Pearson Practice test questions sped content

A new high school student is being assessed. He reads a 500 word text. He misreads 35 words. at what level is he reading?
a. instructional
b. independent
c. unsatisfactory
d. merit
A. Instrcuctional
According to the Assistive Technology Act, assistive devices are:
a. electronic devices that support learning such as computers, calculators, student responders, electronic self-teaching books and electronic reading devices.
b. any mechanical, electrical or electronic device that helps teachers streamline efficiency
c. any device that could help a disabled student in school or life functions
d. experimental, high-tech teaching tools that teachers can obtain by participating in one of 67 government funded research projects
C. any device that could help a disabled student in school or life functions
in the first week of school, a resource teacher asks her high school students to make lists of things they know how to do well. How is this activity MOST useful to the teacher?
a. it establishes a feeling of success in her students from the start
b. it is an informal assessment of their writing skills and gives the teacher an idea of each student’s interests and abilities
c. it is a formal assessment of prior knowledge
d. it invites further discussion of each student’s unique contributions and will help the class bond with mutual respect
b. it is an informal assessment of their writing skills and gives the teacher an idea of each studetn’s interests and abilities. Test: Writing Skills
How could the teachers use the students’ lists in her lesson planning?
a. on the last day of school, she can return the lists and ask the students to add the new skills they’ve learned, so they can see how far they’ve come
b. she can have the students exchange lists so they can find other students who share the same interests
c. she can use the lists when planning independent reading and research projects for each student
d. all of the above
d. all of the above
a seventh grader with mild intellectual disabilities is having considerable trouble with algebra. His stepfather is trying to help, but the more he drills the girl, the less she seems to understand. the teacher suggests:
a. he continues drilling and enphases with pop quizzes. it may take the student longer to understand algebraic terms, expressions and e3quations, but with hard work she will eventually learn them
b. he calls a moratorium on at-home algebra work. the student is becoming less willing to work at school and the teacher is concered she is losing confidence due to failrure at home.
c. he continues drilling but breaks the study sessions into no more than 3 five-minute periods per day
d. he substitutes fun acitivities for math drills. incorporating algebra blocks, math games, and applications of algebra to real-life situations will make math more fun and more relevant
d. he substitutes fun acitivities for math drills. incorporating algebra blocks, math games, and applications of algebra to real-life situations will make math more fun and more relevant
augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices, forearm crutches and a head pointer are assistive devices that might be used by a student with:
a. severe mental retardation
b. cerebral palsy
c. tourette syndrome
d. minor skeletal birth defects
b. cerebral palsy
A four year old child has difficulty sorting plastic cubes, circles and triangles by color and shape, doesn’t recognize patters or groups and doesn’t understand the relationship between little/big, tall/short, many/few. the child enjoys counting, but does not say the numbers with proper order nor recognize the meaning of different numbers. this child most likely:
a. is exhibiting signs of mental retardation
b. is developing within an acceptable range
c. has dysgraphia
d. has dyscalculia
d. has dyscalculia
Response to Intervention (RtI) is:
a. parents, classroom teacher, sped teacher and other caring persons stage an intervention to express how a student’s socially unacceptable behavior upsets them
b. an opportunity for a student to openly and freely respond to specific interventions without fear of reprimand
c. a strategy for diagnosing learning disabilities in which a student receives research-supported interventions to correct an academic delay. if the interventions do not result in considerable improvement, the failure to respond suggests causal learning disabilities
d. a formal complaint lodged by a parent or guardian in response to what they consider an instruction by a teacher into private matters
c. a strategy for diagnosing learning disabilities in which a student receives research-supported interventions to correct an academic delay. if the interventions do not result in considerable improvement, the failure to respond suggests causal learning disabilities
sixth graders Alfie and Honesty ride the same bus. Honesty constatnly teases Alfie. Alfie is embarrassed because he believes she is berating him. the bus driver told their reacvher it was possible that Honesty is actually interested in Alfie, but doesn’t express it well. The best form of conflict resolution would be for the teacher to:
a. take honesty aside and explain boys don’t like overly aggressive girls
b. take Honesty aside and teach her less embarrassing methods of getting a boy’s attention
c. explain to Alfie that Honesty probably teases him becasuse she likes him and he shoulkd take it as a compliment
d. suggest to Alfie that if he is disturbed by Honesty’s teasing, he have a calm, assertive conversation with her and tell her he doesn’t like it and insist she stop
d. suggest to Alfie that if he is disturbed by Honesty’s teasing, he have a calm, assertive conversation with her and tell her he doesn’t like it and insist she stop
A special ed teacher is creating a developmental history for a high school student. she wants to know when the teen reached certain behavioral, academic and developmental milestones. she should consult:
a. the student’s previous teachers. this information should be in the file
b. the studenty. involving him in the process will make him more interested in his progress
c. the student’s doctor and therapist. these professionals know how to elicit and codument this informaiton
d. the parent/guardian because he/she has known the student from the beginning
d. the parent/guardian because he/she has known the student from the beginning
when transitioning from one subject to another and when she becomes anxious, a student always taps her front tooth 5 timesthen opens and closes her eyes 11 times before leaving her desk. the student most likely has:
a. repetitive disorder
b. obsessive compulsive disorder
c. anxiety disorder
d. depression
b. obsessive compulsive disorder
by law, a child with a disability is defined as one with:
a. mental retardation, hearing, speech, language, visual, orthopedic or other health impairments, emotional disturbance, autism, brain injury caused by trauma or specific learning disabilities and needs special education and related services
b. mental retardation, emotional disturbance, autism, brain injury caused by trauma or specific learning disabilities who needs special education and related services
c. a child who is unable to reach the same academic goals as his peers, regardless of cause, and needs special edcuation and related services
d. the term “disability” is no longer used. the correct term is “other ability”
a. mental retardation, hearing, speech, language, visual, orthopedic or other health impairments, emotional disturbance, autism, brain injury caused by trauma or specific learning disabilities and needs special education and related services
which classroom environment is most likely to support a student with ADHD?
a. students with ADHD become bored easily so a classroom with distinct areas for a multitude of activities will stimulate her. when she loses interest in one area, she can move to the next and continue learning
b. students with ADHD are highly aggressive and easily fall into depression. the teacher needs to provide a learning environment in which sharp objects such as scissors, tacks or sharpened pencils are eliminated. this ensures greater safety for both studetn and teacher
c. students with ADHD are highly creative. a room with brightly colored mobiles, a multitude of visual and physical textures and plenty of art-based games will stimulate and encourage learning
d. students with ADHD are extremely sensitive to distractions. a learning environment in which visual and audio distractions have been eliminated is best. low lighting, few posters and a clean whiteboard help the student focus
d. students with ADHD are extremely sensitive to distractions. a learning environment in which visual and audio distractions have been eliminated is best. low lighting, few posters and a clean whiteboard help the student focus
a resource teacher notices one of her students has made the same reading error numerous times the past few days. she decides the student wrongly believes that ‘ou’ is always pronounced as it is in the word through. she corrects this misunderstanding by showing the student word families continaing words like though, ought, ground. this strategy is called:
a. corrective feedback
b. positive reinforcement
c. consistend repetition
d. corrective support
a. corrective feedback
a kindergarten teacher has a new student who will not make eye contact with anyone so she doesn’t appear to be listening. she often rocks back and forth and does not stop when asked or give any indication she has heard. she avoids physical contact. sometimes the teacher must take her arm to guide her from one place to another. occasionally the student erupts, howling in terror and fury. the most likely diagnosis is:
a. asperger’s syndrome
b. obessive-compulsive disorder
c. autism
d. antisocial psychosis
c. autism
a sped teacher shows parents of a dyslexic child a study that examined brain scans of dyslexic and non-dyslexic readers. the student demonstrated that dyslexics use the ______ side(s) of their brains while non-dyslecis use the _____ side.
a. both, the left
b. both the right
c. left, right
d. right, left
a. both, the left
a student with ______ has a great deal of difficulty with the mechanical act of writing. she drops her pencil, cannot form legible letters and cannot decode what she has written.
