Language Arts Cumulative

Read the excerpt from “A New Biographical Approach,” by Emily Toth.
[Chopin’s] first short story collection, Bayou Folk—mostly local-color stories of Cloutierville-area people—gained nationwide acclaim.
According to the excerpt, which best describes the public’s response to Chopin’s first collection?
Chopin was widely accepted by literary critics as a regional writer
According to “A New Biographical Approach,” by Emily Toth, how do Chopin’s personal experiences influence the portrayal of sensuality in her writing?
Chopin’s indulgent behavior on her honeymoon inspired female characters eager to enjoy sensual experiences.
According to “A New Biographical Approach,” by Emily Toth, how do Chopin’s personal experiences with divorce and early widowhood influence the portrayal of marriage in her writing?
NOT They prompt a renewed sense of the importance of marriage.
According to “A New Biographical Approach,” by Emily Toth, how do Chopin’s personal experiences influence the women characters in her writing?
Chopin’s experiences with the self-reliant women in her family inspired her fiercely independent women characters.
Read the excerpt of Frances Porcher’s review from The Mirror, May 1899.

It absorbs and interests, then makes one wonder, for the moment, with a little sick feeling, if all women are like the one, and that isn’t a pleasant reflection after you have taken in this character study whose “awakening” gives title to Mrs. Chopin’s novel.

What is Porcher’s response to Chopin’s writing?

Porcher criticizes Chopin’s main character.
Read the excerpt from an unsigned review in Literature, June 23, 1899.

One cannot refrain from regret that so beautiful a style and so much refinement of taste have been spent by Miss Chopin on an essentially vulgar story.

What is this reader’s response to Chopin’s writing?

The reader is critical of Chopin’s choice of themes.
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Read the excerpt of Lucy Monroe’s review from Book News, March 1899.

It is an intimate thing, which in studying the nature of one woman reveals something which brings her in touch with all women—something larger than herself. That it is which justifies the audacity of The Awakening and makes it big enough to be true. The author has shown herself an artist in the manipulation of a complex character, and faulty as the woman is, she has the magnetism which is essential to the charm of a novel.

What is Monroe’s response to Chopin’s writing?

Monroe praises the realism and universal appeal of The Awakening.
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, by Kate Chopin.
He reproached his wife with her inattention, her habitual neglect of the children. If it was not a mother’s place to look after children, whose on earth was it? He himself had his hands full with his brokerage business. He could not be in two places at once; making a living for his family on the street, and staying at home to see that no harm befell them. He talked in a monotonous, insistent way.
How does the excerpt reflect its social and historical context?
It illustrates the prevailing gender expectations within a marriage in the 1800s.
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, by Kate Chopin.
In short, Mrs. Pontellier was not a mother-woman. The mother-women seemed to prevail that summer at Grand Isle. It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood. They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels.
How does the excerpt reflect its social and historical context?
It illustrates the maternal expectations of “true womanhood” that
Read the excerpt from Kate Chopin and Her Creole Stories, by Daniel Rankin.

In The Awakening under her touch the Creole life of Louisiana glowed with a rich exotic beauty. The very atmosphere of the book is voluptuous, the atmosphere of the Gulf Coast, a place of strange and passionate moods.

What is Rankin’s response to Chopin’s writing?

Rankin is complimentary of Chopin’s regional style.
Read the excerpt from “A New Biographical Approach,” by Emily Toth.
[Chopin’s] first short story collection, Bayou Folk—mostly local-color stories of Cloutierville-area people—gained nationwide acclaim.
According to the excerpt, which best describes the public’s response to Chopin’s first collection?
Chopin was widely accepted by literary critics as a regional writer
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, by Kate Chopin.
“You are burnt beyond recognition,” he added, looking at his wife as one looks at a valuable piece of personal property which has suffered some damage. She held up her hands, strong, shapely hands, and surveyed them critically, drawing up her fawn sleeves above the wrists. Looking at them reminded her of her rings, which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach. She silently reached out to him, and he, understanding, took the rings from his vest pocket and dropped them into her open palm.
How does the excerpt reflect its social and historical context?
NOT It illustrates the “new woman” seeking possession of personal
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He walked down the gallery and across the narrow “bridges” which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other. He had been seated before the door of the main house. The parrot and the mockingbird were the property of Madame Lebrun, and they had the right to make all the noise they wished. Mr Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.

What is the correct meaning of the word “privilege” based on its usage in the excerpt?

LIBERTY
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He fixed his gaze upon a white sunshade that was advancing at snail’s pace from the beach. He could see it plainly between the gaunt trunks of the water-oaks and across the stretch of yellow camomile.

Which phrase from the excerpt gives the best evidence that “gaunt” means “thin”?

“He could see it plainly”
Read the excerpt from chapter 2 of The Awakening.

