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Irish Restaurant Concept

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Beverage Management Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Table of Contents: Introduction3 * Concept Development3 * Restaurant Concept3 * Vision, Mission, and Goal4 * Target market4 * Location and Demand Analysis5 * Degree of Competition6 The Restaurant8 * Food and Beverage Selections8 * Theme and Decorations9 * Point of Differentiation9 * SWOT Analysis10 Team Members12 Restaurant Menu13 HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedures33 * Personal Hygiene33 * Receiving and Storing34 * Preparing and Cooking36 * Serving38 Exhibit39 References46 Introduction:

The entire restaurant concept of this project has evolved from the idea of Traditional Irish Food. In general, Ireland is located in Western Europe and the capital city is Dublin. The country is surrounded by sea, making seafood relatively common in the Irish cooking. Well-known Irish food usually includes of Irish stew, bacons, and potatoes (Food & Drink in Ireland, 2009). Furthermore, the Shamrock symbol, Guinness beer and St. Patrick’s Day are what people can recall when talking about Ireland. Concept Development: Restaurant Concept: Casual dining restaurant

Concept Name: The Restaurant name is Clonalis, la maison d’Irlande or Clonalis, the Irish House.

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The Clonalis House (Exhibit 1) is actually a one of the Ireland’s tourist attractions because it is an ancestral estate, which encompasses a long heritage. The House is located in the suburb of Castlerea. The property was owned by the O’Conors, the direct descendants of Irish Connacht’s dynasty in the 12th Century, since 1878 for more than 1500 years. The House was the first mass concrete house built in Ireland and was associated very much with the Irish politics.

Today the House serves the dual purpose of being one of the most important tourist attractions in Ireland and an accommodation for visitors. Nonetheless, the unique heritage and history of the Clonalis still remains. It is a major repository of correspondence, heirlooms, 600 year-old portraits of the O’Conors, and 7,000 volumes of historical literatures. Influenced by Italian style, the architecture allows light to come in that creates bright and warm family atmosphere (Clonalis House).

Inspired by the Clonalis House, the Restaurant ambience will communicate family atmosphere by blending both traditional and contemporary designs to offer warming and relaxing tone. Further details of the Restaurant will be explained later in this report. Vision, Mission, and Goal: Vision Statement: To be the destination Irish restaurant in Geneva and to obtain a place in customer’s mind when it comes to quality food and relaxation. Mission Statement: Deliver excellent customer service and bring about ustomer satisfaction by providing quality traditional Irish food and warming and inviting atmosphere with a blend of tradition and contemporary vibe where customers can just sit, relax and enjoy the best of what Ireland has to offer.

Goal: Establish strong brand position and obtain loyal customers to help the Restaurant breakeven within the first 6 months. Target Market: The Restaurant targets both male and female customers either local or tourists who are 30 to 55 of age with an annual income between CHF 60,000 and CHF 120,000. The primary target ranges within 5 km. adius; the secondary ranges within 20 km. and; the tertiary ranges more than 20 km. radius. Location and Demand Analysis: The Restaurant will be located on Place du Molard, Geneva. Why Geneva? Geneva is known for its richness and complexity of culture and people. According to Geneva Economic Development Office, more than 40% of Genevans are immigrants from somewhere else. Number of multinational companies as well as 24 international organizations, 200 diplomatic consulates, and 300 international NGOs are based in the city. This makes it a center of businesses, meetings, and conventions.

Moreover, the city is very compact and the transportation makes it very easy to travel around. Because of its diverse environment, Geneva is the most ideal place to open an international food restaurant such as Irish restaurant. Moreover, it is easier to operate an Irish restaurant in Geneva than other cities in Switzerland. Employees in the city are also used to working with people from distinct backgrounds. Another benefit is that people in Geneva tend to equally accept other national customs as the local’s. It will be less difficult to promote international food in such city than those which are hardly exposed to multi-cultures.

