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Tda 2.5 Schools as Organisations

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TDA 2. 5 Schools as organisations Task 1 Links to learning outcome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, assessment criteria 1. 1, 1.

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2, 2. 1, 2. 2, 2. 3, 3. 1, 3. 2, 3. 3, 4. 1, 4. 2, 5. 1, 5. 2, 6. 1, 6. 2 and 6. 3. •Identify the main types of state and independent schools •Describe the characteristics of the different types of schools in relation to educational stage(s) and school governance •Describe roles and responsibilities of: -School governors -Senior management team -Other statutory roles e. g. SENCO -Teachers •Describe the roles of external professionals who may work with a school e. g. ducational psychologist •Define the meaning of: -Aims -Values •Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their aims •Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their values •Identify the laws and codes of practice affecting work in schools •Describe why school have policies and procedures •Identify the policies and procedures school may have relating to: -Staff -Pupil welfare -Teaching and learning •Identify the roles and responsibilities of national and local government for education policy and practice •Describe the role of schools in national olicies relating to children, young people and families •Describe the roles of other organisations working with children and young people and how these may impact on the work in schools. Identify the main types of state and independent schools Links to learning outcome 1, assessment criteria 1. 1 AND Describe the characteristics of the different types of schools in relation to educational stage(s) and school governance Links to learning outcome 1, assessment criteria 1. 2 All children in England between the ages of 5 and 16 are entitled to a free place at a state school.

There are four main types of state schools that receive funding from the local authority. They all follow the national curriculum and are regularly inspected by OFSTED. Community schools – Run by the local authority, which employ the staff, own the lands and building, and decides which admissions criteria to use. Community schools have strong links with the local community and they usually offer their facilities for childcare and adult learning classes. (I do work placement at a community school) Foundation and trust schools – Foundation schools are run by their own governing body, which employs the staff and sets the admissions criteria.

Land and buildings are owned by the governing body or a charitable foundation. Trust schools are like foundation schools but they have an outside partnership which forms a charitable trust. The outside partner could be a business or educational charity. They try to explore new way of working to raise standards. The governing body decides whether to become a trust school with parents having a say. Voluntary-aided schools – Are mainly religious or faith schools. The governing body employs staff and sets the admissions criteria. The school buildings and land is owned by a charity hich could be a religious organisation. They also appoint some of the members of the governing body. Voluntary-controlled schools- Are similar to voluntary-aided schools, but are run by the local authority. The local authority employs the staff and set the admissions criteria. The land and buildings and land are owned by a charity usually a religious organisation, which also appoint some members of the governing body. There are; Specialist schools- which follow the National Curriculum and focus on a particular subject area like, sports, media or technology.

Academies- which are independently managed, they are set up by sponsors from business, faith or voluntary groups in partnership with the Department for Education (DfE) and the local authority. Together they fund the land and buildings, with the government covering the running costs. City Technology Colleges- These are independently managed, non-fee-paying schools in urban areas for pupils of all abilities aged 11 to 18. They are geared towards science, technology and the world of work, offering a range of vocational qualifications as well as GCSEs and A levels.

Community and foundation special schools- cater for children with specific special educational needs. These may include physical disabilities or learning difficulties. Faith schools- are mostly run in the same way as other state schools. However, their faith status may be reflected in their religious education curriculum, admissions criteria and staffing policies. Grammar schools- select all or most of their pupils based on academic ability. Maintained boarding schools- offer free tuition, but charge fees for board and lodging.

Independent schools- set their own curriculum and admissions policy is usually decided by the governing body and head teacher. They are funded by fees paid by parents and income from investments. Just over half have charitable status. They have to be registered with the DfE, and regularly monitored by OFSTED. http://www. direct. gov. uk/en/Parents/Schoolslearninganddevelopment/ChoosingASchool/DG_4016312 Describe roles and responsibilities of: -School governors -Senior management team -Other statutory roles e. g. SENCO -Teachers Links to learning outcome 2, assessment criteria 2. 1

School governors- work with the school, they work in partnership with the headteacher and staff. Governors do not intervene with the day to day running of the school, unless there is a serious problem. The governing body is also responsible for making sure that the schools finances are managed appropriately. It is also responsible for staffing and personnel management. They will also make decisions on issues involving the curriculum and whether to write new policies. Senior management team- Is responsible for taking interviews, inductions, performance monitoring, and appraisals.

They can also deal with complaints and issues with colleagues. Deal with courses and career development. They can hold staff meetings, also be responsible for child protection issues. Have general information about policies. Sort out salary queries. Other statutory roles e. g. SENCO- This person is responsible for coordinating the special needs policies in a setting and advising staff. They will be the line of contact for any outside agencies that need to come into the school to look at individual children with special needs.

Teachers- are responsible for the education and welfare of the children in the reception classes and for the communication with Parents and all members of the School community.