They chatted incessantly: about the things around them; their amusing adventure out in the water—it had again assumed its entertaining aspect; about the wind, the trees, the people who had gone to the Chênière; about the children playing croquet under the oaks, and the Farival twins, who were now performing the overture to “The Poet and the Peasant.”

What is the correct meaning of the word “assumed” based on its usage in the excerpt?

taken on
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He stopped before the door of his own cottage, which was the fourth one from the main building and next to the last. Seating himself in a wicker rocker which was there, he once more applied himself to the task of reading the newspaper. The day was Sunday; the paper was a day old. The Sunday papers had not yet reached Grand Isle.

Which best explains why the author chose to describe Mr. Pontellier’s cottage as “the fourth one from the main building and next to the last”?

to help the reader picture the layout of buildings in the novel’s setting
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He walked down the gallery and across the narrow “bridges” which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other. He had been seated before the door of the main house. The parrot and the mockingbird were the property of Madame Lebrun, and they had the right to make all the noise they wished. Mr Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.

Which best explains why the author describes the path Mr. Pontellier takes when he leaves the main house of Madame Lebrun?

to help the reader visualize the layout of buildings in the novel’s
Read the sentence from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

The gulf looked far away, melting hazily into the blue of the horizon.

Which best explains why the author chose to write this description of the gulf?

to help the reader visualize a view where water and sky are difficult
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He could speak a little Spanish, and also a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mocking-bird that hung on the other side of the door, whistling his fluty notes out upon the breeze with maddening persistence.
Which words from the excerpt give the best evidence that “fluty” means “high pitched”?

whistling” and “notes”
Read the sentence from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

When they reached the cottage, the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch, facing each other, each leaning against a supporting post.

Which phrase from the sentence gives the best evidence that “fatigue” means “tiredness”?

“each leaning against a supporting post”
Read the sentence from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

Mr. Pontellier, unable to read his newspaper with any degree of comfort, arose with an expression and an exclamation of disgust.

Which is the best evidence that “degree” means “measure”?

a degree is a form of temperature measurement
Read the excerpt from chapter 1 of The Awakening.

He walked down the gallery and across the narrow “bridges” which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other. He had been seated before the door of the main house. The parrot and the mockingbird were the property of Madame Lebrun, and they had the right to make all the noise they wished. Mr Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.

What is the correct meaning of the word “ceased” based on its usage in the excerpt?

stopped
Read the excerpt from The Awakening.
The very first chords which Mademoiselle Reisz struck upon the piano sent a keen tremor down Mrs. Pontellier’s spinal column. It was not the first time she had heard an artist at the piano. Perhaps it was the first time she was ready, perhaps the first time her being was tempered to take an impress of the abiding truth.
She waited for the material pictures which she thought would gather and blaze before her imagination. She waited in vain. She saw no pictures of solitude, of hope, of longing, or of despair. But the very passions themselves were aroused within her soul, swaying it, lashing it, as the waves daily beat upon her splendid body. She trembled, she was choking, and the tears blinded her.
Which statement best describes the aesthetic impact the author intends this excerpt to have upon the reader?
The author uses sensory language to appeal to the reader’s emotions.
Read each of the excerpts from The Awakening.

[Robert] never assumed this series-comic tone when alone with Mrs. Pontellier. She never knew precisely what to make of it; at that moment it was impossible for her to guess how much of it was jest and what proportion was earnest. It was understood that he had often spoken words of love to Madame Ratignolle, without any thought of being take seriously.

***

During his oblivious attention [Robert] once quietly rested his head against Mrs. Pontellier’s arm. As gently she repulsed him. Once again he repeated the offense. She could not but believe it to be thoughtlessness on his part; yet that was no reason she should submit to it. He offered no apology.

Which best explains why the author included both of these scenes in the story?

to develop a contrast between the way in which Robert interacts with Madame Ratignolle and the way he interacts with Mrs. Pontellier
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, and look at the plot diagram.

Since the age of fifteen, which was eleven years before, Robert each summer at Grand Isle had constituted himself the devoted attendant of some fair dame or damsel. Sometimes it was a young girl, again a widow, but as often as not it was some interesting married woman.

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Which best explains this excerpt’s purpose in the novel’s plot structure?

The excerpt provides background information on a character as part of the exposition.
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, and look at the diagram.

“I have a letter somewhere,” looking in the machine drawer and finding the letter in the bottom of the workbasket. “he says to tell you he will be in Vera Cruz the beginning of next month,”—”and if you still have the intention of joining him”—bang! clatter, clatter, bang!

“Why didn’t you tell me so before, mother? You know I wanted—” Clatter, clatter, clatter!

mc009-1.jpg

Which best explains this excerpt’s purpose in the novel’s plot structure?

The excerpt builds suspense as part of the rising action.
Read each of the excerpts from The Awakening.