In fact, more than 1,200 cuisines are from all over the world (Republic and State of Geneva: Department of Economy and Health, 2009). Not only does Geneva have high potential demand due to its high traffic, but also it consists of many groups of people whom the Restaurant can penetrate. The demand of the Restaurant can be categorized into two groups, the locals and the tourists. To clarify each group, the locals are people who reside in Switzerland and the tourists are those who travel from other countries. Among the locals are many Irish people.

Number of Irish associations, for instance the Geneva Irish Association and the Irish Folk, indicates that there are specific or direct groups of demand for the Restaurant. According to the Embassy of Ireland, 4,000 Irish citizens reside in Switzerland in 2008 and the number seems to be increasing annually (Flights of the Earls, 2009). Beside the locals are the tourists. More than 1. 3 million tourists visit Geneva in 2008 (Exhibit 2) (Geneva Tourism, 2009). Among these are business delegates who came to attend international conferences, which are held throughout each year.

The monthly average tourist arrivals in Geneva are shown in Exhibit 3. Based on the information collected, it is anticipated that the average demand of the Restaurant composes of 40% locals and 60% tourists. Why Place du Molard? Place du Molard is located between Rue du Rhone and Rue du Marche (Exhibit 4), which are the famous shopping streets in Geneva. Rue du Rhone is full of exclusive shops and brand names that target high-income customers such as Catier, Patek Philippe, Bulgari, and Louise Vuitton just to name a few.

On the other end of Place du Molard is Rue du Marche, which is a traffic-free shopping street full of fashion, electronics, and several department stores (Geneva Destination Guide). These streets are one of the attractions of the city. People come here to relax, socialize, and spend money! Thereby locating the Restaurant between these streets will attract the demand from both sides, which match the demographic of the Restaurant’s target market. Besides those shopping streets are Cathedral St. Pierre, Jet D’eau, the Flower Clock, and Mesee International de la Reforme.

These tourist attractions definitely are beneficial to the Restaurant location because they draw more potential customers. Degree of Competition: To analyze the degree of competition of the location, Porter’s 5 Forces framework (Porter’s 5 Forces, 2007) is applied. The framework takes into consideration of five basic factors of the business: threat of substitutes, barrier to entry, buyer power, supplier power, and degree of rivalry (Exhibit 5). Threat of substitutes: Substitutes of the Restaurant are those that take away the Restaurant’s share of the customers’ pocket.

Based on Exhibit 4, there are many other substitutes ranging from takeaways to fine dining restaurants that customers can choose from. These substitutes are both direct and indirect competitors that are represented by green dots. Moreover, as indicated in Exhibit 6, the two direct competitors are Spring Brother and Flanagan’s Irish Pubs. Both of them locate about 500 meters away from Place du Molard. However, they are pubs whereas the Clonalis, la maison d’Irlande is more like a casual dining restaurant. Therefore, based on this information, the threat of substitutes for the Restaurant is high.

Nonetheless, looking at it from another point of view, it can be argued that when restaurants concentrate within the same area, it usually creates a pull of demand. Also, since there are already two Irish pubs in the area, it implies that there is demand for Irish food. Barrier of entry: This is to analyze how easy it is to open a restaurant in the area. It seems that the location is already full of restaurants and shops. Also there are other requirements such as cost of capital and regulations that need to be fulfilled to open a restaurant. However, it does not mean that it is not possible to open one.

Therefore, the barrier to entry is moderate. Buyer power: The buyer power is the impact that customers have on the Restaurant. Again, there are many substitutes that customers can choose from around the area. However, at the same time, the Restaurant is dependent on wide range of customers, not only specific ones. Therefore, buyer power in this case tends to be moderate. Supplier power: Suppliers are those whom the Restaurant buys its supplies in order to operate the business. These may include equipments, decorations, and ingredient suppliers. The supplier power is low because the Restaurant can choose its suppliers for many sources.

