Media 1 – Chapter 8 (3)

Which of the following eras of journalism best represents the historical arrival of newspapers as a mass medium?
A. Penny press
B. Partisan press
C. Literary journalism
D. Interpretive reporting
Penny Press
Yellow journalism is ______.

-a journalism term from the 1950s for small-town papers and reporting styles
-a journalism term for federally funded newspaper archives in the 1960s and 1970s
-a journalism trend that began in the late 1800s stressing profit and featuring human interest stories, crime news, and large headlines
-a 1980s industry term for PR-generated stories
-journalism written by journalists afraid to challenge public or political leaders

a journalism trend that began in the late 1800s stressing profit and featuring human interest stories, crime news, and large headlines
The modern legacy of the style of journalism practiced by Joseph Pulitzer and William
Randolph Hearst includes ______.

-investigative journalism or otherwise investigating stories in depth to expose corruption
-striving for objectivity in reporting
-supermarket tabloid headlines that include clearly fictional accounts as well as
sensational and largely made up stories about celebrities
-Both A (investigative journalism) and B (striving for objectivity) are correct.
-Both A (investigative journalism) and C (supermarket tabloid headlines) are correct.

supermarket tabloid headlines that include clearly fictional accounts as well as
sensational and largely made up stories about celebrities
By the end of the nineteenth century, crusading newspapers like the New York World had what kind of approach to women’s rights?
-They were against them.
-They championed conservative values and the status quo.
-They hired women as reporters and crusaded for better conditions for women.
-They hired mostly women for management positions.
-None of the options is correct.
They hired women as reporters and crusaded for better conditions for women
Modern journalism started to develop in the nineteenth century mainly because newspapers ______.

-felt a social responsibility to tell the truth
-realized there were two sides to every issue
-discovered a scientific method for covering events
-wanted to attract as many readers and advertisers as possible
-All of the above.

wanted to attract as many readers and advertisers as possible
Select the correct historical order among the following major eras in journalism history.
-partisan journalism-penny press-yellow press-objective news
-penny press-partisan journalism-objective news-yellow press
-partisan journalism-objective news-penny press-yellow press
-yellow press-penny press-partisan journalism-objective news
yellow press-penny press-partisan journalism-objective news
Objective journalism as championed by Adolph Ochs and the New York Times was particularly good at ______.

-helping readers understand the complexities of the modern age by offering insightful analysis and context
-moving the practice of journalism out of the realm of sensationalism
-exploring journalism’s ties to storytelling by adopting a more literary model
-appealing to working-class readers
-All of the above.

moving the practice of journalism out of the realm of sensationalism
Which of the following statements about the inverted pyramid style is true?

-A story using this style typically begins with answering “who, what, when, and where.”
-It serves as a quick and efficient way to organize a news story.
-It strives for a form of “objectivity” that is more likely to be accepted by people with different backgrounds and beliefs.
-It can lead to formulaic stories.
-All of the above

All of the above
The practice of interpretive journalism in the twentieth century got its first significant boost
from ______.

-print journalism, which then passed the practice along to radio
-radio broadcasters who started developing commentary as part of their news in the 1930s
-the introduction of television
-a push for probing analysis in print journalism in the 1920s and 1930s
-None of the above.

a push for probing analysis in print
What makes literary journalism different from early-twentieth-century models of ”objective” journalism?

-Literary journalism focused on a ”just the facts” approach, cutting out the extra descriptive details found in objective journalism.
-Literary journalism applied fiction writing techniques to nonfiction material, instead of being purely informational as in objective journalism.
-Literary journalism focused only on gossip while objective journalism focused only on news.
-Literary journalism believed in reporting on both sides of an argument, whereas objective journalism focused only on one opinion.
-None of the above.

Literary journalism applied fiction writing techniques to nonfiction material, instead of being purely informational as in objective journalism.
Which of the following has been a critique of the idea of
journalistic objectivity?

-Journalists use too much flair in their stories, obscuring the important details.
-Objective journalism fuels unhealthy competition between journalists to see who can get the story first.
-It isn’t possible to have genuine journalistic impartiality, and many reporters have become too uncritical of people with power.
-It’s too difficult to tell the journalist’s thoughts apart from the thoughts of the subject of the story.
-None of the above.

it isn’t possible to have genuine journalistic impartiality, and many reporters have become too uncritical of people with power.
Besides providing community calendars and meeting notices, ______ newspapers mostly carry articles on local schools, social events, town government, property crimes, and zoning issues.

-underground
-alternative
-conflict-oriented
-postmodern
-consensus-oriented (non-controversial)

conflict-oriented
Which of the following is not true about large newspaper chains today?

-They are adding more people to their newsroom staffs.
-They are often suffering financially because of huge debt and falling income.
-They are selling off individual papers.
-They are losing talented, award-winning journalists and editors.
-All of the options are true.

They are selling off individual papers.
The business arrangement in the newspaper industry in which two separately owned papers in the same city are permitted to combine their business and production operations is called a/an
______.

-consensus operation (CO)
-multiple-system operation (MSO)
-duopoly
-joint operating agreement (JOA)
-oligopoly

Duopoly
Some print journalism observers think one piece of good news for
the industry is ______.

-newspaper sales are increasing in North America and Europe
-college graduates entering the print journalism field are looking for job openings
-small papers that focus on local news and ads retain a loyal reader base
-large corporate chains have numerous divisions to spread costs across
-All of the above.

small papers that focus on local news and ads retain a loyal reader base
Advertising revenue, the lifeblood of newspaper operations, ______.

-grew rapidly once the Internet boom took off in the late 1990s
-is holding steady even as the number of newspaper subscriptions increases
-has fallen dramatically in the past few years, with Internet ad sales unable to fill the gap
-cycles through periods of increase and decrease every few years
-None of the above.

has fallen dramatically in the last few years, with Internet ad sales unable to fill the gap
Which of the following statements about paywalls is not true?

-The Wall Street Journal pioneered one of the few successful paywalls.
-Readers who are used to free online content are shunning the idea of paywalls.
-A 2011 study found that smaller newspapers were more likely to have a paywall than larger papers.
-Newspapers don’t see any reason for paywalls—ad revenue is more than enough to cover costs.
-The New York Times added a paywall in 2011 for readers who wanted to see more than 20 articles a month.

Newspapers don’t see any reason for paywalls—ad revenue is more than enough to cover costs.
Which of the following is a way that online journalism is redefining news?

-Newspapers are making huge profits from their online versions.
-Spurred by online news, newspapers are once again rapidly expanding their news staffs.
-Newspapers can post stories online that they didn’t have room for in their print edition.
-Bloggers are taking more and more of a backseat to traditional journalism.
-None of the above.

Newspapers can post stories online that they didn’t have room for in their print edition.
Daily newspaper circulation numbers ______.

-continue to grow, but newspapers are still operating in the red
-continue to decline in places like Asia, Africa, and South America
-continue to grow in terms of actual paper subscriptions in the United States
-have declined, but these declines show some signs of being offset by increases in online readership
-All of the above.

have declined, but these declines show some signs of being offset by increases in online readership
Saving money by closing newspaper bureau offices ______.

-means a better, more detailed, and more diverse view of news events for consumers
-means fewer stories and fewer versions of stories about important issues and events
-means newspapers are hiring more reporters to staff their central news offices
-means newspapers are cutting their arts or culture sections
-None of the above.

None of the above.