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string(3027) " 72 Chapter 12 Tank/Fighting Vehicle Gunnery, page 76 Tank cannon firing conditions • 12–1, page 76 Surface danger zone • 12–2, page 76 Fighting vehicles • 12–3, page 84 Subcaliber tank gunnery devices • 12–4, page 89 Grenade launchers • 12–5, page 89 Weapons effect signature simulator • 12–6, page 93 Hazardous impulse noise exposure • 12–7, page 93 Firing vehicle status designations • 12–8, page 96 Close support of ground personnel in live-fire exercises • 12–9, page 97 Chapter 13 Aviation Gunnery, page 97 Firing operations, general requirements • 13–1, page 97 Firing conditions, general procedures • 13–2, page 97 Gunnery operations • 13–3, page 98 Surface danger zones • 13–4, page 98 HELLFIRE antitank guided missile \(semiactive laser\) • 13–5, page 102 Stinger guided missile • 13–6, page 108 Chapter 14 Air Defense Artillery Weapon Systems, page 108 General • 14–1, page 108 Firing conditions, general requirements • 14–2, page 108 Air defense artillery target missiles • 14–3, page 109 Redeye guided missile \(Army\) • 14–4, page 109 Stinger guided missile • 14–5, page 110 Chaparral guided missile • 14–6, page 113 Patriot guided missile • 14–7, page 114 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 iii Contents—Continued Improved Hawk guided missile \(Army\) • 14–8, page 116 Trajectory corridor • 14–9, page 120 Chapter 15 Antitank Guided Missiles, page 120 TOW missiles • 15–1, page 120 DRAGON and DRAGON generation II guided missiles • 15–2, page 132 JAVELIN Guided Missile • 15–3, page 137 Chapter 16 Chemical Agents and Smokes, page 140 Chemical agents • 16–1, page 140 Riot control agents • 16–2, page 140 Smoke • 16–3, page 141 Smoke pots • 16–4, page 141 Oil smoke candles • 16–5, page 142 Chloroacetophenone • 16–6, page 142 Chapter 17 Mines, Firing Devices, Trip Flares, Simulators, and Explosive Charges, page 142 General • 17–1, page 142 Firing devices • 17–2, page 145 Shaped charges • 17–3, page 147 Bangalore torpedoes • 17–4, page 147 Mine-clearing snakes • 17–5, page 148 Blast-driven earth rod • 17–6, page 148 Mine-clearing line charge • 17–7, page 148 Cratering charges • 17–8, page 151 Mines • 17–9, page 152 Firing devices • 17–10, page 155 Trip flares, M48, and M49 • 17–11, page 155 Simulators • 17–12, page 156 Training conducted in explosive entry techniques \(USMC\) • 17–13, page 156 Chapter 18 Laser Range Safety, page 157 Fundamentals • 18–1, page 157 Range usage • 18–2, page 158 Force on Force tactical exercises • 18–3, page 158 Chapter 19 Live-Fire Exercises, page 159 Safety during live-fire exercises • 19–1, page 159 Information for commanders • 19–2, page 159 Exercise planning • 19–3, page 159 Firing precautions • 19–4, page 160 Fire control • 19–5, page 161 Maneuver in temporary impact areas • 19–6, page 161 Air support • 19–7, page 162 Appendixes A\."

Department of the Army Pamphlet 385–63 Safety Range Safety Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 4 August 2009 UNCLASSIFIED SUMMARY of CHANGE DA PAM 385–63 Range Safety This administrative revision, dated 4 August 2009-o Clarifies procedures for application, processing, and approval for a Certificate of Risk Acceptance (para 3-9c(6)). Makes administrative changes (throughout). o Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 4 August 2009 *Department of the Army Pamphlet 385–63 Safety Range Safety raffic safety requirements, these provisions do not apply to development, proof and function test ranges, or laboratories.

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However, Army Commands, Army Service Component Commands, Direct Reporting Units, and Marine Corps installations having such ranges and laboratories are required to develop and apply alternate standards that are appropriate to the mission and that ensure the preservation of life and property. Proponent and exception authority. The proponent of this pamphlet is the Chief of Staff, Army.

The proponent has the authority to approve exceptions or waivers to this pamphlet that are consistent with controlling law and regulations. The proponent may delegate this approval authority, in writing, to a division chief within the proponent agency or its direct reporting unit or field operating agency, in the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. Activities may request a waiver to this pamphlet by providing justification that includes a full analysis of the expected benefits and must include formal review by the activity’s senior legal officer.

All waiver requests will be endorsed by the commander or senior leader of the requesting activity and forwarded through their higher headquarters to the policy proponent. Refer to AR 25-30 for specific guidance. Suggested improvements. Army users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to the Office of the Chief of Staff (DACS–SF), 200 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0200.

Marine Corps users will submit comments and suggestions for improvements to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Combat Development Command (C46R), 3300 Russell Road, Quantico, VA 22134–5001. Distribution. This publication is available to Army users in electronic media only and is intended for command levels A, B, C, D, and E for the Active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U. S. Army Reserve. Publication and distribution to authorized users for Marine Corps commands are indicated in the Table of Allowances for Publications.

History. This publication is an administrative revision. Summary. The Army and Marine Corps will use this pamphlet in conjunction with AR 385–63/MCO 3570. 1B, to establish and maintain a comprehensive range safety program. Applicability. The standards and procedures in this pamphlet apply to all personnel and range operations and activities on Army or Marine Corps controlled property or within Army or Marine Corps jurisdiction. The provisions of this pamphlet apply in peacetime and contingency operations and are advisory for actual combat operations.

Except for airspace and water Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number) Chapter 1 Introduction, page 1 Purpose • 1–1, page 1 References • 1–2, page 1 Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3, page 1 Applicability • 1–4, page 1 Deviations • 1–5, page 1 Installation and unit level Range Safety Program guidelines • 1–6, page 2 Guidelines for range safety certification programs • 1–7, page 7 *This regulation supersedes DA Pam 385–63, dated 10 April 2003. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 i UNCLASSIFIED

Contents—Continued Chapter 2 Ranges, page 8 Restricting access to impact areas • 2–1, page 8 Posting warning signs and markers • 2–2, page 8 Controlling other range usage • 2–3, page 9 Coordinating use of special use airspace • 2–4, page 9 Coordinating use of navigable waterways • 2–5, page 11 Safety requirements for indoor firing ranges • 2–6, page 11 Chapter 3 Ammunition, page 13 Smoking • 3–1, page 13 Positioning and issuing ammunition and explosives • 3–2, page 14 Qualification and restriction of ammunition and explosives • 3–3, page 14 Suspension of ammunition and explosives involved in malfunctions • 3–4, page 15 Unexploded ordnance and misfire procedures and reporting • 3–5, page 16 Disposition of ammunition and explosives involved in malfunctions and accidents • 3–6, page 16 Destruction of unexploded ordnance • 3–7, page 16 Policing the training complex • 3–8, page 17 Army requirements for areas known to contain ICMs and submunitions • 3–9, page 17 Chapter 4 Firing, page 20 Special firing instructions • 4–1, page 20 Warning signs and signals • 4–2, page 20 Firing conditions for ADA guided missiles and rockets • 4–3, page 20 Firing conditions for antitank guided missiles and rockets • 4–4, page 21 Safety requirements for firing aerial pyrotechnics (Marine Corps only) • 4–5, page 21 Chapter 5 Targets, page 21 General requirements for moving targets • 5–1, page 21 Airborne and ground targets • 5–2, page 21 Waterborne targets • 5–3, page 21 Radio controlled targets • 5–4, page 22 Aerial targets • 5–5, page 22 Ballistic aerial targets • 5–6, page 22 Chapter 6 Small Arms, page 24 Firing conditions • 6–1, page 24 Overhead fire • 6–2, page 24 Flanking fire • 6–3, page 25 Shotgun ranges • 6–4, page 25 Surface danger zone • 6–5, page 27 Blank ammunition • 6–6, page 27 Recreational ranges • 6–7, page 27 Chapter 7 Grenades and Grenade Launchers, page 27 Hand grenades • 7–1, page 27 Grenade launchers and grenade machineguns • 7–2, page 29 Chapter 8 Antitank Rockets, page 34 Firing conditions • 8–1, page 34 ii DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009