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Specific responsibilities: CURRICULUM • Provide a broad, balanced curriculum based on the Foundation Stage • Plan effectively, using learning objectives, producing long-term, mid term and weekly plans • Organise an appropriate timetable, following School’s guidelines • Arrange visits out of school for the children, to extend learning opportunities • Arrange visitors to come to school, to enrich learning and encourage enquiry

ASSESSMENT • Assess children regularly, both formally and informally • Observe individual children in different situations and involved in different activities • Use Baseline Assessment • Keep up to date profiles for all children • Use assessment results to plan appropriate learning programmes Describe the roles of external professionals who may work with a school e. g. educational psychologist Links to learning outcome 2, assessment criteria 2. 2 EDUCATIONAL PSYCOLOGIST Educational psychologists consider how children learn, so are used to helping to identify learning difficulties.

They visit schools and settings regularly and work alongside parents and professionals in the setting. PHYSIOTHERAPIST A physiotherapist helps to identify a child’s main physical problems while working alongside other professionals and parents. SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPIST Speech and language therapists work with children who have some difficulties with their language. COMMUNITY PAEDIATRICIAN Paediatricians are manly based in hospitals and clinics. They have specialised training in children’s medicine and children are referred to them via their family doctor for diagnosis. They make regular assessments of hildren’s progress and medical needs. They are able to refer children to other health services such as speech and language therapy and dieticians. COMMUNITY NURSE In some areas community nurses visit schools and settings to help provide advice and support. Integrating health and education is a major focus for the Every Child Matters programme, so some early year’s centres will have a community based at the centre. FAMILY DOCTOR (GP) A GP has general training in medicine. GP’s form part of the community health team and act as a base for a child’s ongoing medical treatment and notes.

CHILD PSYCHIATRIST Children or young people who are showing depression or emotional difficulties may be referred to child psychiatrist. A child psychiatrist has been trained as a doctor specialising in mental health and is able to prescribe medication as well as being able to consider the underlying issues behind a child’s emotional state. CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPIST A child psychotherapist will work with children or young people who are showing emotional distress by talking through their experiences with them and helping the child to explore these. CHILD PSYCHOLOGIST

A child psychologist looks at child’s development and learning in a similar way to an educational psychologist. The main difference between their roles is that a child psychologist may support children in a range of different settings rather than just in the educational context. PLAY THERAPIST A play therapist helps children to explore trauma or experiences through the medium of play. EDUCATIONAL WELFARE OFFICER/EDUCATION SOCIAL WORKER The main function of these professionals is to liaise between home and families in cases where school attendance is infrequent. It is an offence for children over 5 years old not to be in some sort of full-time educational programme. ) SPECIAL NEEDS SUPPPORT TEACHER These teachers travel between schools to visit young people or children in their home or pre-school settings. They are able to help a wide range of children and are often seen as useful sources of support and guidance. CLASSROOM ASSISTANT/LEARNING SUPPORT ASSISTANT Their main purpose is to support an individual child, young person or a group of children or young people within a classroom under direction of the teacher. Social worker

The majority of social workers are employed by the local authority, although some are employed by voluntary organisations. They are generally deployed in teams according to specialist areas, for example social workers may be involved in caring for older clients, adoption or fostering work. Social workers can provide guidance and advice as well as practical support for families. RESPITE CARERS Respite carers look after children for short periods of time so that their parents can have some time out. CARERS AND BENEFIT ADVISORS Some settings have career and benefits advisors as part of the team.

They can help parents find employment and training courses and give them advice about claiming benefit. Define the meaning of: -Aims -Values Links to learning outcome 2, assessment criteria 2. 3 Aims and Values are usually set out in the schools mission statement. Aims- explain what the school wants to achieve. They are usually set out by the head teacher with support from the community and parents. Values- can be determined by the schools rules, usually include respect for self and others and are closely related to Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) and citizenship education.

Values are based on moral code. The mission statement from the school I do my work placement at; All children will receive an education that is broad and balanced, that develops their potential and is suited to their needs. They will be given opportunities to discover and develop their talents through curricular and extracurricular activities. The ethos and curriculum of the school will instil values that will encourage independence, self esteem and respect for others. Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their aims Links to learning outcome 3, assessment criteria 3. 1

Schools may demonstrate and uphold their aims in a mission statement. For example the school where I do work placement explains that they are committed to encouraging the children to reach their full potential whatever their needs. Describe with examples how schools may demonstrate and uphold their values Links to learning outcome 3, assessment criteria 3. 2 Schools may demonstrate and uphold their values in a mission statement. The mission statement from the school where I do my work placement states that the curriculum and ethos of the school will encourage self esteem, independence and respect for others.

Identify the laws and codes of practice affecting work in schools Links to learning outcome 3, assessment criteria 3. 3 There are some laws and codes of practice that affect work in schools which are; Children’s Act 2004; Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and Special Educational Needs Code of Practice; Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. Children’s Act 2004 -it was passed to make sure that duties would be put on local authorities to ensure that all the different services that work with children and their families work more efficiently together.

Data Protection Act 1998 – Schools are required to keep information secure and it can only be used for the purpose it was gathered for. Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and Special Educational Needs Code of Practice- Schools are not to discriminate against disabled children this has led to more disabled children in mainstream schools. Health and Safety at Work Act 1974- Designed to protect everyone within the school and give procedures to follow in the event of an accident. Identify the policies and procedures school may have relating to: -Staff -Pupil welfare -Teaching and learning

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