The youngsters came tumbling up the steps, the quadroon following at the respectful distance which they required her to observe. Mrs. Pontellier made them carry her paints and things into the house. She sought to detain them for a little talk and some pleasantry. But they were greatly in earnest. They had only come to investigate the contents of the bonbon box.

***

[Mrs. Pontellier] stood watching the fair woman walk down the long line of galleries with the grace and majesty which queens are sometimes supposed to possess. Her little ones ran to meet her. Two of them clung about her white skirts, the third she took from its nurse and with a thousand endearments bore it along in her own fond, encircling arms.

Which best explains why the author included both of these scenes in the story?

to develop a contrast between the way in which Mrs. Pontellier and Madame Ratignolle carry out traditional female roles
Read the excerpt from The Awakening, and look at the plot diagram.

“Do me a favor, Robert,” spoke the pretty woman at his side, almost as soon as she and Robert had started their slow, homeward way. She looked up in his face, leaning on his arm beneath the encircling shadow of the umbrella which he had lifted.

“Granted; as many as you like,” he returned, glancing down into her eyes that were full of thoughtfulness and some speculation.

“I only ask for one; let Mrs. Pontellier alone.”
Which best explains this excerpt’s purpose in the novel’s plot structure?

The excerpt builds suspense and creates tension as part of
Read each of the excerpts from The Awakening.

[Madame Ratignolle] acceded to the suggestion of bouillon, which was grateful and acceptable. [Robert Lebrun] went himself to the kitchen, which was a building apart from the cottages and lying to the rear of the house. And he himself brought her the golden-brown bouillon, in a dainty Sèvres cup, with a flaky cracker or two on the saucer.

***

Madame Lebrun went back to the machine, crimson with annoyance. Victor was the younger son and brother—a tête montée [hot-headed], with a temper which invited violence and a will which no ax could break.

Which best explains why the author included both of these scenes in the story?

to develop a contrast between the two sons of Madame Lebrun
Read the excerpt from chapter 11 of The Awakening.

“Edna, dear, are you not coming in soon?” he asked again, this time fondly, with a note of entreaty.

“No, I am going to stay out here.”

“This is more than folly,” he blurted out. “I can’t permit you to stay out there all night. You must come in the house instantly.”

Which best explains how the excerpt is an example of realism?

The conversation imitates conversations in real life.
Read the excerpt from chapter 11 of The Awakening.

Edna arose, cramped from lying so long and still in the hammock. She tottered up the steps, clutching feebly at the post before passing into the house.

Which words and phrases from the excerpt best reflect Chopin’s connotative style?

“cramped,” “tottered,” and “clutching feebly
Read the excerpt from chapter 12 of The Awakening.
Robert knew the girl, and he talked to her a little in the boat. No one present understood what they said. Her name was Mariequita. She had a round, sly, piquant face and pretty black eyes. Her hands were small, and she kept them folded over the handle of her basket. Her feet were broad and coarse. She did not strive to hide them. Edna looked at her feet, and noticed the sand and slime between her brown toes.
Which best explains why the excerpt is an example of realism?
The ways in which characters from different social classes perceive and treat each other are addressed.
Read the excerpt from chapter 12 of The Awakening.

Sailing across the bay to the Chênière Caminada, Edna felt as if she were being borne away from some anchorage which had held her fast, whose chains had been loosening—had snapped the night before when the mystic spirit was abroad, leaving her free to drift whithersoever she chose to set her sails.
Which best explains how the excerpt is an example of naturalism?

Edna is responding to her environment, which is in control of her feelings and behaviors.
Read the excerpt from chapter 12 of The Awakening.
[Roger] had soon joined her. [Edna] had never sent for him before. She had never asked for him. She had never seemed to want him before. She did not appear conscious that she had done anything unusual in commanding his presence. He was apparently equally unconscious of anything extraordinary in the situation. But his face was suffused with a quiet glow when he met her.
Which best explains how the excerpt is an example of naturalism?
The characters are described as “not conscious” and “unconscious” with respect to the internal forces driving their actions
Read the excerpt from chapter 11 of The Awakening.

The stillest hour of the night had come, the hour before dawn, when the world seems to hold its breath. The moon hung low, and had turned from silver to copper in the sleeping sky. The old owl no longer hooted, and the water-oaks had ceased to moan as they bent their heads.

Which best describes how the author uses language to craft her style?

The author uses figurative language to create strong sensory images of nature.
Read the excerpt, spoken by Roger to Edna, from The Awakening.

“You have slept precisely one hundred years. I was left here to guard your slumbers; and for one hundred years I have been out under the shed reading a book. The only evil I couldn’t prevent was to keep a broiled fowl from drying up.”

Which best describes the underlying tone connotated by the words in the excerpt?

playful
Read the excerpt from chapter 13 of The Awakening.