Contents—Continued Surface danger zone • 8–2, page 34 Chapter 9 Recoilless Weapons, page 42 Firing conditions • 9–1, page 42 Surface danger zone • 9–2, page 42 Chapter 10 Mortars, page 47 Firing conditions • 10–1, page 47 Surface danger zones • 10–2, page 47 Chapter 11 Field Artillery, page 49 Procedures and precautions • 11–1, page 49 Safety certification program • 11–2, page 49 Field artillery cannons • 11–3, page 49 Field artillery cannon SDZs • 11–4, page 50 Antipersonnel ammunition (beehive) • 11–5, page 56 Cannon launched guided projectile (Copperhead) • 11–6, page 58 Flight corridors • 11–7, page 62 Improved conventional munitions • 11–8, page 64 Field artillery trainer • 11–9, page 65 Multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) • 11–10, page 69 MLRS reduced range practice rocket • 11–11, page 72 Chapter 12 Tank/Fighting Vehicle Gunnery, page 76 Tank cannon firing conditions • 12–1, page 76 Surface danger zone • 12–2, page 76 Fighting vehicles • 12–3, page 84 Subcaliber tank gunnery devices • 12–4, page 89 Grenade launchers • 12–5, page 89 Weapons effect signature simulator • 12–6, page 93 Hazardous impulse noise exposure • 12–7, page 93 Firing vehicle status designations • 12–8, page 96 Close support of ground personnel in live-fire exercises • 12–9, page 97 Chapter 13 Aviation Gunnery, page 97 Firing operations, general requirements • 13–1, page 97 Firing conditions, general procedures • 13–2, page 97 Gunnery operations • 13–3, page 98 Surface danger zones • 13–4, page 98 HELLFIRE antitank guided missile (semiactive laser) • 13–5, page 102 Stinger guided missile • 13–6, page 108 Chapter 14 Air Defense Artillery Weapon Systems, page 108 General • 14–1, page 108 Firing conditions, general requirements • 14–2, page 108 Air defense artillery target missiles • 14–3, page 109 Redeye guided missile (Army) • 14–4, page 109 Stinger guided missile • 14–5, page 110 Chaparral guided missile • 14–6, page 113 Patriot guided missile • 14–7, page 114 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 iii

