective feedback is important so both able and less able pupils are fully monitored and supported in order for them to reach their full potential. It enables a pupil learning to be adjusted to their own particular needs. Assessment for learning is a device that makes possible for a pupil to understand the aim of what they are doing, what they need to do to reach that aim and where they are in relation to it.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-05
1.5EXPLAIN HOW ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING CAN CONTRIBUTE TO PLANNING FOR FUTURE LEARNING CARRIED OUT BY: A)THE TEACHER
B)THE LEARNERS
C)THE LEARNING SUPPORT PRACTITONER

Teacher

Assessment for learning greatly contributes to the future lesson planning of the teacher. It informs them of where the pupil is at with their learning and helps dictate the next step of the learning process. It takes place day to day in the classroom and keeps the teacher up to date with each pupil’s progress. This practices helps the teacher make decisions regarding planning of future learning as well as share targets with the learner. Effective assessment for learners allows teachers to pass on the responsibility of managing their own learning to the pupil.

Learners

This process informs learners to know and recognise the standards for which they should aim. It identifies where they are in relation to this aim and how to achieve it. It helps immensely with an individual’s learning and the increased self awareness of how to learn will develop their confidence and motivation. By self assessment and looking at assessment criteria, pupils are able to ask for support in areas of which they are struggling and distinguish when to ask for it.

Learning Support Practitioner

This process informs the actions of a learning support practitioner on what is the best step to take, as well as alter their actions. The whole process enables teachers and learners to review and reflect on personalised learning / thinking skills PLTS. This procedure will inform a learning practitioner on how to approach pupil questioning based on what they have discovered about how a pupil learns. Therefore, this increases confidence and promotes effect learning. They may have to alter the pace of the learning to suit every learner so all are given an opportunity to revisit parts of indecision.

Reflective Log:

At the Alt Valley Community College initially the students are set diagnostic skill tests which indicate their competencies and weaknesses consequently, identify exactly where they need more help and practice. This informs the Tutor and T.A. to plan for future learning with this student as well as helps the student recognise aims for their own personalised learning programme. For example please see page 7 & 8. JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-05 2.1

OBTAIN THE INFORMATION REQUIRED TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING.

The learning objectives for the activities
The personalised learning/ thinking skills PLTS goals for individual learners The success criteria of the learning activity
The assessment opportunities and strategies

At the beginning of each learning activity the teacher should identify the learning objective, stating exactly what the learners should know at the end of the lesson. A good method of identifying the aim several teachers write W.A.L.T. (what are we learning today) on the board, or W.I.L.F. (what I’m looking for.) This way the learners can keep relating to the aim throughout the learning activity, and keep on task. The teacher must notify the learners about how they are going to be assessed, and how it will take place, in addition to how it will be measured.

This procedure helps the learner to take more responsibility for their own learning, a proven effective technique. A pupil needs to think about their own personalised learning whilst working towards a learning objective. Personalised learning is the process of tailoring and matching teaching and learning around way different learners learn in order to meet individual needs, interest and aptitudes to enable every pupil to reach their most advantageous potential.

This helps to promote their own personal development through self-realisation, self-development and self-enhancement to become active, responsible, self-motivated learners. The Teacher/Teaching Assistant and learner always need to look at the success criteria of the learning activity. The standard and success criteria should be shared with the learner. For example:

What pupil is learning – to write in paragraphs
Success criteria – pupil able to write in paragraphs

Why they are learning it – learner is only able to achieve a grade D in English if they are unable to write in paragraphs, to achieve a higher grade they must learn to write in paragraphs. How assessment will take place – teacher and teaching assistant will check pupil’s work to ensure they are consistently writing in paragraphs. A proven method is providing examples to the pupil which helps to meet the success criteria. As learners are supported assessment opportunities and strategies have to be used to motivate pupils to think about their work and progress. This is the process of utilising the best approach and techniques for the ongoing assessment during the learning activity.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-07

2.2 USE CLEAR LANGUAGE AND EXAMPLES TO DISCUSS AND CLARIFY PERSONALISED LEARNING GOALS AND CRITERIA FOR ASSESSING PROGRESS WITH LEARNERS.