[Edna] stretched her strong limbs that ached a little. She ran her fingers through her loosened hair for awhile. She looked at her round arms as she held them straight up and rubbed them one after the other, observing closely, as if it were something she saw for the first time, the fine, firm quality and texture of her flesh. She clasped her hands easily above her head, and it was thus she fell asleep.

Which best explains how Chopin’s use of language in the excerpt represents her naturalistic style?

Chopin uses language to authentically describe the actions of a
Read the sentence from chapter 11 of The Awakening.

[Edna] tottered up the steps, clutching feebly at the post before passing into the house.

Which best explains why the sentence is representative of Chopin’s style?

The words “tottered” and “clutching feebly” have strong connotative meanings.
Read the sentence from chapter 13 of The Awakening.

The shadows lengthened and crept out like stealthy, grotesque monsters across the grass.

Which best describes the underlying tone connotated by the words in this sentence?

foreboding
Read the excerpt from chapter 17 of The Awakening.

Once she stopped, and taking off her wedding ring, flung it on the carpet. When she saw it lying there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it. But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.

Which best explains how the excerpt is evidence of an emerging theme of the novel?

The action in the excerpt takes place around a wedding ring, which is traditionally a symbol of a husband’s claim on his wife.
Which prediction is most likely based on the themes that have emerged so far in The Awakening?
Edna’s internal conflict between her domestic roles and her inner desires will reach a crisis point
Which best explains how the excerpt is evidence of an emerging theme?
A wife suffers the disapproval
The excerpt describes a woman who feels disheartened
The execerpt demonstates which emerging theme
women who do not conform
Which words and phrase beset establish mood in the except
“walk to and fro”
Which best describes the mood the auther conveys
mood of frustration
Which prediction is most likely based on the themes that have emerged
Many people in Mrs
Read the excerpt from chapter 17 of The Awakening.

[Mrs. Pontellier] was somewhat familiar with such scenes. They had often made her very unhappy. On a few previous occasions she had been completely deprived of any desire to finish her dinner. Sometimes she had gone into the kitchen to administer a tardy rebuke to the cook. Once she went to her room and studied the cookbook during an entire evening, finally writing out a menu for the week, which left her harassed with a feeling that, after all, she had accomplished no good that was worth the name.

Which prediction is most likely based on the themes that have emerged so far in The Awakening?

Mrs.Pontellier will make
Read the excerpt from chapter 17 of The Awakening.

The house was painted a dazzling white; the outside shutters, or jalousies, were green. In the yard, which was kept scrupulously neat, were flowers and plants of every description which flourishes in South Louisiana. Within doors the appointments were perfect after the conventional type. The softest carpets and rugs covered the floors; rich and tasteful draperies hung at doors and windows.

Which words best establish mood in the excerpt?

“dazzling”
Read the excerpt from chapter 23 of The Awakening.

When Doctor Mandelet dined with the Pontelliers on Thursday he could discern in Mrs. Pontellier no trace of that morbid condition which her husband had reported to him. She was excited and in a manner radiant. She and her father had been to the race course, and their thoughts when they seated themselves at table were still occupied with the events of the afternoon, and their talk was still of the track.
Which statement best describes the point of view in the excerpt?

3rd person
Read the excerpt from chapter 25 of The Awakening.

She did not perceive that she was talking like her father as the sleek geldings ambled in review before them. She played for very high stakes, and fortune favored her. The fever of the game flamed in her cheeks and eyes, and it got into her blood and into her brain like an intoxicant. People turned their heads to look at her, and more than one lent an attentive ear to her utterances, hoping thereby to secure the elusive but ever-desired “tip.” Arobin caught the contagion of excitement which drew him to Edna like a magnet.
Which best describes the narrative voice in the excerpt?

The author uses an omniscient
Read the excerpt from chapter 23 of The Awakening.

Mr. Pontellier himself had no particular leaning toward horseracing, and was even rather inclined to discourage it as a pastime, especially when he considered the fate of that blue-grass farm in Kentucky. He endeavored, in a general way, to express a particular disapproval, and only succeeded in arousing the ire and opposition of his father-in-law. A pretty dispute followed, in which Edna warmly espoused her father’s cause and the Doctor remained neutral.
Which statement best describes the point of view in the excerpt?

3rd person
Read the excerpt from chapter 25 of The Awakening.

Mrs. Highcamp deplored the absence of her daughter from the races, and tried to convey to her what she had missed by going to the “Dante reading” instead of joining them. The girl held a geranium leaf up to her nose and said nothing, but looked knowing and noncommittal.
Which statement best summarizes the explicit message in the excerpt?

Mrs/Highcamp wishes
Read the excerpt from chapter 23 of The Awakening.

Mr. Pontellier did not attend these soirée musicales. He considered them bourgeois, and found more diversion at the club. To Madame Ratignolle he said the music dispensed at her soirées was too “heavy,” too far beyond his untrained comprehension. His excuse flattered her. But she disapproved of Mr. Pontellier’s club, and she was frank enough to tell Edna so.
Which statement best describes the point of view in the excerpt?