Contents—Continued Improved Hawk guided missile (Army) • 14–8, page 116 Trajectory corridor • 14–9, page 120 Chapter 15 Antitank Guided Missiles, page 120 TOW missiles • 15–1, page 120 DRAGON and DRAGON generation II guided missiles • 15–2, page 132 JAVELIN Guided Missile • 15–3, page 137 Chapter 16 Chemical Agents and Smokes, page 140 Chemical agents • 16–1, page 140 Riot control agents • 16–2, page 140 Smoke • 16–3, page 141 Smoke pots • 16–4, page 141 Oil smoke candles • 16–5, page 142 Chloroacetophenone • 16–6, page 142 Chapter 17 Mines, Firing Devices, Trip Flares, Simulators, and Explosive Charges, page 142 General • 17–1, page 142 Firing devices • 17–2, page 145 Shaped charges • 17–3, page 147 Bangalore torpedoes • 17–4, page 147 Mine-clearing snakes • 17–5, page 148 Blast-driven earth rod • 17–6, page 148 Mine-clearing line charge • 17–7, page 148 Cratering charges • 17–8, page 151 Mines • 17–9, page 152 Firing devices • 17–10, page 155 Trip flares, M48, and M49 • 17–11, page 155 Simulators • 17–12, page 156 Training conducted in explosive entry techniques (USMC) • 17–13, page 156 Chapter 18 Laser Range Safety, page 157 Fundamentals • 18–1, page 157 Range usage • 18–2, page 158 Force on Force tactical exercises • 18–3, page 158 Chapter 19 Live-Fire Exercises, page 159 Safety during live-fire exercises • 19–1, page 159 Information for commanders • 19–2, page 159 Exercise planning • 19–3, page 159 Firing precautions • 19–4, page 160 Fire control • 19–5, page 161 Maneuver in temporary impact areas • 19–6, page 161 Air support • 19–7, page 162 Appendixes A. B. C. References, page 163 Bat Wing Surface Danger Zones, page 169 Surface Danger Zone Design, page 177 iv DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 Contents—Continued Table List Table 1–1: OIC/RSO appointment requirements, page 4 Table 2–1: Breathing zone exposure limits for intermittent atmospheric lead exposures, page 12 Table 5–1: Ballistic aerial target system surface danger zone, page 22 Table 6–1: Minimum thickness of material for positive protection against caliber ammunition listed, page 24 Table 7–1: Surface danger zone dimensions for 40-mm machinegun, MK19, MOD3, page 2 Table 8–1: Antitank rocket launcher SDZ criteria, in meters, page 34 Table 8–2: Maximum ranges at various quadrant elevations (QE) for the 35-mm M73 practice rocket, page 35 Table 8–3: RAAWS/MAAWS SDZ criteria, in meters, page 37 Table 8–4: AT–4 surface danger zone criteria, in meters, page 40 Table 9–1: Recoilless rifles surface danger zone criteria (in meters), page 43 Table 9–2: Distances required for firing antipersonnel cartridges at quadrant elevations of 15° or less, page 43 Table 10–1: Mortar surface danger zone criteria, in meters, page 47 Table 10–2: Basic impact area dimensions, page 49 Table 11–1: Basic impact area dimensions, page 51 Table 11–2: Field artillery cannon SDZ criteria, in meters, page 55 Table 11–3: Heights of burst above occupied armor vehicles, in meters, page 56 Table 11–4: Beehive SDZ criteria, in meters, page 57 Table 11–5: Maximum range data sources for ICM munitions, page 64 Table 11–6: Secondary danger zones (A, B, and C) for ICM munitions, page 64 Table 11–7: Submissile drift factors for ICM munitions, page 65 Table 11–8: Field artillery trainer SDZ criteria, in meters, page 66 Table 11–9: Multiple Launch Rocket System SDZ criteria, in meters, page 69 Table 11–10: MLRS M28A1 reduced-range practice rocket SDZ criteria, in meters, page 75 Table 12–1: General tank cannon cartridge SDZ criteria, in meters, page 76 Table 12–2: Select tank cannon cartridge SDZ criteria, page 78 Table 12–3: DM 128 (M 901), TPCSDS–T, 105-mm cartridge SDZ criteria corresponding to target engagement distances, page 80 Table 12–4: SDZ criteria for firing M968, 35-mm TPGID cartridge corresponding to target ranges, in meters, page 83 Table 12–5: 25-mm SDZ criteria, in meters, page 84 Table 12–6: Subcaliber devices SDZ criteria, in meters, page 89 Table 12–7: Exposure limits to hazardous impulse noise from tank 105-mm main gun cartridges (per 24 hours), page 94 Table 12–8: Exposure limits to hazardous impulse noise from tank main gun for selected 120-mm cartridges (per 24 hours), page 94 Table 12–9: Hazardous impulse noise contours for various tank cannon cartridges, page 95 Table 13–1: Aerial rocketry surface danger zone criteria, in meters, page 98 Table 14–1: Improved Hawk corridor dimensions, page 119 Table 15–1: Basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2, AND TOW 2A missile range distances, page 123 Table 15–2: Basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2, AND TOW 2A missile danger areas, page 123 Table 15–3: TOW 2B missile distances, page 123 Table 15–4: TOW 2B Danger Areas, page 123 Table 15–5: DRAGON and DRAGON generation II missile SDZ criteria in meters), page 132 Table 17–1: Dimensions of sand cushion, page 143 Table 17–2: Safe distances for personnel (near bare charges), page 144 Table 17–3: Dimensions of sand cushion, page 145 Table 17–4: Minimum safe distances between RF transmitters and electric blasting operations, page 146 Table 17–5: Minimum safe distances between TV and FM broadcast transmitters and electric blasting operations, page 146 Table 17–6: Minimum safe distances between mobile RF transmitters and electric blasting operations, page 146 Table B–1: SDZs for direct-fire weapons without explosive projectiles, page 172 Table B–2: SDZs for direct-fire weapons with explosive projectiles, page 173 Table B–3: SDZ dimensions for Range Antiarmor Weapons System (RAAWS)/Multirole Antiarmor, page 173 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 v Contents—Continued Table B–4: SDZ criteria cal . 50, saboted light armor penetrator (SLAP) M903 (sand and steel media), page 175 Table B–5: SDZ criteria cal . 50, saboted light armor penetrator-tracer (SLAP–T) M962 (sand and steel media), page 176 Table B–6: SDZ Criteria cal . 0, MK211 (sand and steel media), page 176 Figure List Figure 5–1: SDZ for firing ballistic aerial target systems, page 23 Figure 6–1: SDZ for firing small arms, machineguns, and shotguns firing at a fixed ground target, page 26 Figure 7–1: SDZ for fragmentation and offensive hand grenades, page 29 Figure 7–2: SDZ for firing M79 and M203 grenade launchers, page 31 Figure 7–3: SDZ for 40-mm machinegun, MOD 3, page 33 Figure 8–1: SDZ for firing rocket launchers, page 36 Figure 8–2: SDZ for firing RAAWS, page 38 Figure 8–3: SDZ, area F for firing RAAWS, page 39 Figure 8–4: SDZ for firing AT–4, page 41 Figure 8–5: SDZ, area F for firing AT–4, page 42 Figure 9–1: SDZ for firing recoilless rifles firing at quadrant elevation of 15° or more, page 44 Figure 9–2: SDZ for firing recoilless rifles firing at quadrant elevation less than 15°, page 45 Figure 9–3: Surface danger zone for firing recoilless rifles firing antipersonnel cartridges at quadrant elevations of 15° or less, page 46 Figure 10–1: SDZ for firing mortars, page 48 Figure 11–1: SDZ for firing field artillery cannon in the indirect mode at fixed ground argets, page 52 Figure 11–2: SDZ for firing field artillery cannon in the indirect mode at moving ground targets, page 53 Figure 11–3: SDZ for firing field artillery cannon in the direct mode at fixed ground targets, page 54 Figure 11–4: SDZ for firing field artillery cannon with beehive ammunition in the direct mode at fixed or moving ground targets, page 58 Figure 11–5: SDZ for firing Copperhead in the ballistic mode, page 60 Figure 11–6: SDZ for firing Copperhead in the glide mode, page 61 Figure 11–7: Flight corridor for field artillery cannon fire over aircraft, page 62 Figure 11–8: An example of an established flight corridor, page 63 Figure 11–9: SDZ for firing field artillery trainer, page 68 Figure 11–10: SDZ for firing multiple launch rocket system, page 70 Figure 11–11: SDZ for firing multiple-launch rocket system M28A1 reduced-range practice rocket, page 71 Figure 11–12: MLRS reduced-range practice rocket area F, page 73 Figure 11–13: Formulas for determining risk of RRPR overhead fire, page 75 Figure 12–1: SDZ for firing general tank cannon cartridges, page 77 Figure 12–2: SDZ for firing select tank cannon cartridges, page 79 Figure 12–3: SDZ for firing 25-mm cannon cartridges, page 86 Figure 12–4: SDZ for Bradley fighting vehicle firing port weapon systems, page 87 Figure 12–5: 25-mm Sabot discard hazard area, page 88 Figure 12–6: SDZs for firing L8A1/A3 grenades, page 90 Figure 12–7: SDZs for firing grenades from M176, M226, and M239 grenade launchers, page 91 Figure 12–8: SDZs for firing M81 grenade, using standard 66-mm launchers on armored vehicles, page 92 Figure 12–9: SDZs for firing M82 grenades, using standard 66-mm launchers on armored vehicles, page 93 Figure 12–10: Hazardous impulse noise (140 dBP) contour zones, page 96 Figure 13–1: SDZ for firing aerial rocketry at ground targets, page 100 Figure 13–2: Rear blast area for hover firing and loading or unloading aerial rockets, page 101 Figure 13–3: SDZ for firing HELLFIRE laser-guided missile in direct launch at fixed target (lock-on after launch autonomous or lock-on before launch with remote designation), page 103 Figure 13–4: SDZ for firing HELLFIRE laser-guided missile in the indirect launch (lock-on after launch with remote designation) at fixed target, page 104 Figure 13–5: Designator zones for use with HELLFIRE laser-guided missile SDZ, page 105 Figure 13–6: Maximum designation angle for HELLFIRE missile laser designators, page 107 Figure 14–1: SDZ for firing Redeye guided missile at moving targets, page 110 vi DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009