a. a nonverbal learning disorder
b. dyslexia
c. dyspraxia
d. dysgraphia
d. dysgraphia
a resource room teacher has a middle school student recently diagnosed with depression. the student has been put on an antidepressant. the teacher knows the student may develop certain transitory reactions to the medication. one reaction might be:
a. extreme sleepiness
b. increased, persistent thirst
c. anxiet, coupled with an urge to verbalize a coninuous inner dialogue
d. inappropriate anger
b. increased, persistent thirst
reading comprehension should be evaluated:
a. every two months using various informal assessments. done more than twice a year, assessments place undue stress on both student and teacher and do not indicate enough change to be worth it
b. with a combination of informal and formal assessments including: standardized testing, awareness of grades, systematically charted data over a period of time and teacher notes
c. with bi-weekly self-assessment rubrics to keep the student aware of his progress
d. by testing the student before reading a particular text to determine which vocab words he already knows and can correctly use
b. with a combination of informal and formal assessments including: standardized testing, awareness of grades, systematically charted data over a period of time and teacher notes
a diabetic first grader is very pale, trembling and covered in a fine sweat. the teacher attempts to talk to the child, but the girl’s response is confused and she seems highly irritable. she is most likely experiencing:
a. diabetic hypoglycemia
b. lack of sleep
c. hunger
d. diabetic hyperglycemia
a. diabetic hypoglycemia
a mentally retarded teen has been offered a job by an elderly neighbor. the neighbor wants the teen to work alongside her in the garden twice a week. they will plant seeds, transplant larger plants, weed, lay mulch, water and fertilize. later in the season, they will cut flowers and arrange bouquets, pick produce and sell them in the neighbor’s roadside stand. the neighbor, the teen’s mother and sped teacher meet to discuss the proposal. the plan is:
a. tentatively accepted. because the teen is excited about having a job, her mother and teacher reluctantly agree. they both know the girl is likely to lose interest quickly and caution the neighbor that if she truly needs help she may want to look elsewhere. however, no one wants to disappoint the girl and all decide the experience will be good for her.
b. rejected. despite the teen’s instistence she can manage these tasks, her mother and teacher believe she cannot. they fear trying will set her up for failure
c. rejected. the teacher and her mother are very uncomfortable with the neighbor’s offer. they suspect the elderly woman is simply lonely or may be a predator who has selected a mentally retarded victim because such children are particularly vulnerable.
d. enthusiastically accepted. the adults discuss a background check and the possibility the teen might discover gardening is not for her and want to quit. however, this is most likely to happen early in her employment, giving the neighbor sufficient time to find another helper
d. enthusiastically accepted. the adults discuss a background check and the possibility the teen might discover gardening is not for her and want to quit. however, this is most likely to happen early in her employment, giving the neighbor sufficient time to find another helper
Dr. Gee reads the following sentence to a group of 5th graders: “the turquoise sky is reflected in the still lake. fat white clouds floated on the lake’s surface as though the water was really another sky. it was such a beautiful day. the students were to write the word “beautiful” in the blank. one student wrote ‘pretty’ instead. this suggests:
a. the student doesn’t know the meaning of the word ‘beautiful’
b. the student is highly creative and believes he can substitute a word with a similar meaning
c. the student did not know how to spell beautiful
d. the student did not hear what the teacher said. he heard ‘pretty’ instead of beautiful
c. the student did not know how to spell beautiful
autism spectrum disorder is also known as:
a. pervasive spectrum disorder
b. asperger’s syndrome
c. variable developmental disorder
d. artistic continuum syndrome
a. pervasive spectrum disorder
a third grade boy is new to the school. his teacher has noticed he happily plays with other children, redirects his attention without upset when another child rejects his offer to play and doesn’t mind playing on his own. however, the boy doesn’t pay attention when academic inst4ruction is given. he continues to speak with other children, draws, or distracts himself. the teacher reminds him repeatedly to listen and follow instrcuction. when he doses not, she moves him to a quiet desk away from the tohers. when isolated, the boy puts his head head on the desk and weeps uncontrollably, or stares at a fixed spot and repeats to himself, “i hate myself, i hate myself. i should be dead.” during these episodes, the teacher cannot break through to the student; his diconnection seems complete. the teacher has requested a conference with his parents, but they do not speak English and have not responded to her offer of a translator. the teacher should:
a. establish a consistent set of expectations for the child. he needs to understand there are appropriate times for play and for learning
b. isolate the boy first thing. his behavior suggests manipulation. by third grade children fully understand they are expected to pay attention when the teacher is speaking. the boy is punishing the teacher sith tears and repetitive slef-hate, consciously or unconsciously attempting to make the teacher feel guildty
c. immediately refer him to a counselor. the boy is exhibiting serous emotional distress suggesting abuse or neglect at home or outside of school
d. recognize the student’s highly sensitive nature; offer comfort when he acts out self-loathing. carefully expl.alin why he must learn to pay attention so he can use reason instead of emotion when making future choices
c. immediately refer him to a counselor. the boy is exhibiting serous emotional distress suggesting abuse or neglect at home or outside of school
a student with asperger’s syndrome is most likely to display which set of behaviors?