Degree of rivalry: Taking all the factors together, it seems like the degree of rivalry is moderate. Opening a restaurant in the specific location is not easy because it will need to compete with all the existing others; but on the other hand, it is possible to start up one. To survive in the market, the Restaurant needs to differentiate themselves from the others. These differentiations include the food; service style, atmosphere, and experience that the Restaurant offers to create values, which will be perceived by the customers. The Restaurant Food and Beverage Selections:

Starters, main courses, and deserts are offered in the Clonalis, la maison d’Irlande. To reflect Ireland’s geographic, surrounded by the sea, the Restaurant’s menus compose a variety of seafood dishes such as crab, salmon, shrimp, oyster and mussels. Alternatively, the Restaurant will also offer lamb, beef and vegetarian dishes, which are well-known selections from Ireland. Besides the starters and main dishes are delicious Irish desserts to finish off their meals. To complete their courses, customers can choose to have wine, soft drinks, or hot beverages (Exhibit 7) that are carefully selected to match the dishes.

Six white wines, three red wines and two Rose wines are well-paired with seafood and other dishes in the menu (Exhibit 8). Moreover, the Restaurant will as well make available for seasonal menus for winter (December to February), spring (March to May), and summer (June to August) (The Swiss Association for Quality and Management Systems, 2009). These dynamic menus are selected to match with seasonal temperatures and ingredients. They also create more varieties for the customers; for instance, the customers can have Beef and Cabbage Rolls in springtime and Iced Red Fruits Hot White Chocolate Sauce for summer desert.

The overall menu prices range from CHF 6. 00 to CHF 25. 00. Theme and Decorations: The overall Restaurant theme would be a mixture of traditional and contemporary designs while maintaining the sense of the Irish culture. As suggested by its name, the Irish Clonalis House will inspire the Restaurant design. The interior and exterior of the Restaurant will be decorated with warm pastel tones of green and yellow to give the sense of Irish sophistication and relaxation. The high ceiling and big windows will capture available light to aerate and brighten up the room.

A medium-sized chandelier is hung in the middle of the room to moderately generate traditional and elegant ambience. Long curtains with pattern of lemon yellow and green of the Irish Elf flowers will make the atmosphere livelier. The wall will be decorated with oil canvases of the Clonalis House and its views, watercolor of Irish countryside, and replica portraits of the O’Conors, the property’s original owner, to blend the atmosphere with the history of the Clonalis House. In addition, shelves of books will be installed on one section of the wall to mimic the library in the Clonalis House.

In addition, rattan tables and chairs with tables will be used to maintain wooden texture as the traditional Irish and at the same time soften the overall texture. Cushions and pillows will be placed on the chairs to make the atmosphere looks cozy. Also, every table will be embellished with soft-tone flowers to add colors, freshness and refreshing scent to the tables. Moreover, decorating plants will be added to modernize the overall atmosphere. (A reference picture is in Exhibit 9, which is similar to the Restaurant theme and decorations. Waiters and waitresses will be dressed in pastel light tuxedo-vest uniforms as to create a more sophisticated look (Exhibit 10). Point of Differentiation: Generally, traditional Irish restaurant settings are pub or bar with dark feature wooden furniture and dim or enclosed atmosphere. These Irish pubs usually concentrate on alcohol beverages and offer limited service level. As opposed to other existing Irish pubs in Geneva, the Clonalis, la maison d’Irlande offers customers a relaxing and warming atmosphere while enjoying quality traditional Irish food and elegant elements.

Customers can expect a relatively high level of service at the Restaurant. All staff is trained to provide superior service in a friendly and professional manner. In addition, all traditional menus will be carefully decorated and served in white clean dishes. All of these will enhance the overall experience and impression that the customers will receive when dining at the Restaurant. In other words, the Restaurant is primarily selling relaxing and enjoyable experience SWOT Analysis: Strengths: * The Restaurant is situated in a very good location in Geneva, Place du Molard.

