Between the Wars

The event that had significant impacts during the interlude between the First and Second World Wars would be the Great Depression. The effect of this financial crisis, not only in the United States but also in other parts of the world, was apparent both in the domestic front and in the international community. The Great Depression started during the late 1920s and would stretch until the next decade. This historical turning-point was triggered by Black Tuesday, which was the day when the stock markets had a major downturn.

(Rothbard, 2000) The impact of this event, both positive and negative, was massive indeed as the country was forced into a state of great recession and then reassessment of economic and social policies. (Mcelvain, 1993) In the ground level, the people experienced difficulties, as employment becomes scarce, thereby leading to poverty and hunger, which was prevalent during that decade. The citizens in the grassroots were the ones that was most affected, for the depression was deeply felt by everyone.

The length, lasting 10 years, was overwhelming indeed; the extent of the crisis was equally devastating. The agriculture and primary sectors industries experienced economic slumps even bankruptcies, which in turn burdened the people whose wages declined and employment opportunities disappeared. The end of this Great Depression coincided with the start of the Second World War. The implication of the financial crisis was not only social but also political, as policies were forced to be reassessed and eventually changed.

The New Deal policy was a result of the crisis. Also, government officials debated the liberal policies in economics, as many abandoned liberal economics, and advocated more protectionist policies. The impact of the Great Depression is far-reaching and vast, as it is political, social and economic. References Mcelvaine, Robert. (1993). The Great Depression: America 1929-1941. United States: Three Rivers Press. Rothbard, Murray. (2000). America’s Great Depression. United States: Ludwig Von Mises Institute.