The 3rd person point of view is an omniscient observer
Read the excerpt from chapter 25 of The Awakening.

There was a perpetual smile in his eyes, which seldom failed to awaken a corresponding cheerfulness in any one who looked into them and listened to his good-humored voice. His manner was quiet, and at times a little insolent. He possessed a good figure, a pleasing face, not overburdened with depth of thought or feeling; and his dress was that of the conventional man of fashion.

Which statement best summarizes the explicit message in the excerpt?

Arobin is a social man
Read the excerpt from chapter 25 of The Awakening.

The afternoon was intensely interesting to her. The excitement came back upon her like a remittent fever. Her talk grew familiar and confidential. It was no labor to become intimate with Arobin. His manner invited easy confidence. The preliminary stage of becoming acquainted was one which he always endeavored to ignore when a pretty and engaging woman was concerned.
Which best describes the narrative voice in the excerpt?

The author uses an omniscient narrator to reveal the thoughts
Read the excerpt from chapter 25 of The Awakening.

There were possibly a few track men out there who knew the race horse as well as Edna, but there was certainly none who knew it better. She sat between her two companions as one having authority to speak. She laughed at Arobin’s pretensions, and deplored Mrs. Highcamp’s ignorance.
Which statement best summarizes the explicit message in the excerpt?

Edna’s knowledge of the track is legitimate.
Read the excerpt from chapter 23 of The Awakening.

The Doctor had not kept pace with turf affairs. He had certain recollections of racing in what he called “the good old times” when the Lecompte stables flourished, and he drew upon this fund of memories so that he might not be left out and seem wholly devoid of the modern spirit. But he failed to impose upon the Colonel, and was even far from impressing him with this trumped-up knowledge of bygone days. Edna had staked her father on his last venture, with the most gratifying results to both of them.
Why did the author most likely choose an omniscient narrator?

to reveal the thoughts and motivations of multiple character
Read the excerpt from chapter 32 of The Awakening.

When Mr. Pontellier learned of his wife’s intention to abandon her home and take up her residence elsewhere, he immediately wrote her a letter of unqualified disapproval and remonstrance. She had given reasons which he was unwilling to acknowledge as adequate. He hoped she had not acted upon her rash impulse; and he begged her to consider first, foremost, and above all else, what people would say.
What does Mr. Pontellier’s letter reveal about his personality?

he is very
Read the excerpt from chapter 34 of The Awakening.

“Fine fellow, that Lebrun,” said Arobin when Robert had gone. “I never heard you speak of him.”
“I knew him last summer at Grand Isle,” she replied.
What becomes apparent during this conversation?

arobin
Read the excerpt from chapter 31 of The Awakening.

“Will you have a spray of jessamine?” he asked, breaking off a few blossoms as he passed.
“No; I don’t want anything.”
She seemed disheartened, and had nothing to say. She took his arm, which he offered her, holding up the weight of her satin train with the other hand. She looked down, noticing the black line of his leg moving in and out so close to her against the yellow shimmer of her gown. There was the whistle of a railway train somewhere in the distance, and the midnight bells were ringing. They met no one in their short walk.
What does Edna’s rejection of the jessamine reveal to the reader?

that she is losing interest
Read the excerpt from chapter 30 of The Awakening.

The golden shimmer of Edna’s satin gown spread in rich folds on either side of her. There was a soft fall of lace encircling her shoulders. It was the color of her skin, without the glow, the myriad living tints that one may sometimes discover in vibrant flesh. There was something in her attitude, in her whole appearance when she leaned her head against the high-backed chair and spread her arms, which suggested the regal woman, the one who rules, who looks on, who stands alone.
What does this excerpt reveal about Edna’s character?

Ednas plays the role of the
Which excerpt from The Awakening best reveals that Mr. Pontellier has no awareness of his wife’s true thoughts or activities?
He was not dreaming of scandal when he uttered this warning; that was a thing which would never have entered into his mind to consider in connection with his wife’s name or his own.
Read the excerpt from chapter 33 of The Awakening.

“Does he boast of his successes?” asked Edna, indifferently, squinting at her picture.
Edna’s casual response to Madame Ratignolle’s concerns reveals that

she is a lot less concerned with public opinion than Madame
Read the excerpt from chapter 33 of The Awakening.