Contents—Continued Figure 14–2: SDZ for firing Stinger guided missile at moving targets, page 111 Figure 14–3: SDZ, area F, for firing Stinger guided missile, page 112 Figure 14–4: SDZ, area F, for firing Chaparral guided missile at a point in space, page 114 Figure 14–5: SDZ for firing Patriot missile, page 115 Figure 14–6: SDZ for improved Hawk guided missile firing at a point in space, page 117 Figure 14–7: Typical trajectory corridor, page 118 Figure 15–1: SDZ for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles with a 1:1,000,000 probability of escapement, page 122 Figure 15–2: SDZ, area F, for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles, page 124 Figure 15–3: SDZ for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles with a 1:100,000 probability of escapement, page 125 Figure 15–4: SDZ for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles with a 1:10,000 probability of escapement, page 126 Figure 15–5: SDZ for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles with a 1:1,000 probability of escapement (requires an approved request for deviation), page 127 Figure 15–6: SDZ adjustments for firing basic TOW, improved TOW, TOW 2A, and TOW 2B missiles in a ground or aerial launch mode, page 129 Figure 15–7: SDZ, area F, for ATWESS for TOW and DRAGON missiles, page 131 Figure 15–8: SDZ for firing DRAGON and DRAGON generation II missiles, page 133 Figure 15–9: SDZ, area F, for firing DRAGON and DRAGON generation II missiles, page 134 Figure 15–10: SDZ for Javelin missile, page 136 Figure 15–11: SDZ, area F, for Javelin missile, page 138 Figure 15–12: Primary danger zone, area F, extension for activation of Javelin missile flight motor pressure relief system, page 139 Figure 17–1: SDZ for firing mine-clearing line charge with the M58 HE charge, page 149 Figure 17–2: SDZ, area F, and fragmentation zone for firing mine-clearing line charge with M58 HE charge, page 150 Figure 17–3: SDZ for firing mine-clearing line charge with the M68 inert charge, page 151 Figure 17–4: SDZ for firing Claymore mines, page 153 Figure 17–5: Air-volcano SDZ, page 154 Figure 17–6: Volcano dispenser SDZ ground, page 155 Figure B–1: SDZ for direct-fire weapons without explosive projectiles, page 170 Figure B–2: SDZ dimensions for direct-fire weapons with explosive projectiles, page 171 Figure B–3: SDZ dimensions for . 50 cal SLAP M903, SLAP–T M962, and MK211API ammunition, page 174 Figure B–4: SDZ dimensions for . 0 cal SLAP M903 and SLAP–T M962 ammunition Sabot discard hazard area, page 175 Figure C–1: SDZ dimensions for direct-fire weapons with explosive projectiles, page 178 Figure C–2: Indirect fire SDZ, page 179 Figure C–3: Ballistic footprint and associated SDZ, page 180 Figure C–4: Gun target line, page 181 Figure C–5: Dispersion area angles, page 182 Figure C–6: Dispersion area, page 183 Figure C–7: Tic marks for distance Y, page 183 Figure C–8: Addition of angles P and Q, page 184 Figure C–9: Completion of area W, page 185 Figure C–10: Addition of areas A and B, page 185 Figure C–11: Single firing position, target array, page 186 Figure C–12: Completion of SDZ, page 187 Figure C–13: Multiple firing positions, page 188 Figure C–14: CALFEX, page 189 Glossary DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 vii Chapter 1 Introduction –1. Purpose This pamphlet provides implementation guidance for the Army and Marine Corps (MC) Range Safety Programs prescribed in Army Regulation (AR) 385–63 and Marine Corps Order (MCO) 3570. 1B. It provides standards and procedures for the safe firing of ammunition, demolitions, lasers, guided missiles, and rockets for training, target practice, and, to the extent practicable, combat. 1–2. References Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A. 1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms Abbreviations and special terms used in this pamphlet are explained in the glossary. 1–4. Applicability a.

This pamphlet applies to— (1) The Active Army, United States Military Academy, the Army National Guard of the United States, U. S. Army Reserve, Department of the Army civilian employees, and contractors. (2) Army Reserve Officers Training Corps during range or firing activities located on or within the jurisdiction of a military installation. (3) Marine Corps commands active and reserve, unless the standards or procedures conflict with Department of the Navy or Headquarters, Marine Corps (HQMC) orders. Local standing operating procedures (SOP) and range policies will reinforce this pamphlet and AR 385–63/MCO 3570. 1B. (4) Range training and target practice activities. 5) Military real estate areas that are being or have been used as bombing ranges, artillery impact areas, target areas, and other areas exposed to contamination by military munitions, chemicals, pyrotechnics, or other dangerous materials. (6) All areas designated for live-fire weapons firing and laser training, including recreational ranges, located on Army- or Marine Corps-controlled property. (7) Civilian training complexes when authorized for Army or Marine Corps active and reserve use. b. The standards and procedures of this pamphlet are advisory for actual combat conditions. c. This pamphlet also applies to training outside U. S. territories. U. S. Army or Marine Corps installation commanders will apply the provisions of this pamphlet or host nation agreements as appropriate. d. Surface danger zones (SDZs) in this pamphlet represent minimum safety requirements.

They are adequate only when employed with properly functioning safety equipment and devices and when trained and competent personnel follow published firing procedures. e. Except for airspace and water traffic safety requirements, the standards and procedures in this pamphlet do not apply to development, proof and function test ranges, and laboratories; except when operation training is conducted on these ranges. 1–5. Deviations a. Deviations may be granted based on critical mission requirements that conflict with regulatory standards in accordance with AR 385–63/MCO 3570. 1B. Deviations are limited to— (1) Reducing SDZ dimensions when terrain, artificial barriers, or other compensating factors make smaller SDZs safe. 2) Modifying prescribed firing procedures appropriate for a state of training of participating personnel to increase training realism. (3) Allowing personnel who are not directly participating in the actual conduct of training within the SDZ. b. Deviations applied to SDZs extending beyond installation boundaries must be based on the ability to contain projectiles, hazardous fragments, laser beams and both vertical and horizontal ricochet sufficiently within the installation boundaries, and areas under military control (for example, leased land or training areas and facilities acquired through Memorandum of Understanding or Memorandum of Agreement. Probability of hazardous fragment escapement must not present a greater hazard than 1:1,000,000 (10? 6)(unlikely) to the public. c. As a minimum, all deviation authorizations will contain the following, as appropriate: (1) Statement citing chapter, paragraph, and subparagraph of the specific condition requiring deviation, and the name and number of the firing range, training facility, or maneuver area involved. (2) Description of the existing condition and anticipated hazards, subsequent hazard analysis, and risk analysis. (3) Statement as to why a deviation is necessary and impact on training if not granted. (4) Control measures taken to eliminate hazards and/or minimize risk and residual risk level. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 1 5) Installation and unit SOPs governing the specific firing range, training facility, or maneuver area for which the deviation applies. (6) Scaled topographical map depicting standard SDZ and requested deviation. (7) Map coordinates of the firing position, target location, and quadrant or elevation of fire, if required. The firing position, direction of fire, and SDZs will be plotted on the scaled map with distances shown in meters. (8) Terrain profiles through the gun target line (GTL) and left and right limits of fire showing the relative elevation of the weapon system to be fired, the target, and natural terrain backstop or artificial barrier. A cross-sectional terrain profile showing the natural terrain backstop downrange will also be submitted.

Terrain profiles only need to be drawn for the condition(s) requiring deviation and if profiles truly support justification for the deviation. Automated SDZ (ASDZ) trajectory profiles may be submitted in lieu of developing terrain profiles through manual means, if deemed appropriate by the installation commander. Risk-management principles will be applied in determining the applicability of alternate profiles. d. Requests for deviation will originate from the unit or activity conducting the event, or the installation range control officer (RCO). Requests will be coordinated through the appropriate chain of command as needed and the installation safety office, which will provide final review to ensure risk-management steps are accomplished. The installation range ontrol officer makes the initial judgment regarding the suitability of a proposed deviation prior to submission to the approving authority. e. Deviations are valid for 1 year. f. Deviations will not be applied to other Federal agency directives such as airspace or water traffic requirements. g. The and Marine Forces may communicate directly with the Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) command safety office for technical information and guidance on risk management. 1–6. Installation and unit level Range Safety Program guidelines a. The installation commander— (1) Ensures the installation public affairs office (PAO) is included in planning and executing the installation Range Safety Program.