a. he is confrontational, argumentative and inflexible
b. he is fearful, shy and highly anxious
c. he is socially distant, focused on certain subjects to the point of obsession and inflexible
d. he is flighty, tearful and exhibits repetitive, ritualized behavior
c. he is socially distant, focused on certain subjects to the point of obsession and inflexible
a sped teacher working with a group of third graders is about to begin a unit on birds. she asks the children what they know about birds. they tell her birds fly, lay eggs and build nests. she askes the students to draw a picture of a bird family. some children draw birds in flight; one draws a mother bird with a nest of babies; antoher draws an egg with the baby bird inside the egg. these pre-reading activities are useful because:
a. they help assess prior knowledge
b. they establish a framework in which to integrate the new information
c. they create a sense of excitement and curiousity
d. all of the above
d. all of the above
verbal dyspraxia is:
a. trouble with the physical act of writing
b. refusal to speak
c. misplacing letters within words
d. a motor skill development disorder which includes inconsistent speech errors
d. a motor skill development disorder which includes inconsistent speech errors
a resource room teacher has a small group of second and third gradeers who are struggling with reading comprehension. a useful strategy would be to:
a. present a list of vocab words before students read a particular text
b. ask students to create a play about the story
c. read a story aloud. ask students to raise their hands when they hear an unfamiliar word
d. have each child keep a book of new vocab words. whenever an unfamiliar is seen or heard the student should enter the word in her personal dictionary
b. ask students to create a play about the story
tourette syndrome is characterized by:
a. facial twitches, grunts, inappropriate words or body spasms
b. inappropriate words, aggressive behavior and tearful episodes
c. facial twitches, trungs, extreme shyness and refusal to make eye contact
d. refusal to make eye contact, rocking, spinning of objectrs and ritualized behavior
a. facial twitches, grunts, inappropriate words or body spasms
a second grader finds it impossible to remain in her seat. she wanders around the room, sprawls on the floor and rolls back and forth when asked to do math problems and jumps up and down when waiting in line. when the teacher tells her to sit down, she rolls her eyes in apparent disgust and looks to toher students for support. when she finds a student looking back, she laughs and makes a face. the teacher has noticed when a reward is attached to good behavior; the girl is consistently able to control her actions for long periods of time. but when reprimanded without the promise of a reward, she becomes angry, tearful and pouts. this child is most likely manifesting:
a. tourett’s syndrome
b. ADHD
c. lack of sufficiently developed behavior and social skills
d. psychosis
c. lack of sufficiently developed behavior and social skills
ADHD refers to:
a. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
b. anxiety/depression hyperactivity disorder
c. aggression-depression hyperactivity disorder
d. atkinson, draper and hutchinson disability
a. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
rate, accuracy and prosody are elements of:
a. reading fluency
b. reading comprehension
c. math fluency
d. algebraic function
a. reading fluency
when a diabetic studetn goes into insulin shock, she should:
a. call her parents to come get her
b. drink a soda or eat some hard candy
c. drink a high-protein shake
d. put her head on the desk and wait for the episode to pass
b. drink a soda or eat some hard candy
strategies to inscrease reading fluency for ELLs include:
a. tape-assisted reading
b. reading aloud while students follow along in their books
c. asking parents to read with the child each evening
d. a and b
d. a and b
how could a teacher effectively use a picture book of folk tales from an ELL’s country or origin?