Thereby, the Restaurant is having a relatively high possibility to attract potential customers in this crowded area. * Focuses on providing Irish food with a different restaurant’s style, design and atmosphere. None of the existing Irish Pubs and Restaurants nearby does the same concept. * Offers relatively high service level that will meet or exceed customers’ expectation. * High quality of food and beverages. * The food price ranging from CHF 6. 00 to CHF 25. 00 appears to be of value in terms of food quality and services that customers can expect to receive from the Restaurant. Weaknesses: New to the market therefore, it requires a certain period of time to gain customers’ awareness and the Restaurant’s reputation. * Lack of restaurant experience in the Geneva’s market. It takes time for the Restaurant to learn about operating business in the location in order to survive. * High set-up costs. Vulnerable in terms of cash flows. * Need to work extremely hard in order to achieve the 6 months breakeven goal. * Since the Restaurant provides many seafood dishes, it might be difficult to keep the food costs low because seafood costs in Switzerland is considered to be high. Opportunities: Develop a new range of Irish food for seasonal menus to avoid customers’ boredom seeing the same old menus all the time. * If the Restaurant’s concept is proved to be successful, the Restaurant can consider imitating the business conduct to other big cities such as Bern or Lausanne in Switzerland. Threats: * If the competitors move towards new and better Unique Selling Points or concepts, it is possible that they will take the customers away from the Restaurant. * Economic recession may reduce customers’ spending on food in the Restaurant. * Possibly, higher taxes imposed by the government on Restaurant businesses.

This will decrease in the overall performance in net profit/loss. Team Members: Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Project Part II III (Circle as required) I (one)| II (two)| III (three)| submission date:| submission date:| submission date:| 30 October 2009| | | Our Team consists of: Responsibility:| General Manager| Name:| Onoue| First Name:| Hiroko| Class| PGDHM| Email address:| [email protected] ch| Responsibility:| Head Chef| Name:| Tran| First Name:| Thi Thao Nhi| Class| PGDOM2| Email address:| [email protected] ch| Responsibility:| Assistant Chef| Name:| Liang Ju| First Name:| Lin| Class| PGDEM|

Email address:| [email protected] ch| Responsibility:| Restaurant Manager| Name:| Vanasin| First Name:| Samika| Class| PGDOM1| Email address:| [email protected] ch | Responsibility:| Assistant Restaurant Manager| Name:| Tatiyapornsuk| First Name:| Jiraporn| Class| PGDHM| Email address:| [email protected] ch | Restaurant Menu: Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Tian of Fresh Local Crab Meat and Wild Smoked Salmon Starter ¦ Cold Starter ¦ Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost (CHF)| Smoked salmon| Kg| 0. 00| 35%| (0. 500/65)x100| 0. 769| 32. 000| 24. 608| Coriander| Kg| 0. 040| 20%| (0. 040/80)x100| 0. 050| 17. 500| 0. 875| Crab meat| Kg| 0. 800| -| -| 0. 800| 21. 500| 17. 200| Potato (diced)| Kg| 0. 200| 25%| (0. 200/75)x100| 0. 267| 2. 400| 0. 641| Mayonnaise| Kg| 0. 100| -| -| 0. 100| 3. 700| 0. 370| Plain yoghurt| Kg| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 1. 200| 0. 072| | | | | | | Total| 43. 766| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 13. 30| Method: 1. Mix the fresh crab meat with the coriander, half of yoghurt ;amp; mayonnaise. 2. Dress the baby potato with the other half of mayonnaise ;amp; the yoghurt ;amp; scallion. 3.