The PAO assists in the education of on-post and off-post personnel to include school children (kindergarten through 12th grade) in the dangers of trespassing on ranges and training areas and handling unexploded ordnance (UXO). (2) Develops procedures to ensure all release of information to the public news media is made through the installation PAO and in accordance with AR 360–1. (3) Ensures warnings are issued at least 24 hours in advance, through the installation PAO, to the public news media before firing operations that may involve possible hazards to the general public. (4) Prohibits use of alcohol and controlled substances in the training complex and prohibit any individual under the influence of alcohol or controlled substance entrance into the training complex. 5) Ensures ammunition and explosives not expended during training are returned to the ammunition supply point (ASP), in the original packaging, when firing is completed or as directed by local policy. (6) Complies with Military Handbook (MIL–HDBK) 828A, or Space and Naval Warfare Instruction 5100. 12 and Marine Corps Order (MCO) 5104. 1, and this pamphlet in establishing firing ranges, training facilities, and maneuver areas for laser use within the installation training complex. (7) Appoints a senior range safety officer for air defense artillery (ADA) guided missile and large rocket firing exercises. (8) Ensures an aggressive education program on the dangers of dud ammunition and other items of UXO is implemented. b.

The installation safety manager (Army)/installation range control officer (RCO)(Marine Corps)— (1) Provides oversight responsibility for all range safety matters (Army) and is responsible for all range safety matters (Marine Corps). (2) Evaluates the overall effectiveness of the Installation Range Safety Program annually to ensure the Range Safety Program is being implemented in accordance with AR 385–63/MCO 3570. 1B and installation range regulations and procedures. (3) Inspects the installation training complex semiannually and high-risk training operations quarterly to support safety in training missions. (4) Reviews proposed local range safety policies and procedures. (5) Reviews and comments on all high-risk and/or extremely high-risk assessments for training and operations on installation owned facilities and units. 6) Assists the installation range control officer, PAO, and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) officer as required in developing and implementing an on- and off-post range safety and dud awareness educational program targeted to children (kindergarten through 12th grade). (7) Investigates or ensures range accidents are investigated by the appropriate command level and maintain records 2 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 of accidents occurring within or originating from the installation training complex in accordance with AR 385–40 or MCO P5102. 1, as appropriate. (8) Reviews all range modification and construction proposals, designs, and plans. (9) Participates in final range acceptance inspections following construction, renovation, or modification of facilities prior to any firing on the range (Army). 10) Reviews all nonstandard range and training activities, to include the user-provided, risk- management documentation for those activities with high or extremely high residual risk. (11) Reviews and make recommendations regarding the conduct of overhead fires. (12) Monitors officer in charge (OIC) and range safety officer (RSO) training program effectiveness. c. The installation RCO— (1) Serves as the central point for control and coordination for all activities conducted within the installation training complex to ensure safety and unified operations. (2) Coordinates safety issues with appropriate installation staff including the installation safety manager (Army). Coordinates range safety issues with appropriate installation staffs (Marine Corps). 3) If authorized by the installation commander, withdraws or suspends installation training complex privileges from any person, organization, agency, or club that willfully violates this pamphlet or local range regulations and procedures; or from any person whose ability or conduct is incompatible with the safe use of Government range structures and facilities. (4) Maintains and updates files of current and historical usage data on the installation training complex to include known hazards, type of ammunition expended on each range, dud accumulation and disposal records, and clearance status of temporary, dedicated and high hazard impact areas where available. 5) Maintains original records of current and historical surface danger and airspace zone diagrams, weapon system safety data, firing limitations, and survey data for firing points and impact areas within the installation training complex boundaries. (6) Approves, controls, and monitors personnel access into the installation training complex for both training and administrative activities. The RCO will be included in all range scheduling activities. If empowered by the installation commander, the RCO is the final authority regarding the use of training facilities and will be directly involved in all live-fire activities. (7) For the Army only, before personnel access is granted to range impact areas, determines whether actual or suspected improved conventional munitions (ICMs)/submunitions contamination exists.

The RCO, in coordination with installation safety and EOD representatives, determines if it is safe to permit personnel access and establish prerequisite precautions. Personnel permitted to enter any area known or suspected to contain ICMs or submunitions will be fully apprised of the potential dangers and the safeguards to be exercised. Additional actions required for ranges or other areas known to be contaminated by ICMs or submunitions are specified in chapter 3 of this pamphlet. (8) Maintains current maps and overlays of training complex impact area boundaries, SDZ diagrams, and ground hazards for dissemination of information to installation training complex users. 9) Establishes, maintains, and documents safety certification procedures for unit range OICs and RSOs. For artillery units, the commander provides the installation RCO a list of personnel who have successfully completed the unit certification program. The installation RCO ensures that all OICs and RSOs have received baseline education addressing the use of installation training complex facilities (for example, installation procedures for opening and closing facilities, communications requirements, MEDEVAC procedures, and so forth). (10) Performs administrative and investigative duties related to the safe operation of ranges, training areas, and airspace. 11) Assists the installation safety office and PAO in establishing and implementing an on- and off-post range safety and dud awareness educational program. (12) Exercises oversight of unit range OIC and RSO training programs, and serve as the authority on suspension or termination of OIC/RSO certification (Army). Installation RCO will conduct all OIC/RSO certifications (Marine Corps). (13) Exercises approval authority for the conduct of overhead fires when authorized by the installation commander. Approval is based on considering unit risk management documentation, maneuver plans, and the installation safety manager’s recommendation. (14) Coordinates as required with installation facilities engineers for maintenance of ranges and training facilities to provide safe operating conditions. 15) If required, participates as a member of the installation range accident investigation team, providing weapons information and scenario input to the installation safety manager. (16) Coordinates with local EOD, environmental, installation safety, and other involved staff organizations for clearance of unexploded ordnance as needed (Army). Coordinates with concerned staff for the clearance of unexploded ordnance as needed (Marine Corps). Marine Corps EOD does not have the mission for range clearance operations. (17) Monitors effectiveness of training programs for OICs and RSOs. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 3 (18) Develops and publish an installation/community range regulation. 19) Ensures that appropriate explosives safety site plans are submitted for permanent ammunition and explosive storage and distribution facilities (except for 1. 4 small caliber ammunition) on ranges. Note that there is no requirement for a site plan unless the storage/distribution facility is improved, such as building, covered concrete pad, and is used on a recurring basis. d. The quality assurance specialist, ammunition surveillance (QASAS)— (1) Ensures only ammunition certified and cleared in accordance with Technical Bulletin (TB) 9–1300–385 or NAVSEA TWO 24–AA–ORD–010 is issued for overhead fire of unprotected personnel. (2) Ensures ammunition is stored, handled, and transported in accordance with applicable regulations, standards, and policies. 3) Investigates and forwards malfunction reports in accordance with AR 75–1 and AR 385–40 or MCO P8025. 1D, as appropriate. Acts as installation’s coordinator for ammunition malfunctions, explosive accidents, and ammunition investigations. (4) Provides using units with technical assistance concerning all aspects of ammunition and explosives. (5) Provides ammunition liaison with range control office, installation safety office, logistics assistance office, EOD personnel, and training units. e. Battalion/squadron commanders— (1) Comply with the installation procedures for the certification of OIC/RSO/laser range safety officers (LRSOs) (Army). 2) For commanders of field artillery battalions and larger field artillery units, establish and maintain an artillery safety training and certification program to train and qualify personnel in safety procedures for their specific areas of responsibility. Personnel who have not completed annual training and certification will not be appointed as OIC or RSO. (3) Conduct risk management for all range operations. f. The unit commander— (1) Ensures compliance with this pamphlet, applicable technical manuals (TMs), field manuals (FMs), and Fleet Marine Force Manuals (FMFMs) (Marine Corps), installation range guidance, and applicable SOPs for safe training and firing for each weapon system within the command. (2) Ensures all personnel within the command are briefed on and comply with installation range procedures and safety requirements including required personal protective equipment. 3) Designates an OIC and RSO for each firing exercise and or maneuver in accordance with table 1–1. (Except as designated in paragraph 1–6h(1)(a), the RSO may have no additional duties during the firing exercise. ) Table 1–1 OIC/RSO appointment requirements Weapon system OIC1 OFF WO NCO RSO1 OFF WO NCO Practice hand grenades; subcaliber training devices; laser devices; firing devices; simulators & trip flares; small arms and machineguns Chemical agents and smokes2,6 Aerial gunnery & air defense weapons; flamethrowers; live grenades, grenade launchers, and grenade machineguns; live mines & demolitions; tank & fighting vehicle cannons; recoilless rifles. Field artillery3 Mortars ADA rockets and guided missiles.