Then in the afternoon Mrs. Merriman and Mrs. Highcamp had made their “party call.” Edna felt that they might have dispensed with the formality. They had also come to invite her to play vingt-et-un one evening at Mrs. Merriman’s. She was asked to go early, to dinner, and Mr. Merriman or Mr. Arobin would take her home. Edna accepted in a half-hearted way. She sometimes felt very tired of Mrs. Highcamp and Mrs. Merriman.
Edna’s weariness of Mrs. Merriman and Mrs. Highcamp is a reflection

disillusionment with conventional society.
In chapter 31 of The Awakening, which incident best indicates that Arobin’s feelings for Edna are much deeper than her feelings for him?
Rather than thanking Arobin for his gift, she appears
Read the excerpt from chapter 31 of The Awakening.

He looked around, and began to turn out some of the lights.
“What about upstairs?” he inquired.
“I think it is all right; but there may be a window or two unlatched. We had better look; you might take a candle and see. And bring me my wrap and hat on the foot of the bed in the middle room.”
He went up with the light, and Edna began closing doors and windows. She hated to shut in the smoke and the fumes of the wine. Arobin found her cape and hat, which he brought down and helped her to put on.
What does this excerpt reveal about the role Arobin has taken in Edna’s life?

In Leonce’s absence, Arobin has become Edna’s substitute husband.
Read the excerpt from chapter 37 of The Awakening.

She was still stunned and speechless with emotion when later she leaned over her friend to kiss her and softly say good-by. Adèle, pressing her cheek, whispered in an exhausted voice: “Think of the children, Edna. Oh think of the children! Remember them!”
Which of the following ideas are Adèle’s words reflecting?

Children are supremely important
Which excerpt from chapter 38 of The Awakening best supports the idea that Edna has suffered as a result of her revelations
“[O]h! well! perhaps it is better to wake up after
Read the excerpt from chapter 36 of The Awakening.

“I am destined to see you only by accident,” she said, shoving the cat off the chair beside her. He was surprised, ill at ease, almost embarrassed at meeting her thus so unexpectedly.
Which of the following ideas do Edna’s accidental meetings with Robert

Love renders a person powerless and subject to chance.
Which excerpt from The Awakening best illustrates the idea that self-determination
There was no human being whom she wanted near her except Robert; and she even realized that the day would come when he, too, and the thought of him would melt out of
Read the excerpt from chapter 39 of The Awakening.

The children appeared before her like antagonists who had overcome her; who had overpowered and sought to drag her into the soul’s slavery for the rest of her days. But she knew a way to elude them.

Which of Edna’s ideas about motherhood does the excerpt convey?

that motherhood is a burden
Read the excerpt from chapter 35 of The Awakening.

A letter also came from her husband, saying he hoped to be back early in March, and then they would get ready for that journey abroad which he had promised her so long, which he felt now fully able to afford; he felt able to travel as people should, without any thought of small economies—thanks to his recent speculations in Wall Street.
What theme is expressed in the letter from Edna’s husband?

Happiness can be gained from financial fortune.
Read the excerpt from chapter 38 of The Awakening.

“Perhaps—no, I am not going. I’m not going to be forced into doing things. I don’t want to go abroad. I want to be let alone.”

Which realization is Edna beginning to have

Independence leads to great solitude.
Read the excerpt from chapter 38 of The Awakening.

Robert was not waiting for her in the little parlor. He was nowhere at hand. The house was empty. But he had scrawled on a piece of paper that lay in the lamplight:
“I love you. Good-by—because I love you.”
What significant idea, presented throughout the novel, does Robert’s

Edna is ultimately alone in her rebirth
Read the excerpt from chapter 37 of The Awakening.

Edna began to feel uneasy. She was seized with a vague dread. Her own like experiences seemed far away, unreal, and only half remembered. She recalled faintly an ecstasy of pain, the heavy odor of chloroform, a stupor which had deadened sensation, and an awakening to find a little new life to which she had given being, added to the great unnumbered multitude of souls that come and go.
Which idea is related to the reader through Edna’s revelation about her childbirth

Her experiences of motherhood are also fading from consciousness
Read the poem “The Garret,” by Ezra Pound.

COME let us pity those who are better off than we are.
Come, my friend, and remember
that the rich have butlers and no friends,
And we have friends and no butlers.
Come let us pity the married and the unmarried.

Dawn enters with little feet
like a gilded Pavlova,
And I am near my desire.
Nor has life in it aught better
Than this hour of clear coolness,
the hour of waking together.

Which best describes the modernist theme reflected in the poem?

the isolation of individuals
Read the poem “The Garret,” by Ezra Pound.

COME let us pity those who are better off than we are.
Come, my friend, and remember
that the rich have butlers and no friends,
And we have friends and no butlers.
Come let us pity the married and the unmarried.

Dawn enters with little feet
like a gilded Pavlova,
And I am near my desire.
Nor has life in it aught better
Than this hour of clear coolness,
the hour of waking together.

Which is a modernist technique used in the poem?

clear and direct language
Read “In a Station of the Metro,” by Ezra Pound.

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
Petals on a wet, black bough.

In this poem, Pound is comparing “faces in the crowd” to petals that

laying against a tree branch
Read the poem “Sea Rose,” by H.D.