Take a ring and set 1 spoon of potato salad topped with the smoked salmon and then the fresh crab meat. 4. Use some baby rocket leaves and vegetable vinaigrette around the Tian. | Standard:| (Farineau, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Angels on Horseback Starter ¦ Cold Starter ¦ Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost (CHF)| Oysters in shells| Kg| 1. 000| -| -| 1. 000| 52. 000| 52. 000| Smoked bacon| Kg| 0. 500| 20%| (0. 5/80)x100| 0. 625| 4. 900| 3. 060| Lemon juice| Ltr| 0. 200| -| -| 0. 200| 24. 000| 4. 00| Ground pepper| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| | | | | | | Total| 59. 860| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 18. 10| Method: 1. Shuck oysters by inserting the blade of a blunt ended knife between the shells and working it in until you cut the muscle that holds the shells together. 2. Catch the oyster liquid in a bowl and discard shells. 3. Strain the oyster liquid and put it into a pan along with the oysters. 4. Bring to a boil over gentle heat; simmer very gently for two minutes, then drain. 5. Trim bacon and stretch the slices by pressing with the back of a spoon Sprinkle oysters with a little lemon juice and pepper. . Roll each oyster up in a bacon slice and thread them onto skewers. 7. Broil until the bacon is crisp and sizzling, turning half way through so both sides are cooked. 8. Push off skewers and serve with cocktail picks. | Standard:| (Campbell, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Cream of Broccoli Soup Irish-Style Starter ¦ Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ¦ Main Course ? Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Chicken broth| Kg| 0. 575| -| -| 0. 575| 28. 500| 16. 388| Onion| Kg| 0. 002| 20%| (0. 002/80)x100| 0. 003| 4. 800| 0. 14| Broccoli| Kg| 0. 500| 30%| (0. 500/70)x100| 0. 714| 4. 900| 3. 499| Thyme| Kg| 0. 005| -| -| 0. 005| 16. 750| 0. 084| Garlic| Kg| 0. 002| 5%| (0. 002/95)x100| 0. 002| 5. 500| 0. 011| Butter| Kg| 0. 020| -| -| 0. 020| 9. 700| 0. 194| Salt| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Pepper| Kg| 0. 002| 15%| (0. 002/85)x100| 0. 002| 32. 750| 0. 066| | | | | | | Total| 20. 256| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 6. 10| Method: 1. Combine chicken broth, onions, broccoli, thyme, bay leaf and garlic cloves. 2. Bring to a boil. Simmer, partially covered, for 10 minutes in a small saucepan, melt butter. Stir in flour, salt and pepper.

Add milk gradually, stirring constantly until all milk is added; mixture will be lumpy at first, but will smooth out as you keep stirring. Cook, stirring occasionally, till mixture bubbles and thickens. 3. Remove and discard bay leaf from broccoli/broth mixture. Puree the soup, in batches, in blender or food processor for 30 seconds, or until very smooth. 4. Transfer to large bowl. Add milk mixture, stirring until well combined. Adjust seasoning. 5. Serve hot. | Standard:| (Dowd, Cream of Broccoli Soup, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Malted Whiskey Pate Starter ¦ Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ¦ Main Course ?

Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Butter| Kg| 0. 520| -| -| 0. 520| 9. 700| 5. 044| Onion| Kg| 0. 300| 10%| (0. 300/90)x100| 0. 333| 4. 800| 1. 598| Garlic| Kg| 0. 100| 5%| (0. 100/95)x100| 0. 105| 5. 500| 0. 577| Chicken livers| Kg| 0. 700| -| -| 0. 700| 6. 000| 4. 200| Heavy cream| Ltr| 0. 420| -| -| 0. 420| 8. 980| 3. 771| Tomato| Ltr| 0. 360| 5%| (0. 03/95)x100| 0. 360| 2. 900| 1. 044| Irish Whiskey| Ltr| 0. 445| -| -| 0. 445| 24. 950| 11. 102| Parsley| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Salt and freshly ground pepper| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| | | | | | Total| 27. 336| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 8. 30| Method: 1. Saute onions (finely chopped) and garlic (peeled and crushed) in melted butter without browning until soft and transparent. 2. Add chicken livers (well trimmed) and cook for 5 to 7 minutes. 3. Canters should still be pink. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients. Put in blender and process until smooth. 4. Turn into a small mold or bowl. 5. Sprinkle with chopped parsley. 6. Serve with water biscuit, toast or crackers. | Standard:| (Johnson. , 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Patrick’s Irish Lamb Soup Starter ¦ Cold Starter ?