Direct fire antitank rockets and missiles Live-fire exercises using organic weapons, squad through company, battery, troop. X X X X X X E6 E6 E7 X X X X X X E5 E5 E6 X X X X X E7 E6 X X X X X4 E6 E67 X X X X E7 E7 X X X X E6 E6 4 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 Table 1–1 OIC/RSO appointment requirements—Continued Weapon system OIC1 OFF WO NCO RSO1 OFF WO NCO Combined arms live-fire exercises using outside fire support, troop, battery, squad, platoon, company; or battalion and larger. 5 X X E7 X X E6 Notes: 1 Civilians in the grade of GS–07 or above may act as OIC, and GS–05 or above or equivalent as RSO. Civilian contractors may act as OIC/RSO when approved by the installation commander and in accordance with Contract SOW. OIC and RSO must be nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) qualified when conducting NBC or smoke training. 3 Use of E7s as OICs is authorized only when approved by the installation commander. Duties of the RSO are normally performed by either the battery executive officer or platoon leader. 4 SRSO will be a field grade officer, CW4 or CW5 (Army), or civilian in the grade of GS–12 or above. 5 OIC will be a field grade officer for battalion or larger CALFEX. 6 RSO for Marine Corps will be E6 or above for practice hand grenades, Chemical Agents and Smokes. The installation commander may allow E5 to act as RSO for practice hand grenades, Chemical Agents and Smokes. 7 RSO for Marine Corps can be E5 for mortar training activities. 4) Ensures personnel performing duties of OIC and RSO are certified in accordance with established installation safety certification program. (5) Complies with range safety certification program guidance in paragraph 1–7 for OICs and RSOs to ensure they are— (a) Competent and properly instructed in the performance of their duties. (b) Knowledgeable in the weapon systems for which they are held responsible and in safe ammunition handling and use procedures. (6) Develops SOPs for laser operations to include provision for immediate medical attention for personnel who incur eye or other overexposure to laser energy and reporting laser overexposure incidents in accordance with AR 385–40, TB MED 524, MIL–HDBK 828A, and MCO 5104. 1. 7) Applies risk management and develop controls and procedures for all phases of training events. g. The OIC. (1) Qualifications. (a) Commissioned, warrant, or noncommissioned officer (NCO, U. S. Army), staff noncommissioned officer (SNCO, Marine Corps) or civilian (U. S. Army). NCOs serving as OIC will be in the grade as shown in table 1–1 at a minimum. (b) OICs will be certified in the weapon systems for which they are responsible. For weapon systems equipped or dependent on lasers, the OIC will be knowledgeable of laser hazards and proper employment. The OIC holds responsibility and accountability for the conduct of the activity and the adherence to governing regulations and guidance.

He/she must be able to fully influence the conduct of the event. For aviation weapons systems the OIC must be weapons systems knowledgeable. (c) The OIC must have satisfactorily completed a range safety certification program. Marine Corps battalion/ squadron commanders are responsible for establishing and maintaining a certification program for their OICs and RSOs commensurate to the assigned duties and responsibilities. (2) Duties. (a) Ensures the overall safe conduct of training and proper use of the installation training complex. (b) Receives a range safety briefing from installation range control organization on use of the training complex. c) Ensures the RSO is physically present at the training site. (d) Determines when it is safe to fire in accordance with applicable regulations and installation range requirements. (e) Ensures receipt of final clearance to fire from range control. (f) Ensures proper supervision of personnel performing misfire, hang-fire, and cook-off procedures. (g) Ensures required communications are established and maintained. (h) Ensures safe laser operations. (i) Ensures adequate medical support is available. (j) Ensures ammunition and explosives are properly handled, transported, stored, and accounted for within the training complex from the time of receipt to the time of expenditure or turn in. k) Ensures a written log is maintained of pertinent safety and control data concerning the operation of firing ranges, weapons training facilities, and maneuver areas, authorized operating times, impact areas entries and exits, and cease fire authorizations. (l) Ensures plans for firing exercises and maneuvers are coordinated with range control. (m) Ensures control of target areas to prohibit entry by unauthorized personnel. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 5 (n) Ensures all ammunition malfunctions and accidents are reported to range control in accordance with AR 75–1 and AR 385–40 (Army), or MCO P5102. 1 and MCO 8025. 1 (Marine Corps). (o) Ensures coordination and approval has been gained from the range control agency for all civilian personnel that will be entering the training site. (p) Briefs the RSO on the duties to be performed in support of the training event.

Clearly establish the requirement for the RSO to brief the OIC on the safety of the facility and unit, and the readiness to commence live-fire operations prior to the start of firing. (q) Implements risk management in all phases of the training events. h. The RSO. (1) Qualifications. (a) Commissioned officer, warrant officer, NCO (Army), SNCO (Marine Corps) or civilian. For field artillery applications, the position commander or OIC may assume RSO duties. Grade requirements will be in accordance with table 1–1. Personnel assigned as RSO will have no other duties during that period of training, except for aviation weapons systems training where instructor pilots may assume RSO duties. Assistant range safety officers (ARSO) may be appointed as required. (b) Weapon system qualified. c) Certification of satisfactory completion of unit or installation range safety certification program. (2) Duties. (a) Receives range safety briefing from the installation range control organization on use of the ranges and training areas. (b) Ensures before granting clearance to fire— 1. Weapons and personnel are properly positioned. 2. Authorized ammunition and explosives, to include proper charge, fuze, and fuze settings are used. 3. Firing settings and weapons systems are within prescribed safety limits and verified. 4. SDZ is clear of all unauthorized personnel. 5. Proper hearing protection is worn by personnel within noise hazard areas. 6.