a. share the book with other students to educate them about the ELL’s culture
b. ask teh ELL to rewrite the folk tale, modernizing it and using the US as the setting
c. ask the student to tell one folk tale in her native language. the teacher writes key words English words and asks the child to find them in the book. when the child finds the words, they read them together
d. non of the above. it
c. ask the student to tell one folk tale in her native language. the teacher writes key words English words and asks the child to find them in the book. when the child finds the words, they read them together
what kind of load does the previous example employ?
a. cognitive
b. language
c. bilingual
d. cultural
d. cultural
a teacher asks an ELL to do a picture walk through a book and describe what he thinks the story is about. this helps the student’s awareness of the story’s _____.
a. deeper meaning
b. theme
c. context
d. events
d. events
Language load is:
A. The weight of books in a child backpack or the damage to the child’s body the weight may cause in the future
B. The vocabulary child has up on entering a new classroom
C. The number of unrecognizable words an ELL encounters when reading a passage or listening to a teacher
D. The number of languages a person has mastered
C. The number of unrecognizable words an ELL encounters when reading a passage or listening to a teacher
When working with ELLs, teachers should:
A. Avoid idioms and slang, involves students in hands-on activities, reference students prior knowledge, speak slowly
B. Speak slowly, mono syllabic words when possible, repeat each sentence 3 times, use idioms but not slang
C. Use monosyllabic words when possible, repeat key instruction 3 times but not in a row, reference students prior knowledge, have students keeping a journal of new vocabulary words
D. Used both idioms and slang, reference students prior knowledge, speak at a normal rate of speed, involve students in hands-on activities
A. Avoid idioms and slang, involves students in hands-on activities, reference students prior knowledge, speak slowly
Word recognition is:
A. One of the building blocks of learning
B. Useful early to fluent readers
C. Culturally based
D. Especially important to English language learners and students with reading disabilities
D. Especially important to English language learners and students with reading disabilities
Assessing silent reading fluency can best be accomplished by:
A. Having the student summarize the material to determine how much was understood
B. Giving you written test which covers plot, theme, character development, sequence of events, rising action, climax, falling action and outcome. A student must test at a 95% accuracy rate to be considered fluent at silent reading
C. Giving a3 minute test of silent contextual reading fluency 4 times a year
D. Silent reading fluency cannot be assessed. It is a private act between the reader and the text and does not invite critique
C. Giving a 3-minute test a silent contextual reading fluency 4 times a year
Explicit instruction includes:
A. Clarify the goal, modeling strategy and offering explanation geared to a students level of understanding
B. Determining the goal, offering strategies and asking questions design to ascertain if understanding has been reached
C. Reassessing the goal, developing strategies and determining if further reassessing of the goal is required
D. Objectifying the goal, assessing strategies and offering explanations geared to a student’s level of understanding
A. Clarify the goal, modeling strategies and offering explanations geared to a student’s level of understanding
An ORF is:
A. Oral reading fluency assessment
B. An occasional reading function assessment
C. The Oscar Reynolds Feinstein assessment
D. An overt reading failure assessment
A. An oral reading fluency assessment
The four types of bilingual special education instructional delivery methods include:
A. Bilingual support model, coordinated services model, integrated bilingual special education, bilingual special education model
B. Bilingual instructional education, coordinating instruction, disintegrative support, bilingual special education model
C. Integrated, disintegrative, bilingual support, corresponding services
D. Special instructional education, bilingual instruction, bilingual delivery, special support education
A. Bilingual support model, coordinated services model, integrated bilingual special education, bilingual special education model
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that members of an IEP team include:
A. All teachers involved with the students, the parent or guardian and the student if appropriate
B. The classroom teacher, special education teacher, the parent or guardian, a representative of the local education Agency knowledgeable about specialized instruction, someone to interpret instructional implications, the student if appropriate and other people invited by the parents or the school
C. The classroom teacher, special education teacher, the principal or ap and the parent or guardian