Warm Starter ¦ Main Course ? Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Lamb (leg/shoulder)| Kg| 1. 000| -| -| 1. 000| 33. 800| 33. 800| Olive oil| Ltr| 0. 015| -| | 0. 015| 9. 900| 0. 149| Onion| Kg| 0. 200| 20%| (0. 200/80)x100| 0. 250| 4. 800| 1. 200| Beer| Ltr| 0. 360| -| -| 0. 360| 6. 000| 2. 160| Beef broth| Ltr| 0. 520| -| -| 0. 520| 40. 11| 20. 857| Brown gravy mix| Kg| 0. 034| -| -| 0. 034| 26. 08| 0. 886| Carrots| Kg| 0. 496| 20%| (0. 496/80)x100| 0. 620| 2. 300| 1. 426| Chinese cabbage| Kg| 0. 496| -| -| 0. 496| 1. 950| 0. 67| Pepper| Kg| 0. 005| 15%| (0. 005/85)x100| 0. 006| 32. 750| 0. 196| Parsley| Kg| 0. 120| -| -| 0. 120| 7. 800| 0. 936| | | | | | | Total| 62. 577| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 19. 00| Method: 1. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a large saucepan. 2. Add lamb cubes and onion. Cook and stir in the hot oil until lamb is brown; drain off fat. 3. Stir in beer (or water) and seasoned pepper. 4. Bring to boiling; reduce heat and cover and simmer for 45 minutes. 5. Stir in beef broth and gravy mix. 6. Add potatoes and carrots. Cover and simmer for 15 to so minutes or until vegetables are tender 7.

Stir in cabbage and cook just until the cabbage turns bright green. 8. Ladle into soup bowls and sprinkle with parsley. | Standard:| (Patrick’s Irish Lamb Soup, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Mussels in Murphy’s Irish Stout Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Mussels| Kg| 2. 700| -| -| 2. 700| 12. 500| 33. 750| Butter| Ltr| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 9. 700| 0. 582| Onion| Kg| 0. 005| 10%| (0. 005/90)x100| 0. 006| 4. 800| 0. 028| Parsley| Kg| 0. 030| -| -| 0. 030| 7. 00| 0. 234| Seasoning | -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| | | | | | | Total| 34. 594| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 10. 50| Method: 1. Clean the mussels. 2. Melt the butter in a large pan. 3. Add the onions and cook for 2 to 3 minutes. 4. Add the other ingredients, cover with lid and boil; shake the pan from time to time, until the mussels steam open. 5. Serve with more butter and parsley. Parsley 1 for cooking and 1 for garnish. 6. Offer plenty of bread for mopping up sauce. | Standard:| (Bantry Bay in May – World Cultures European, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Potato Crusted Oysters Starter ?

Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Oysters| Kg| 1. 200| -| -| 1. 200| 31. 500| 37. 800| Eggs| pce| 5. 000| -| -| 5. 000| 0. 012| 0. 060| Water| x1| 0. 015| -| -| -| -| -| Flour| Kg| 0. 120| -| -| 0. 120| 1. 360| 0. 163| Potatoes| Kg| 0. 120| 25%| (0. 120/75)x100| 0. 160| 2. 400| 0. 384| Butter| Kg| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 9. 700| 0. 582| | | | | | | Total| 38. 989| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 11. 80| Method: 1. Carefully shuck the oysters, remove the meat, and discard the upper shells.