Usually secondary school pupils have personalised learning goals for each subject which are noted on their interim reports, which are updated as the term progresses. The personalised learning goals reflect the learning objective of activities and take account of the past achievements and current learning needs of individual learners. The subject teacher usually collates pupils with the same ability and personalised learning goal so they can work together and their needs tailored as a group.

Individual or personalised learning plans are in place for pupils with additional needs and their personal targets documented. This will have been agreed and signed with the pupil, parents/carers and teachers.

Reflective Log:

At the Alt Valley Training Centre I did an assessment of learning on a pupil’s diagnostic skills numeracy examination. I noticed the pupil completely failed the percentages part of the paper. This pupil was due to undertake an apprenticeship in joinery. I spoke to the pupil and brought these findings to his attention and emphasised the importance of percentages in joinery, and the success criteria in achieving it, in order to complete his apprenticeship. I downloaded resources regarding this topic and I am at present in the process of working with him for the ongoing assessment of the learning activity.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-07

2.3 USE ASSESSMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND STRATEGIES TO GAIN INFORMATION AND MAKE JUDGEMENTS ABOUT HOW WELL LEARNERS ARE PARTICIPATING IN ACTIVITIES AND THE PROGRESS THEY ARE MAKING. Ensure pupils understand the learning objective or any individual learning targets so they can assess their own progress as they proceed

Explain to pupils on how to reach the learning objective

Listen to pupils describe their work and their reasoning

Check pupils understanding through questioning and using open-ended questions

Observe pupils noticing the kinds of strategies they are using and what they are finding difficult

Engage pupils in reviewing their own progress throughout the learning activity

Inform pupils on how they will be assessed

If possible provide examples of work produced by other learners

Continually provide support and oral feedback as pupils are working as well as assessment and praise

Give opportunities for self or peer assessment

If possible allocate time for pupils to discuss work before handing it in

Provide written feedback
Reflective Log:

I worked with the students whom failed the percentage paper. I demonstrated the method of percentages and then asked him a few questions to check whether he understood. He then attempted some himself and was struggling.

I continued to sit and observe him and asked him why he was doing the sum via that method. I continued to encourage him and explain the necessity of this qualification. I repeated my strategy to him and we continued through the work booklet. On completion I praised him for his diligence and informed him I would mark it later. JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-07

2.4 PROVIDE CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK TO LEARNERS TO HELP THEM UNDERSTAND WHAT THEY HAVE DONE WELL AND WHAT THEY NEED TO DEVELOP.

For assessment for learning to be effective every learners needs constructive feedback. This developmental pointer is crucial if progress is to be made. It can affirm the pupils’ strengths and identifies the weaknesses. Pupils need feedback during and following each learning activity. The information should be given which centres on their performance and be conveyed positively. Pupils should be notified that the feedback is based on facts and should not be taken personally. There are different types of feedback:

Affirmative Feedback which if possible should be given during the learning activity to encourage and motivate Developmental feedback which gives suggestions on how to do better next time Both types of feedback can be given orally or written but really need to be given as soon as possible so the pupil can take it on board and action it.

This also applies to teachers marking, if feedback is given too long after an activity children forget and find it harder to apply. Research has found that marking within the child’s presence is more helpful to each individual. A technique teachers use for writing on a good learning exercise is “two stars and a wish” or for improvement guidance “E.B.I. (even better if)” and suggestions provided. Best practice checklist for providing feedback:

Remain non-judgemental
Focus on strengths
Work through one thing as a time
Give constructive feedback where needed and guidance on how a child can improve Link feedback directly to what has been observed or written
End the session positively

Reflective log:

Regarding the percentage students I sat with him to mark his paper, we worked through it step by step and I praised him on his competent working out calculations, as we were then able to identify at which point his method went wrong. I got him to look at some questions logically and in every day terms so he could then maybe estimate the answer and recognise the difference in his answers. On completion he felt confident about the activity; whereas at the beginning he told me he would never to be able to do it. I conveyed to him how pleased I was with his progress.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-16
2.5 PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES AMD ENCOURAGEMENT FOR LEARNERS TO IMPROVE UPON THEIR WORK.

