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Nutrition

Perhaps you’re looking to boost your physical performance; or maybe you want to drop a few extra pounds. What if you Just want to learn how to eat healthier? When you’re In need of nutrition advice, who should you turn too? A registered tattletale? A nutritionist? Who’s the qualified nutritional professional? (Don’t forget to look up) Throughout this presentation, Ill be discussing the terminology In the name; reasons why It should It should be regulated In Arizona, and Impact It has to the public. .

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This can be a confusing topic for the public.

Aren’t dietitians and nutritionists the name thing? NO Although often used interchangeably, “registered dietitian” is not synonymous with “nutritionist. ” Nutritionist is not a professionally regulated term?there are no minimum academic or training qualifications; which means that anyone can use the title “nutritionist “and give nutrition advice, even If they have absolutely no background In nutrition In the state of Arizona . In contrast, registered tattletale Is a professionally regulated term. The registered tattletale credential Is earned by completing a minimum of a four-year nutrition degree In an American Dietetic

Association accredited program: a minimum of 1200 hours of supervised practice experience in dietetics, and the successful passage of the nationally administered board exam. In addition, the registered dietitian is required to complete 75 hours of approved continuing education credits every five years to maintain their registration. This is because as a dietitian you need to stay on top of the game, and know what’s going on. However, if you’re looking to work with someone always do background information, and if thieve with an accredited program that’s based off science and not the latest fad.

Currently some, but not all states provide licensee to nutrition professionals, Limiting the use of a particular title, such as tattletale, to those meeting certain academic and training requirements few states mandate that only licensed nutritional professionals can provide nutritional counseling. It seems ironic that there are licenses regulating the practice of over 100 professionals from manicurist and barber to mortician, yet, in many states anyone can call them self a nutritionist and give out nutrition advice. You should also be aware that certification is not the same as censure. Next slide with state map) Why haven’t states such Eke Arizona licensed dietitians in the past? Unfortunately, the vital link between nutrition and health has only recently received the attention it deserves. In addition, science has proven that nutrition plays an important part in the prevention and treatment of many serious diseases. Dietitians are now more recognized as healthcare professionals because of their educational background and experience. This Is Indicated by the fact that since 1984, 41 states have passed laws recognizing as nutrition experts. But In Arizona, there Is no statue.

If I want to call myself a nutritionist today, I can. And a major concern of unqualified nutrition misinformation. Their nutritional claims can be without scientific support, and it can lead to misinterpretation of nutrition science as whole – in a way discredit their hard work that they’ve put into the research. Such misinformation can be used to fuel food faddish, quackery, (Quackery is the promotion of unproven or fraudulent medical practices. ) health fraud, and can negatively impact the health and economic status of consumers. Which lead me to How has the public been harmed by Arizona not accessing dietitians.

With the explosion of interest in healthy eating and nutrition, consumers have been faced with a dizzying array of products and information. The public deserves to know that the information being given by “experts” is based on science and is being given by individuals with appropriate education and experience. This is especially true of individuals who have medical conditions, which could be adversely affected by improper nutrition counseling. Several states have documented cases of unqualified individuals giving improper nutritional advice, which has harmed patients.

Unfortunately, many cases of healthcare fraud are never reported. A Congressional study on Quackery noted that state offices on aging ranked healthcare fraud (quackery) first as the area of abuse of most concern and with the greatest impact on seniors. The report also acknowledged that the great majority of cases are never reported. Misinformed consumers are placing themselves at major nutritional and health risks by not only delaying appropriate, effective healthcare but replacing it with products, procedures or behaviors that are, at best, ineffective, and at worst harmful to their health.

In addition many of the products and services promoted by unqualified nutrition consultants such like in the gym setting and can expensive. And this may cause excessive financial burden to the consumer. And again, unqualified nutrition consultants often use testimonials and unpublished or fabricated research to support their claims, while as registered dietitians use evidenced-based practice that is supported by data published in peer-reviewed scientific Journals.