Proper eye protection is worn by personnel within eye hazard areas. 7. Permission is received from range control to commence training and live-fire operations. 8. Marine Corps RSOs (Hawk and Stinger) will comply with responsibilities listed in local SOPs. (c) Prior to commencing live-fire operations, conducts final coordination with the OIC. This coordination will include a summary of checks, inspections, and actions that the RSO has completed, verification that required communications has been established, and that a “hot status” has been received from range control. (d) Orders immediate cease-fire or check fire when any unsafe condition occurs. e) Is physically present at the training site. (f) Reports all accidents and ammunition malfunctions to the range OIC. (g) Verifies, upon completion of firing or firing order, to the OIC that all weapons and weapons systems are clear and safe before allowing the removal of weapons from the firing area. (h) During laser operations— 1. Ensures unit personnel employing lasers receive thorough safety briefings to include explanations of specific laser related hazards, safety equipment, and detailed range safety procedures, and comply with procedures in chapter 18 of this pamphlet. 2. Knows and observes horizontal and vertical safety limits of the laser range. 3.

Follows unit SOPs for laser operations and training exercises. 4. Ensures all personnel engaged in laser operations, to include personnel in target areas, maintain continuous communications. 5. Ceases laser operations immediately if communications or positive control of the laser beam is lost. 6. Allows the LRSO, as required, to serve as the RSO. (i) During ADA range firing with crew served guided missiles and rockets— 1. Receives missile and rocket firing advisory information from the senior RSO and advise the OIC accordingly. 2. Ensures the entire range is clear of unauthorized personnel and equipment prior to firing and maintains clearance throughout the entire firing sequence. i.

The senior range safety officer (SRSO). (1) A SRSO is required for ADA guided missile and rocket firing. In addition to requirements outlined in paragraph 1–6h, personnel assigned as SRSOs must meet the qualifications, and are responsible for duties outlined below. (2) Qualifications. (a) Field grade officer, CW4 or CW5 (Army), or civilian in the grade of GS–12 or above. (b) Weapon system qualified. (3) Duties. 6 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 (a) Ensures the safe conduct of all ADA crew served guided missile and rocket firings. (b) Enforces strict compliance with range safety standards and SOPs. (c) Ensures RSO(s) comply with responsibilities listed in paragraph 1–6h. d) Complies with the restrictions, requirements and procedures listed in local SOPs (Marine Corps RSOs (Stinger)). j. Trajectory safety officer (TSO). (1) In addition to qualifications and responsibilities outlined in paragraph 1–6h, personnel assigned as TSOs will meet the qualifications and are responsible for duties as outlined below. (2) Qualifications. (a) Officer, warrant officer, or civilian in the grade of GS–09 or above. (b) Weapon system qualified. (c) Appointed by the SRSO based on experience with ADA crew served guided missile and large rocket firings. (d) Technical knowledge and experience to adequately discharge TSO responsibilities. (e) Satisfactory completion of range safety certification program. 3) Duties. (a) Assists the SRSO. (b) Observes the trajectory of ADA crew served guided missiles and large rockets (or free ballistic rockets when provided with controllable destruct systems) to ensure missile or rocket containment within the boundaries of the SDZ. 1–7. Guidelines for range safety certification programs a. U. S. Army Range safety certification programs are used to train and qualify personnel in the duties of OIC and RSO for firing exercises and maneuver operations. Certification programs are normally implemented at battalion or equivalent level. Marine Corps OIC and RSO certifications will be conducted at the installation level only. b.

Unit safety certification programs will be integrated into organizational training. c. Once satisfied through training and testing that individuals are qualified to perform the duties of OIC and RSO of the firing unit, battalion commanders (U. S. Army) or installation commanders (Marine Corps) will certify, in writing, these individuals to range control. d. Personnel designated as OIC and RSO must receive a range safety briefing from the installation range control organization on the use of the training complex as part of certification. e. The effectiveness of safety programs for OICs and RSOs will be monitored by the installation range control officer and the installation safety officer. f.

Except for field artillery, a locally devised “Range Safety Card” program may be employed in lieu of unit generated rosters of certified personnel, if approved by the installation commander. g. The installation commander may reduce the OIC and RSO grade requirements in table 1–1 by not more than one grade, with the following exceptions: (1) OIC of battalion or larger combined arms live-fire exercises (CALFEX) will be a field grade officer. (2) RSO for Marine Corps will be E6 or above for hand grenades. (3) Marine Corps EOD units are exempt from OIC and RSO requirements. EOD units conducting EOD operations and training will supervise demolition and disposal operations following the guidance contained in NAVSEA OP5, NAVSEA SWO60–AA–MMA–010, and EODB 60 series publications.

Marine Corps EOD units conducting disassembly and inerting will assign a qualified EOD technician as an RSO. Commanding officers may designate in nonemergency SOPs other instances that require EOD to use an RSO. The RSO may be an E–5 or above if, they are currently qualified as an EOD officer or technician MOS 2305/2336. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 7 Chapter 2 Ranges 2–1. Restricting access to impact areas a. Unauthorized persons are prohibited from entering the installation training complex. When empowered, the installation range control officer is the approval authority for entry onto ranges and maneuver areas, and into any impact area (temporary, dedicated, or high hazard. ) b.

Unauthorized persons are prohibited from entering impact areas and other areas known or suspected to contain UXO by use of positive controls, to include fencing and posting of UXO hazard warning signs. For the Army, commanders will ensure appropriate fencing is used to restrict access to areas known or suspected to contain UXO. The commander will use risk management to determine the type and extent of fencing required. Primary factors to consider in making this risk decision are accessibility of the public to restricted locations and the level of UXO hazards in the area. Fencing will comply with security requirements and at a minimum consist of 3-strand barbed wire around UXO areas where public access is remote and hazards are low. c.

Where practical, positive means of excluding livestock (such as, fences, gates) must be established unless a written agreement negating this requirement with livestock owner(s) is in effect. d. Personnel who must enter an impact area will be thoroughly briefed on the hazards of UXO by the installation range control office and/or EOD personnel. e. Access into temporary and/or dedicated impact areas will be strictly controlled. Those portions of temporary and dedicated impact areas authorized for training or other authorized purposes will be surface cleared of dud ammunition before access is permitted. Cleared areas that become contaminated during live-fire exercises will be cleared when the exercise has been completed. f.

Personnel access to high hazard impact areas is limited to qualified EOD personnel, range control, range maintenance, and safety personnel designated by the installation range control officer. The installation commander may approve entry into impact areas by non-DOD personnel on a case-by-case basis. g. For the Marine Corps, personnel will not enter HE, dud-contaminated impact areas to extinguish fires. Fires in HE dud impact areas will be contained by employing fire fighting personnel and techniques on range perimeters outside fragmentation distance of known dud ordnance. For the Army, entry into HE dud contaminated areas to extinguish fires is an extremely high-risk operation that requires a thorough risk assessment and approval at the appropriate level of command. h.