Each pupil is an individual and this fact must be recognised and considered when doing assessment for learning. Their own personal standards of achievements must be measured against their previous record and not compared to other learners. The next stage of learning must be based on their previous understanding and so on. It is unachievable to continue with the learning plan when a pupil has not understood the previous stage. Learning needs to be built up in a step by step formula, whereas one stage of procedure supports the other to gain an overall concept of the task in hand.

Pupils should always be encouraged to discuss any difficulties they entail throughout the learning activity and previous learning experiences. This effective method helps to consolidate their knowledge and reinforce their understanding before moving on with the next topic. This helps motivate them and to promote confidence and self-esteem. These three factors have a huge impact on learners and every effort should be made to uphold and support them. Pupils with low self-esteem should be allocated more time and patience and learning objectives clarified regularly. On occasion support staff has to modify or adapt the learning objective in order for them to achieve it.

To encourage each pupil to take responsibility for their own learning it has to be discussed with them and the onus placed upon them in relation to: How they think they can improve on their previous practice

What do they think went wrong?
Did they rush the learning activity?

Opportunities provided so they can improve:
Do they want to redo the learning activity?
Do they wish to stay in at break time?
Would they prefer to take it home and do it as homework?
Or have they got any other suggestions.
JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-12

3.1 USE INFORMATION GAINED FROM MONITORING LEARNERS PARTICIPATION AND PROGRESS TO HELP LEARNERS TO REVIEW THEIR LEARNING STRATEGIES, ACHIEVEMENTS AND FUTURE LEARNING NEEDS.

Assessment for learning is ongoing throughout the learning activity. The review of pupils’ work if possible should be processed during the learning session. This is not always achievable during certain teaching presentations but if feasible time should be allocated for review. This enables students consider their work at each stage. This encourages the pupil to take responsibility for their own learning and for the teaching assistant to support and translate the teaching.

Techniques to help learners review their learning strategies: Using open-ended questions- Where are you up to in your learning? Where do you need to go? And how best to get there. This helps them measure their progress against previous learning activities. Class discussion/in groups/ with a partner/ by yourself. Helps them to think about how they acted the learning activity and think how they could do it differently in the future. Provide sheet with learning objective for learners to refer to and explain objectives Provide oral feedback

Use examples of work in class discussions to highlight the ways that work can be improved Provide positive and constructive feedback

Match learning objective to needs in order to provide challenges and set appropriate targets Praise success throughout the learning activity
Reflective Log:

As part of the Joinery Apprenticeship Diploma the students have to complete and pass a Construction Skills Certificate Scheme CSCS. In order to be allowed on site. They each individually complete this test online, which is out of 40 questions and the pass mark is 36. The summary identifies the right and wrong answers. I speak to the students during the activity and ask what the reasoning behind them choosing a particular answer was. At times they are placed in pairs so they can work together and accumulate each other knowledge to increase their mark. They are continually told of their last mark and their target each time is just to increase it by 1 mark. We celebrate success and the students gain satisfaction on their own progress and increase confidence that they “can do” it. JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-12

3.2 LISTEN CAREFULLY TO LEARNERS AND POSITIVELY ENCOURAGE THEM TO COMMUNICATE THEIR NEEDS AND IDEAS FOR FUTURE LEARNING.

All teaching staff has to listen to all learners in order to identify their own particular strengths and weaknesses in each learning objective. They have to be given the opportunity to converse so that they know and recognise the standard for which they should aim. Via feedback from the learner informs teachers on how to be pro-active to their needs. Consequently, learners discover what they should do next in order to improve. Their own particular learning style has to be considered, for example intrapersonal learners do not thrive doing collaborative group work. By communicating their own personal preferences and ideas helps individuals to own and drive their own attainment. Learners should be encouraged to adopt their own personalised learning approach, which involves taking a highly structured and responsive approach to each learner, in order that they everybody is able to progress achieve and participate.