And that leads us to a huge concern with Nutrition “experts” thrive in the athletic arena; yet few of these self-proclaimed experts would qualify as such eased on academic training and professional practice. While few athletes would consider taking strength training or fitness advice from a dietitian, many have no problem taking nutrition advice from a strength coach, personal trainer or equally unqualified individual. BUYER BEWARE Even if the information handed isn’t free, the consumer would be wise to evaluate the information: The Source ? is it from a qualified nutrition professional (I. . , registered dietitian) or one that lacks appropriate qualifications (I. E. , a nutritionist, personal trainer, strength coach, etc. ) The Content ? s it credible? You should seek to determine if the information is supported by scientific research published in peer- reviewed scientific Journals. If the answer to either or both of these questions is no, then your health and sports performance will likely take a hit. In conclusion, 1. Why should dietitians and nutritionists be licensed?

Licensing of dietitians and nutritionists protects the public health by establishing minimum educational and experience criteria for those individuals who hold themselves out to be experts in food and nutrition. The state has an obligation to protect the health and safety of the public and licensing of dietitians and nutritionists is consistent with this obligation. We have the ability and responsibility to urge consumers and lawmakers to learn about the positive role nutrition plays in healthy lifestyles and in disease management and treatment.

For both individuals and society, the benefits of eating right and exercising include improved qualities of life and lower health-care costs. Your activism is extremely important to the success of our national and state agenda – and there are numerous ways to get involved. Reach out and contact our state and federal representatives: Write your legislator a letter Send your legislator a fax Send your legislator a direct e-mail Call an elected official directly And also educate others by spreading the word about important issues Like on media sources, such as faceable and twitter.

Possible Questions from Short Answers – Gotten from : http://www. Deteriorate. Org/images/stories/documents/licensee/ Licensee_Full_Backgrounder_2011 . PDF 5. Would licensee prohibit anyone except dietitians from giving nutritional advice? No. Licensee would not affect anyone that simply describes the nutritional value of products nor would it affect other latherer professionals. It would, however, provide recourse for victims of unqualified and unscrupulous individuals dispensing improper advice. 6. Aren’t too many professions and occupations already licensed by states?

It is the obligation of state legislatures to determine which professions and occupations should be licensed. A compelling case can be made for licensee of dietitians and nutritionists as healthcare professionals. 7. Isn’t licensee an attempt to monopolize the nutrition industry? No. The first obligation of registered dietitians and nutritionists is to serve the public, not sell rodents or services. Licensee is necessary because the public deserves to know which individuals have the educational background and experience to give nutritional advice.

The health food and dietary supplement industry is booming, even in states that have had licensee for many years. The key issue in licensee is accountability. The monopolizing argument is a desperate attempt to obscure the real issues of licensee. 8. Will licensing reduce competition or result in costlier services? No. Once again, licensee is not an attempt to control any market. Licensee allows the public to now which individuals are qualified by education and experience to provide nutritional services.

If unqualified individuals disseminate harmful nutrition information, licensee allows the state to take action on behalf of the public against those unqualified individuals. Competition among open and honest individuals with the publics health and safety foremost in their minds will continue to grow and the Won’t licensee cost the state a lot of money? No. Fees will provide most of the revenue. Many states have approved legislation or rules to make licensee revenue neutral. Amendment ‘X, U. S. Constitution The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. Notice and Declaration of 9th Amendment Rights l, the undersigned, hereby declare the following natural and God-given rights, as reserved to the people, under the 9th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America and which rights I reserve as follows: I reserve the right to seek or ask nutritional advice, counsel, information, recommendations, assessments, evaluations, tests and/or treatment(s), regimen(s), or modality(s) from the nutritionist(s) or doctor of my choice for any health reason or repose.

I reserve the right to select or reject any individual(s) as my personal nutritionist(s) whether that individual be a Medical Doctor, Herbalist, Chiropractor, Health Food Store Clerk, Druggist, Nurse, Salesperson of health products, Naturopath, Naturopath, Radiologist, Colon Therapist, Priest, Pastor, Indian Medicine Man, Relative, Friend, Dietitian or anyone from the general citizenry who has, or has not, any known formal training or claimed knowledge, education, insights, or qualifications to be my nutritionist.

I reserve the right to Freedom of Choice in Medicine in its most liberal construction including the right to choose my own diet; obtain, purchase and use any treatment, therapy, regimen, modality, herb, drug, food, medicine or health product for any health condition I have or may have as evaluated by myself, the doctor, nutritionist, or therapist of my choice. Citation – Dietitian vs. Nutritionist . (n. D. ). Dietitian vs. Nutritionist .