quizes 1-5,14

True
Public speaking requires more formal language than everyday conversation
True
When you adjust to the situation of a public speech you are doing on a larger scale what you do everyday in conversation
True
Many of the symptoms of stage fright are due to adrenaline
True
Organizing ideas for presentation in a speech is an important aspect of critical thinking
True
A speakers frame of reference and a listener’s frame of reference will never be exactly the same
True
Most public speaking involves two-way communication
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True
Interference is anything that impedes the communication of a message
True
Interference can come from either inside or outside your audience
False
Although language changes from culture to culture, the meaning of nonverbal signals is consistent across cultures
False
Ethnocentrism is an advantage to public speakers who seek to understand the values, beliefs, and customs of audiences from different cultures
True
Ethical issues can arise at every stage of the speechmaking process
False
As the Roman rhetorician Quintilian noted 2,000 years ago, the ideal of speechingmaking is to persuade the audience by any means necessary
False
The ethical obligation of a speaker to avoid name-calling and other forms of abusive language is essentially a matter of political correctness
True
Taking someone’s entire speech and passing it off as your own is a form of unethical behavior called global plagiarism
False
If a web page is not copyright protected, then it is ethical to cut and paste sections of the page into your speech without citing your source
False
When citing an internet document in a speech, it is usually sufficient to introduce it by saing, “As I found on the Web”
True
Just as public speakers have ethical responsibilities, so too do the people who listen to a speech
False
All statements made by a public speaker are protected under the free speech clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
True
It is possible to disagree entirely with a speaker’s ideas but still support the speaker’s right to express those ideas
True
No matter how well intentioned they may be, efforts to protect society by restricting free speech usually end up repressing minority viewpoints and unpopular opinions
True
People need effective listening skills in almost all occupations
True
The aim of active listening is to set aside one’s own frame of reference and, as far as possible, to listen form within the speaker’s frame of reference
False
Appreciate listening is closely tied to critical thinking
False
Listening to understand a classroom lecture is an example of appreciative listening
True
You can improve your own speeches by listening carefully to the speeches of other people
True
Critical listening involves listening to evaluate a message for purposes of accepting it or rejecting it
False
Usually it is easy to block out physical and mental distractions when listening to a speaker
True
Jumping to conclusions can be a barrier to effective listening even a speaker and a listener know each other very well
True
Reviewing mentally what a speaker has said is a good way to avoid becoming distracted in a speech
True
Taking notes on a speaker’s key points and supporting material will help improve your listening ability and retention
False
After choosing a topic, the next step in speech preparation is determining your central idea
False
Once you choose the central idea of your speech, the next step is to formulate your general purpose
False
Most often, a speaker’s general purpose will fall into one of two categories – to inform or to demonstrate
False
The difference between informing and persuading is like the difference between explaining and entertaining
False
When your general purpose is to persuade, you act as a teacher or lecturer
False
The specific purpose of a speech usually “sums up” the main points to be developed in the body of the speech
False
Conducting regular car maintenance is an example of an effective specific purpose statement for a speech
False
The specific purpose statement should usually be phrased as a question
True
The central idea of a speech often emerges after you have done your research and have decided on the main points of the speech
False
“to persuade my audience that the federal government should institute a national sales tax to help pay for social programs” is an example of an effective central idea for a speech
False
The aim of successful speechmaking is to gain a desired response from listeners by any means necessary
False
Adapting to audiences is one of the easiest tasks facing beginning speakers
False
Audience analysis and adaptation affect all aspects of speechmaking except for the delivery of the speech itself
True
Even when listeners pay close attention, they don’t process a speaker’s message exactly as the speaker intended
True
Every speech contains two messages – the one sent by the speaker and the one received by the listener
False
Ethnocentrism means that audiences typically approach speeches by asking, “why is this important to me”
True
Identification refers to the process by which speakers seek to create a bond with audiences by emphasizing common values, goals, and experiences
True
Any characteristic of a given audience is potentially important to a speaker analyzing that audience
True
Gender, sexual orientation, age, race, ethnicity, and group membership are all factors to consider when conducting a demographic analysis
False
Because men and women in the US share a much broader range of experiences than they once did, gender is no longer a significant factor in demographic audience analysis
True
There are four kinds of informative speeches – speeches about objects, concepts, processes, and events
False
A lawyer urging a jury to acquit her client is an example of informative speaking
True
Informative speeches about processes are usually arranged in chronological order
False
“to inform my audience about theories of reincarnation” is a specific purpose for an informative about an object
False
Informative speeches about concepts are usually arranged in spatial order
False
A summary is seldom necessary in the conclusion of an informative speech
True
When giving an informative speech, you should think about ways to relate your topic to the audience in the body of the speech as well as in the introduction
False
Abstractions are especially helpful for clarifying ideas in informative speeches
False
Using description as a way to personalize ideas in an informative speech is recommended
True
Whenever possible, you should try to enliven your informative speeches by expressing ideas in personal terms