This allows them to explore their own particular interests and reflect on their individual aspirations and learning habits. Research has shown that young people will produce better quality work when dealing with content they have an interest in. Positive encouragement can greatly enhance a learner; it promotes confidence and can give them the boost they needs when they are struggling with a particular task. A constructive comment can help achieve the objective and gain success criteria. This helps the learner to remain engaged and on task in addition to them gaining satisfaction regarding their own progress.

Schools have strategies to check on pupils’ learning: Traffic light system- Pupils like to fit in with the class and do not like to be seen asking for help or lack confidence in requesting it, a pupil has a picture at the top of the page and can colour 1 of 3 lights which indicates on how their coping with the learning activity, red=help, amber just about on task, green no problems, therefore teachers can identify if help is required. Foggy bits- pupils are given the opportunity to write down or articulate the parts of the session or activity that have not been clear, Write a sentence- pupils are able to put in a sentence the key points of the learning at the end of a unit of work or learning activity.

Talk partner review- pupils are given the opportunity to talk to their partner about what they found difficult and what they enjoyed in the learning activity. This can also be done at the beginning of a session to see what the already know. Post it notes/white boards- pupils can easily write down what they have learnt, found easy or hard. JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-15

3.3 SUPPORT LEARNERS IN USING PEER ASSESSMENT AND SELF-ASESSMENT TO EVALUATE THEIR LEARNING ACHIEVEMENTS.

When pupils are involved in assessing their own performance, they can often provide teachers and teaching assistants with insights into their own learning. Research has indicated that pupil involvement is likely to encourage pupils to become more focused upon the teacher’s intended learning outcomes, helps them to become more aware of personal areas in which they have strengths and weaknesses and in some instances assist in the management of behaviour.

Assessment information is only of value when it is used to improve teaching or learning. Pupils need to know how they are progressing and appreciate being involved in discussions about their own learning. Even on a informal basis teaching staff should find opportunities to engage pupils in discussions about how they feel they are getting on with their work. Supporting pupils with self-assessment techniques:

Clarify the purpose of the task – This is so pupils understand why they are doing it Keep assessment criteria simple – Be very clear on what pupils are being assessed against. If there are more than two criteria make them very specific. Encourage pupils to periodically check learning against the criteria – This will keep them focused on what they have to do. Ask pupils
to tell you what they think they are doing and why – This enables the teacher to check that children have understood the task and how their learning will be measured. An ideal technique for pupils to build up their assessment skills is through working with adults and their peers.

This method enables them to look more objectively at their own achievements. Collaboration in peer assessment allows each pupil to look at one another’s work and notice how it relates to the assessment criteria. They are then able to discuss what they have been asked to do and how their work reflects this, as well as bring to their attention to what teachers are looking for when measuring achievement. Peer assessment should not be used to compare pupils’ grades and achievements. That is why it is important to make it clear to pupils on what they will be assessed against. Peer assessment can also assist in peer learning whereas one pupil can obtain hints and tips from another.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-15

3.4 SUPPORT LEARNERS TO: A) REFLECT ON THEIR LEARNING B) IDENTIFY THE PROGRESS THEY HAVE MADE C) IDENTIFY THEIR EMERGING LEARNING NEEDS D) IDENTIFY THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THEIR LEARNING STRATEGIES AND PLAN HOW TO IMPROVE THEM. A) Reflect on their learning:

Pupils need to be encouraged to reflect on their learning during the process, and not just when it is completed. This is in order to reveal what is the best approach as well as if they are taking the best way towards achieving success criteria.

This helps them to understand their own personalised learning and develop thinking skills for improvement. Techniques are to question the pupil to check he understands the purpose of the task, ask what they are doing and why, notify them on what they are being assessed on and be very specific and encourage them to check periodically against the learning criteria, to ensure they are keeping focused. B) Identify the progress they have made:

Teachers need to check that pupils are able to assess their own progress that they have made when working. This can be done through self or peer assessment. Throughout the learning session teachers/teaching assistant
should maintain continuous dialogue about the progress they have made. This can be identified by asking questions for example, tell me what you have learnt during this session, and if a question is asked see if another pupil can answer it, or by asking pupils to write down what areas of the topic they found difficult. C) Identify their emerging needs:

As a pupil looks at their learning they will begin to know what they need to improve on. They should be told which level they have presently attainted and what they need to do to achieve the next level. For a pupil who is performing beneath their capability a discussion may provide formative points which indicate how they could improve. D) Identify the strengths and weaknesses of their learning strategies and plan how to improve on them: The strengths and weaknesses of pupils learning has to be brought to their attention.

