Sociology 9.3

Social Inequality
exists in all class systems
Upper Class
prestigious universities (level of education)
Upper Class
owners of large businesses (occupation)
1%
What percent of the population does the Upper Class make up?
Upper Class
“Old Money” and “New Money”
Upper Class
family name is important
Upper Middle Class
college or university (level of education)
Upper Middle Class
business executives/ professionals (occupation)
14%
What percent of the population does the Upper Middle Class make up?
Upper Middle Class
based on income
Upper Middle Class
politically and socially active
Upper Middle Class
power and influence limited to communtiy level (not national level)
Lower Middle Class
high school / some college (level of education)
Lower Middle Class
lower level managers / supervisors (occupation)
30%
What percent of the population does the Lower Middle Class make up?
Lower Middle Class
hold white-collar jobs
Working Class
high school (level of education)
Working Class
factory workers, clerical workers, and salespeople (occupation)
30%
What percent of the population does the working class make up?
Working Class
manual labor, blue-collar jobs
Working Class
don’t have a large amount of savings
Working Poor
some high school (level of education)
Working Poor
laborers, service workers, and house cleaners (occupation)
22%
What percent of the population does the Working Poor make up?
Underclass
little high school (level of education)
Underclass
undesirable or lowpaying jobs, unemployed, welfare (occupation)
3%
What percent of the population does Underclass make up?
Underclass
families that have experienced unemployment and poverty over several generations
Underclass
main source of income is public assistance
3
How many techniques to rank individuals according to social class are there?
Reputational Method
individuals in the community are asked to rank other community members based on what they know of their characters and lifestyles
Reputational Method
suitable only in small communities
Reputational Method
these studies cannot be used to make conclusions about other communities
Subjective Method
individuals are asked to determine their own social rank
Subjective Method
most people place themselves in the middle class
Objective Method
sociologists define social class by income, occupation, and education
Objective Method
problem= each combination of factors produces a slightly different picture of social-class membership