Rose, harsh rose,
marred and with stint of petals,
meagre flower, thin,
sparse of leaf,

more precious
than a wet rose
single on a stem? —
you are caught in the drift.

Stunted, with small leaf,
you are flung on the sand,
you are lifted
in the crisp sand
that drives in the wind.

Can the spice-rose
drip such acrid fragrance
hardened in a leaf?

What is the central image of the poem?

a rose exposed
Read the excerpt from “Make it New”: Early Modernism.

Ezra Pound challenged other poets to “Make it new.”

Which answer choice best describes Ezra Pound’s intent in this statement

poets should
Which best describes the structure of “Sea Rose”?
free verse
According to “Make it New”: Early Modernism, which work by T.S. Eliot was the basis of a popular Broadway musical?
Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats
Read the stanza from “The Garret,” by Ezra Pound.

Dawn enters with little feet
like a gilded Pavlova,
And I am near my desire.
Nor has life in it aught better
Than this hour of clear coolness,
the hour of waking together.

The imagery in these lines suggest that

daylight comes slowly and delicately into the room.
Read the excerpt from “Mending Wall.”

Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
“Why do they make good neighbours? Isn’t it
Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That wants it down.”

Now read “The Pasture,” also by Robert Frost.

I’m going out to clean the pasture spring;
I’ll only stop to rake the leaves away
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):
I shan’t be gone long.—You come too.

I’m going out to fetch the little calf
That’s standing by the mother. It’s so young,
It totters when she licks it with her tongue.
I shan’t be gone long.—You come too.

Which best accounts for the different views of spring expressed in the poems?

The poems have different speakers.
Read the poem “The Purple Cow,” by Gelett Burgess.

The Purple Cow
(Reflections on a Mythic Beast Who’s Quite Remarkable, at Least.)

I never saw a Purple Cow;
I never hope to See One;
But I can Tell you, Anyhow,
I’d rather See than Be One.

What is the main similarity between “The Purple Cow” and Frost’s poem “Mending Wall”?

both use humerous lang
Read the excerpt from “Mending Wall.”

I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father’s saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, “Good fences make good neighbours.”

Based on the excerpt, what does the speaker think of his neighbor?

he is stubburn
Who is the speaker of “Mending Wall”
the apple orchard
Read the poem “The Purple Cow,” by Gelett Burgess.

The Purple Cow
(Reflections on a Mythic Beast Who’s Quite Remarkable, at Least.)

I never saw a Purple Cow;
I never hope to See One;
But I can Tell you, Anyhow,
I’d rather See than Be One.

What is the main difference between “The Purple Cow” and Frost’s poem “Mending Wall”?

the use of ryming in the purple cow
Read the excerpt from “To a Shade,” by William Butler Yeats.

If you have revisited the town, thin Shade,
Whether to look upon your monument
(I wonder if the builder has been paid)
Or happier-thoughted when the day is spent
To drink of that salt breath out of the sea
When grey gulls flit about instead of men,
And the gaunt houses put on majesty:
Let these content you and be gone again;
For they are at their old tricks yet.

This excerpt is an example of

iambic pentameterq
Why does the neighborhood say that “good fences make good neighborhoods” in mending wall
He is repeating what his father
Which practice was common among modernist poets?
using experimental techniques
Read the excerpt from “Mending Wall.”

I let my neighbour know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
“Stay where you are until our backs are turned!”
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.

What does the phrase “one on a side” mean?

the speaker and the neighbor repair
Based on evidence of his personality in “Civil Disobedience,” what effect would a longer jail stay most likely have had on Thoreau?
it would have hardened his
Considering “Civil Disobedience,” which best describes how Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. both felt about acts of civil disobedience?
they bother believed that indiciduals
In “Civil Disobedience,” what is Thoreau’s view of the state at the end of the essay?
he feels sorry for the
Which best describes one way in which “Civil Disobedience” impacted people and events later in history?
It fortified the beliefs of those who thought the government acted unfairly.
Considering “Civil Disobedience,” why did both Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. engage in acts of civil disobedience?
to protest government policies they believed were unjust
What is Thoreau’s first thought upon being imprisoned in “Civil Disobedience”?
he considers the
Based on “Civil Disobedience,” what statement did Thoreau, like his modern-day successors, hope to make with his imprisonment?
he wanted to suggest the one
In “Civil Disobedience,” what does Thoreau think about right after he wonders if he could have been of service to his community?
the significance of
Read the quotation from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Self-Reliance.”

These are the voices which we hear in solitude, but they grow faint and inaudible as we enter into the world. Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members.

Which tenant of transcendentalism does this quotation best illustrate?