Assessment materials/resources can be useful and re-assuring to identify to pupils their weaknesses. Or recognize their misconception and use it as a basis to work upon, as this can lead to a more positive to learning from their mistakes. Notify the pupil the area they need more practice on and encourage them to be resilient in their studies. For the pupil who is doing well, a discussion of an assessed piece of work may help them to improve even further by developing those strengths which have been identified to them. Another way of supporting learners is to allow them to keep a journal, in which they can keep a note of their learning and own personalised targets. Self-esteem should always be promoted.

4.1 PROVIDE FEEDBACK TO THE TEACHER ON: A) LEARNERS PARTICIPATION AND PROGRESS IN THE LEARNING ACTIVITIES B) LEARNERS ENGAGEMENT IN AND RESPONSE TO ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING C) LEARNERS PROGRESS IN TAKING RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN LEARNING.

A) Learners participation and progress in the learning activities: When doing assessment for learning techniques the teacher assistant must work closely with the teacher to plan how they are going to fit it into the learning activity. Discussion before the lesson will enable the best opportunities to be sort that then can be included into the activity. The teaching assistant must then provide feedback to the teacher on how the learner contributed to the lesson and how much improvement they have made.

This is in order to find the best strategies to use in the future. Different techniques need to be considered depending on the learner, as some students find some more thought provoking than others. B) Learners engagement in and response to assessment for learning: A Teaching Assistant must consider the different aspect s of assessment for learning when giving feedback to the teacher. The teaching assistant must attempt to connect the learners with their own learning and provide feedback to the teacher on how successful it was. This can be done by completing an observation sheet or orally. Another good method is jotting down comments from the learners during the activity.

The teacher may find it useful to know whether the pupil was more responsive and eager to participate if they were told that they doing assessment for learning. Alternatively feedback can be given through group feedback, in which the learners discuss the results of peer assessment with adults. In this way the teacher can find about their learning and feed back is given direct at the same time. C) Learners progress in taking responsibility for their own learning: Learners have to be encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning. Teaching assistant must notify the teacher on how the learner is managing to deal with it. During assessment for learning learners should be asked “where they are up to in their learning, where they are going and how to get there.” By this method pupils will come to understand that they are the drive behind the force as well as the teaching staff. Usually a successful learning activity identifies that the students have taken responsibility for their own learning. Attempts should be made to empower the learner, for example tell children when working out maths problems include your working out which also creates marks.

JAYNE WEBB 2012-05-16
4.2 USE THE OUTCOME OF ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING TO REFLECT ON AND IMPROVE OWN CONTRIBUTION TO SUPPORT LEARNING.

Following learning activities the teacher and teacher assistant need to discuss and reflect on its outcome. This identifies whether or not the learning activity has been successful. A Teaching Assistant must look at their own approach to the learning activity and judge whether their own approach could be improved when supporting pupils learning. It should be considered whether different strategies could have worked better with pupils. What can be done to challenge the pupils more and did I question them correctly. There is always room for improvement and reflection on activities gives the opportunity for it to be corrected. Regarding reflection one should think about:

How they questioned and encouraged the pupils to look closely at the assessment criteria. How they gave feedback to pupils.
How they supported both peer and self assessment.
Did they remain non judgemental.
Did they focus on strengths?
Work through one thing as a time.
Give constructive advice where needed and guidance on how a child could improve. Link feedback directly to what has been observed or written. Did the session end positively?