D. All teachers involved with the student, the principal or AP, the parent or guardian and the student if appropriate
B. The classroom teacher, special education teacher, the parent or guardian, a representative of the Local Education Agency knowledgeable about specialized instruction, someone to interpret instructional implications, the student if appropriate and other people invited by the parents or the school
At the beginning of each month, a student reads a page or two from a book he hasn’t seen before. The resource teacher notes the total number of words in the section and the number of times the student leaves out or miss read a word. If the student reads with more then a 10 percent error rate, he is:
A. Reading with full comprehension
B. Probably bored and his attention is wandering
C. Reading at a frustration level
D. Missing contextual clues
C. Reading at a frustration level
A close test is:
A. Reading fluency
B. Understanding of context and vocab
C. Phonemic skills
Ability to apply the alphabetic principle to previously unknown material
B. Understanding of context and vocab
A kindergarten teacher is showing students the written alphabet. The teacher pronounces a phoneme and one student points to it on the alphabet chart. The teacher is presenting:
A. Letter sound correspondence
B. Rote memorization
C. Predictive analysis
D. Segmentation
A. Letter sound correspondence
The 9th grade special education teacher is giving students strategies for taking a maze test. There will be several paragraphs in which some words have been blanked out. There are five possible answers for each blank. The best approach is to:
A. Read all answers, mark out any that are illogical. Plugin the remaining words and mark out those that are grammatically incorrect or do not sound right. Think about context clues
B. Read the first answer. If it is logical and sound correct, select that word and move on
C. Cover the answers and try to guess what the correct word is. Look at the five choices. Select the one closest in meaning to the word guessed
D. Do the first and last questions then one in the middle look for a pattern and select the remaining words accordingly
A. Real all answers, mark out any that are illogical and sounds correct. Plug in the remaining words and mark out those that are grammatically incorrect or do not sound right. Think about context clues
A resource teacher wants to design a lesson that will help first and second graders learn sight words so all the students can read their list. She should teach them how to:
A. Divide sight words into syllables
B. Recognize word families. Organizing similar words allows patterns to emerge
C. Sound out the words by vocalizing each letter
D. Memorize their list by using techniques
D. Memorize their list by using techniques such as songs, mnemonic devices and other fun activities. By definition, sight words cannot be decoded but must be recognized on site
Phonological awareness activities are:
A. Oral
B. Visual
C. Both A & B
D. Systematically based
A. Oral
It is important to teach life skills to developmentally delayed students to prepare them for life after school. Which of the following skills sets should the students be taught?
A. Count money, plan meals, grocery shop, recognize safety concerns
B. Count money, order delivery meals, dating skills, how to drive
C. How to drive, style and hygiene tips, social strategies, dating skills
D. Stock market investment, hairdressing, house painting, pet care
A. Count money, plan meal, grocery shop, recognize safety concern

.

What is the purpose of using psychological tests to evaluate students with special needs? Include at least four important guidelines for interpreting the results of psychological test reports.

Students should include the following points:

The overall purpose of psychological tests is to measure abilities that affect how efficiently students learn in an instructional situation.Expect reports to be translated into instructionally relevant language.Corroborate test results with classroom experience.Check the technical adequacy of the psychological tests.Be aware that psychological tests may discriminate against persons from culturally different or disadvantaged backgrounds in the following ways:Inappropriate content
inappropriate standardization samples
Examiner language
Inequitable social consequences
Measurement of different constructsDifferent predictive validity

What components must be included in a student’s IEP?
Present levels of performance
Annual goals and short-term objectives
Statement of the special education model and related services
The extent, if any, to which the student will not participate with nondisabled peers in general education classroom
Testing modifications
Projected date for beginning of services and anticipated frequency, location, and duration of services
How progress will be measured
Write a fictitious case study in which the basic steps of the special education process are illustrated
Prereferral intervention—if not successful, then employ Response to Intervention (RTI)
Identification of a disability
Plan IEP
Place in LRE
Implement
Review and evaluate