Digging entrenchments, foxholes, slit trenches, or any other activities that disturbs earth within an impact area is not permitted unless authorized by the installation range control officer. Maneuvers within a temporary impact area that include bivouac must prevent disturbing earth by driving poles, pegs, and so forth, into the ground, trenching around tents, or any activity that could disturb a dud located just beneath the ground surface. Open fires will not be permitted. i. Unauthorized personnel are prohibited from handling UXO and munitions or removing them from the training complex. Procedures (for example, amnesty boxes) will be established for turn in of ammunition and explosives items by unauthorized personnel. j.

All normal vehicular and foot traffic approaches to ranges and impact areas will be guarded by range guards, properly instructed in their duties, or closed off by appropriate barriers, as determined by the installation range control officer. When barriers are used, appropriate signs will be posted. k. Aeronautical charts limit aerial access to ranges within restricted areas. However, when conducting firing in small arms range safety areas, not contained within restricted airspace, air guards should be posted, or other effective means employed, to watch for and report incursion by non-participating aircraft (Army only. ) 2–2. Posting warning signs and markers a.

Warning signs will be posted around the installation training complex to warn and prohibit entry by unauthorized persons, and to alert authorized personnel entering a hazard area. b. Warning signs will be placed to ensure they are visible to individuals attempting to enter training complex livefire areas at any point around its perimeter. They will be placed at 200-meter intervals or less, or in a way that will insure that a person cannot enter the range without seeing at least one sign within a legible distance. c. For the Army, commanders will ensure that appropriate, standardized UXO hazard signs are posted at a minimum of 200-m intervals around all UXO locations.

Effective with the publication of this pamphlet, all new UXO signs posted must conform to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard danger design specified by section 200b, part 1926, title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR 1926. 200b). New, standardized UXO signs, if constructed locally, are at least 33 centimeters (cm) by 43. 5 cm in overall size and of weather resistant materials. The sign will state “UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE—DO NOT ENTER” in two lines of red sans serif capital letters in the lower white section of the sign. Make lettering at least 5 cm high and of weather resistant materials. d. Signs at entry points to the training complex will prohibit trespassing and removal of items under penalties provided by law. Signs will also emphasize the dangers associated with unlawful entry and handling of dud ammunition.

Where appropriate, signs will be in both English and the applicable foreign language. 8 DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 e. Internal and external limit of fire markers will be placed to denote right and left limits of fire. See Training Circular (TC) 25–8 for limit of fire design requirements. When required, limit of fire markers will be illuminated to ensure proper target area identification at times of limited visibility. Limit of fire markers will be thermalized when thermal weapons sights are used. Appropriate hearing protection, eye protection, and laser warning signs will be posted at each range and firing line. 2–3. Controlling other range usage a.

When the installation training complex is authorized for use by nonmilitary organizations such as schools; county, municipal, state, or federal agencies; organized clubs (including rod and gun clubs); or civic associations, the following requirements apply. (1) The organization or agency will comply with requirements and procedures established by AR 385–63/MCO 3570. 1B, this pamphlet, and local range regulations and SOPs. (2) Requests for use will be coordinated with the installation range control office, safety office, and the Judge Advocate General (TJAG), and submitted to the installation commander for approval. (3) Requests will identify if non-DOD associated minors will be involved in firearms activities. If so, the activity must be an approved course of marksmanship training, unless otherwise approved by the installation commander. 4) A written agreement must be completed between the installation and the nonmilitary organization, detailing all rights and responsibilities of each party, liabilities, procedures, and regulatory and procedural requirements. This agreement will be incorporated into the report of availability as required by AR 405–80. (5) The nonmilitary organization designates an OIC and RSO. Personnel designated as OICs and RSOs will complete a pistol and rifle course approved by the National Rifle Association, or equivalent (for example, the U. S. Pistol Shooters Association). The installation commander, based on input from the range control officer, safety officer, TJAG, and other staff agencies, as appropriate, determine the equivalency. (6) The installation range control officer will ensure designated OIC and RSO are briefed on their duties and responsibilities. b.

Military family members engaging in authorized marksmanship training or participating in activities involving weapons firing, such as organizational or family days, will comply with this regulation, installation range regulations, and SOPs. Requests for these activities will specify if minors will be involved. c. Civilian personnel, such as military family members and local populace, must receive authorization from the installation range control officer to enter the training complex to participate in or observe capabilities exercises, fire power demonstrations, training courses, competitions, or other types of firing. Such personnel will remain in designated safe areas as determined by the installation range control officer. d.

Inspection team members, or other official observers required to be on the firing line, firing position, or firing area will position themselves in safe areas as determined by the installation range control officer. These personnel must wear appropriate safety equipment, as specified by the local range regulations and the installation range control officer. e. Civilians, to include family members and DOD civilians, must have approval from the installation range control officer to fire weapons within the installation training complex. 2–4. Coordinating use of special use airspace a. Airspace restrictions may be waived only by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Coordination for FAA waivers will be made by the installation Air Traffic and Airspace Officer (AT&A), through the ACOM/ASCC/DRU (Army Command/Army Service Component Command/Direct Reporting Unit) AT&A to the appropriate Department of the Army Regional Representative (DARR) or the Navy Representative (NAVREP) for the Marine Corps. Using units may obtain assistance in determining appropriate special use airspace (SUA) requirements for all planned activities from the installation and ACOM/ASCC/DRU AT&A and appropriate DARR. b. Any activity considered hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft or requiring SUA to segregate it from other users of the National Airspace System, or in airspace of host countries, will not be conducted until such SUA has been designated and activated for that purpose. c.

Types of activities that may require SUA include, but are not limited to: artillery fire, mortars, missiles and rockets, air-to-ground weapon systems, aerial target practice, laser operations, demolition and explosive devices, electronic warfare devices, remotely piloted and unmanned aerial vehicles, small arms ranges and any other activity considered to be hazardous or noncompatible with other users of the airspace. SUA is required to be designated and activated prior to conducting any activity over 45 meters (m) above ground level (AGL) (to include ricochet ordinates) that would be hazardous to aircraft except for activities authorized and conducted in a SARSA. d.

Special use airspace will be established and managed in accordance with AR 95–2 (Army). The installation AT&A officer is the focal point for SUA actions. For additional information and guidance contact the appropriate ACOM/ASCC/DRU AT&A officer or DARR. Special use airspace will be established and managed in accordance with appropriate FAA regulations, local SOPs, and range control procedures (Marine Corps). The installations range control officer, in cooperation with the air traffic control officer and the regional airspace coordinator, is the focal point for SUA actions. DA PAM 385–63 • 4 August 2009 9 e. Types of SUA that may be requested include, but are not limited to— (1) Restricted areas.

When activated, these exclude all nonparticipants who do not have authorization to enter and usually will not be designated below 1,200 feet AGL unless the proponent owns or otherwise controls the surface of the earth beneath the restricted area. Restricted areas will be designated when determined necessary to confine or segregate activities considered to be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft. (2) Controlled firing area (CFA). A CFA is established to contain activities that, if not conducted in a controlled environment, would be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft. It is the user’s responsibility to

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