Reflective log:

I assisted a student working through a maths booklet. I found the students was not co-operating in the activity and was distracted with other happenings in the classroom. I continued with the activity, asking questions, explaining methods etc. Till completed. On reflection it appeared to me that I had done too much of the practicalities and not supported the learner. I should have abandoned the learning activity as it was not vital to the days learning and include the student with the rest of the classes learning activity. That approach would have worked better as the student would have been more engaged.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-16
3.2 LISTEN CAREFULLY TO LEARNERS AND POSITIVELY ENCOURAGE THEM TO COMMUNICATE THEIR NEEDS AND IDEAS FOR FUTURE LEARNING

Reflective Log:
Whilst checking the students’ diploma booklet I noticed two students were struggling with spelling, punctuation and grammar and the aims of each question. I spoke to them each separately and explained would they like me to help them as that was my purpose being here. They both divulged that they were finding the theory difficult. I worked with each student looking through their booklet and asked them to identify their problems in order for me to help them.

I discovered that the key words on each question, for example, compare, contrast, analyse, justify etc the students did not comprehend. Afterwards I diligently assessed the booklet making a note of key words and wrote a summary of them together with a dictionary definition, which I stapled to the work booklet. This I showed to the learners assuring them they would find it helpful. I reiterated to them any further problems would they please speak to me and confirmed I would observe them closely in the classroom.

3.3 SUPPORT LEARNERS IN USING PEER ASSESSMENT AND SELF-ASSESSMENT TO EVALUATE THEIR LEARNING ACHIEVEMENTS Reflective Log:

Regarding the above students I spoke to the tutor and identified their needs and suggested if he and the students agreed could I coach them with their English whenever possible. Presently, we sit together and work through communication and spelling books and I reveal little tips for example, necessary “remember a shirt has 1 collar and 2 sleeves” etc. The students do not cope well with self-assessment; they have not got a long concentration span and poor resilience.

But I do continually positively encourage it. I have found that peer assessment has worked well as there is a competitive spirit involved with both of the learners. They have commented on their surprise at their own progress. I confirm to them the importance of English not only to achieve their joinery diploma but an essential life skill.

JAYNE WEBB MAY 2012-05-26

3.4 SUPPORT LEARNERS TO A) REFLECT ON THEIR LEARNING B) IDENTIFY THE PROGRESS THEY HAVE MADE C) IDENTIFY THE LEARNERS EMERGING NEEDS D) IDENTIFY THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESS OF THEIR LEARNING STRATEGIES AND PLAN HOW TO IMPROVE THEM. Reflective Log:

I was assisting students in a functional skills maths class, the learning objective was to teach the students area, volume and perimeter. The students were not very motivated and I explained the importance of these
topics to achieve their hairdressing diploma as well as in everyday life. I observed each student and commented on their correct formula and suggested they look at parts again.

Peer assessment worked quite well in the session as they liaised with each other and gained tips to further their learning. At the end of the session we asked what they found difficult and identified topics to revisit. I liaised with the Tutor and we decided to redo the learning activity at a later date but decided the best approach was to visit each topic- area, formula and perimeter on a separate day as we felt that the students were overloaded with all the different formulas.

4.1 PROVIDE FEEDBACK TO THE TEACHER ON: A) LEARNERS PARTICIPATION AND PROGRESS IN THE LEARNING ACTIVITY B) LEARNERS ENGAGEMENT IN AND RESPONSE TO ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING C) LEARNERS PROGRESS IN TAKING RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR OWN LEARNING. Reflective Log:

I was asked by the Tutor to observe a student who was completing a ratio booklet and report to her verbally on her progress. This particular student is deemed as lazy and sluggish and has no work ethic. She was reluctant to participate and wanted too much help, in the hope that I would do it for her. As I was keyed up to her approach I engaged her as much as I dared, by explaining then asking questions to check if she understood. I made clear the importance of ratio in hairdressing and her aim to achieve it. She had to begin taking responsibility for her own learning.

Surprisingly, she was quite competent with the learning objective. I praised her success and reiterated she had to start working with the tutors and commented, “Where are you up to in your vocation at the moment? Not interested in maths, you know where you going- hairdressing, How are you going to get there- by working with the tutors and taking notice in the maths class. I spoke to the Tutor and she agreed that was the best approach and we would continue to use these tactics.

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