Society and government corrupt the individual.
The word most nearly opposite in meaning to stringency is ____.
leniency
My Bondage and My Freedom reveals that in the lifetime of Frederick Douglass, in the South, slaves and women were both
subject to white male authority
What might you have learned had this account been written by Master Hugh?
why master hugh
What does Douglass mean by saying “Conscience cannot stand much violence”?
compromise one
Douglass believes that Mrs. Auld was not suited to be a slaveholder because she lacked the necessary ____.
cruely
What is the most important message of My Bondage and My Freedom?
slavery
What additional information would be most appropriate to Douglass’s autobiography?
a description
Which of the following statements best expresses Douglass’s attitude toward slavery?
slavery goes
In what way are Douglass’s efforts to educate himself paradoxical?
the more
Based on Chief Joseph’s message in “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs,” the Nez Percé people most likely value
peace, tradtion
How would the meaning of “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs” most likely have been affected had Chief Joseph adopted a tone of resentment instead?
it would appear as an
Read the quotation from “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs.”

What I have to say will come from my heart, and I will speak with a straight tongue.
Based on this quotation, the reader can conclude that the Nez Percé people most believe in

the importance of speaking
Read the excerpt from “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs.”

My friends, I have been asked to show you my heart. I am glad to have a chance to do so. I want the white people to understand my people.

Based on the tone of this excerpt, the author most likely wants the audience to

listen with compassion
In “My Heart Is Bursting,” which tactic does Santana use to convey the central idea that the Kiowa people intend to remain on their own land?
Santana direcrly states
In “My Heart Is Bursting,” which quote most contributes to the central idea that the Kiowa tribe wishes to maintain their lifestyle and traditions
I don’t want
Read the quote from “My Heart Is Bursting.”

If I had been fighting I would have done it by day and not in the dark.

The tone of this sentence can best be described as conveying

pride
Read the excerpt from “An Indian’s View of Indian Affairs.”

We were taught to believe that the Great Spirit sees and hears everything, and that he never forgets; that hereafter he will give every man a spirit-home according to his deserts: if he has been a good man, he will have a good home; if he has been a bad man, he will have a bad home.
What central idea of the speech is illustrated by this excerpt?

the way a man
Read the excerpt from “My Heart Is Bursting.”

You, the commissioners, have come from afar to listen to our grievances. My heart is glad and I shall hide nothing from you. I understood that you were coming down to see us. I moved away from those disposed for war, and I also came along to see you.

How does Santana’s humble tone affect the meaning of his speech

it assures those who are listening that Santana
Read the excerpt from the final paragraph of “Wilson’s War Message to Congress.”

But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts—for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments. . .

The most likely purpose of including this in the last paragraph is to

establish
Read the paragraph from “How We Entered World War I.”

As ships piled up in home ports, American commerce threatened to come to a standstill affecting the entire national economy. The Cabinet grew seriously alarmed. Although Wilson possessed the executive authority to arm ships, he was reluctant to take the step that would inevitably start the shooting. He preferred to ask Congress for authorization, thus touching off the great debate and filibuster on the Armed Ship Bill.

How does the author organize the text to support her viewpoint in the paragraph?

she details
How does President Wilson organize paragraph 8, which begins “It is a distressing and oppressive duty,” of “Wilson’s War Message to Congress”?
he states
How does the text structure of “Wilson’s War Message to Congress” help to support his message?
Wilson presents
What is the best summary of the first paragraph of “How We Entered World War I”?
the United states was not
What does the repetition of the word “neutral” throughout “How We Entered World War I” emphasize?
the stance
Read the paragraph from “Wilson’s War Message to Congress.”

Neutrality is no longer feasible or desirable where the peace of the world is involved and the freedom of its peoples, and the menace to that peace and freedom lies in the existence of autocratic governments backed by organized force which is controlled wholly by their will, not by the will of their people. We have seen the last of neutrality in such circumstances.

Which statement best describes the main idea of the paragraph?

Our country
What key detail in “Wilson’s War Message to Congress” supports his argument for entering the war?
Germany has
Read the paragraph from “Wilson’s War Message to Congress.”

Gentlemen of the Congress: I have called the Congress into extraordinary session because there are serious, very serious, choices of policy to be made, and made immediately, which it was neither right nor constitutionally permissible that I should assume the responsibility of making.

Wilson’s word choice in the paragraph supports the idea that

he understands
Read the paragraph from “Wilson’s War Message to Congress.”

We have no quarrel with the German people. We have no feeling towards them but one of sympathy and friendship. It was not upon their impulse that their Government acted in entering this war. It was not with their previous knowledge or approval. It was a war determined upon as wars used to be determined upon in the old, unhappy days when peoples were nowhere consulted by their rulers and wars were provoked and waged in the interest of dynasties or of little groups of ambitious men who were accustomed to use their fellow men as pawns and tools.

main idea and details
Which statement best describes the main idea of paragraph 5, which begins “For Wilson,” in “How We Entered World War I”?
The economy