Reserve the lower shells with their cup-shaped indentations. 2. Pat the oysters dry on paper towels. 3. Beat together the egg and the water. 4. Dredge the oysters first in the flour, then in the egg mixture, and finally in the potato flakes. 5. In a nonstick saute pan, heat the butter until it is sizzling. 6. Quickly add the oysters and brown them first on one side, then the other. Remove them from the pan, and place them on a paper towel for a moment. Transfer the oysters to their shells and serve immediately. | Standard:| (Potato Crusted Oysters, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant

Menu: Shrimp with Steel Cut Irish Oats and Saffron Beurre Blanc Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Shrimp| Kg| 1. 150| 15%| (1. 150/85)x100| 1. 353| 24. 800| 33. 550| Vegetable oil| Ltr| 0. 015| -| -| 0. 015| 3. 100| 0. 047| Butter| Kg| 0. 015| -| -| 0. 015| 9. 700| 0. 146| Shallot| Kg| 0. 350| 10%| (0. 350/90)x100| 0. 389| 4. 900| 1. 906| Rice Vinegar| Ltr| 0. 100| -| -| 0. 100| 13. 99| 1. 399| Saffron| Kg| 0. 720| -| -| 0. 720| 12. 19| 8. 776| Olive Oil| Ltr| 0. 045| -| -| 0. 045| 9. 900| 0. 45| McCann’s Steel Irish Oats| Kg| 0. 240| -| -| 0. 240| 46. 330| 11. 119| Salt| x1| 0. 075| -| -| -| -| -| Pepper| Kg| 0. 005| 15%| (0. 005/85)x100| 0. 006| 32. 750| 0. 196| Greek Fage Yogurt| Ltr| 0. 120| -| -| 0. 120| 1. 200| 0. 144| Goat Cheese| Kg| 0. 120| -| -| 0. 120| 32. 800| 3. 936| | | | | | | Total| 61. 664| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 18. 70| Method: 1. Oats: Bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Add Olive Oil and bay leaves. Pour in 1 cup of Steel Cut Oats. Continue at a rolling boil until the water begins to thicken. Once the water is viscous, adjust the flame and continue at a low simmer for 15-20 minutes.

While the oats are cooking add the pinch of saffron to warm water and let soak for 5 minutes. Dice up red peppers and slice the scallions. Once the oats are thickened and most of the water has reduced. Take the oats off the heat and add vinegar, Sriracha, yogurt, cheese, peppers, scallions and salt if needed. Taste and adjust. Set aside and keep warm. 2. Beurre Blanc: Add saffron to warm water and let soak. Place shallots, vinegar, bay leaf and wine into a skillet and reduce. Once the mixture has reduced to nearly syrup, take skillet off the heat and whisk in the cold butter a little at a time.

Add saffron and continue to whisk until everything is incorporated. Strain through a fine mesh sieve. Keep warm. 3. Shrimp: Sub scallops for shrimp if the scallops are fresher. Devein and shell your shrimp. Keep the shells. Heat a skillet with 1 table of butter and 1 table of vegetable oil. Saute shrimp with the shells. Shrimp cook quickly so this should be no longer than 5 minutes or so depending on how thick your shrimp are. Remove shrimp and shells separately. 4. Reheat oats, plate shrimp and drizzle the Beurre Blanc around masterpiece. | Standard:| (Shrimp with Steel Cut Irish Oats, 2008) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant

Menu: Grilled Atlantic Salmon Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Atlantic Salmon Steak| Kg| 0. 970| 35%| (0. 970/65)x100| 1. 492| 32. 000| 47. 744| Olive Oil| Ltr| 0. 015| -| -| 0. 015| 9. 900| 0. 149| Pepper| Kg| 0. 005| 15%| (0. 005/85)x100| 0. 006| 32. 750| 0. 196| Mint| Kg| 0. 130| -| -| 0. 130| 17. 500| 2. 275| Coriander| Kg| 0. 130| -| -| 0. 130| 17. 500| 2. 275| Shallot| Kg| 0. 350| 10%| (0. 350/90)x100| 0. 389| 4. 900| 1. 906| Cucumber| pcs| 5| 5%| (5. 000/95)x100| 5. 63| 1. 700| 8. 947| Red wine vinegar| Ltr| 0. 150| -| -| 0. 150| 31. 510| 4. 726| Sugar| Kg| 0. 070| -| -| 0. 070| 1. 200| 0. 084| | | | | | | Total| 68. 302| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 20. 70| Method: 1. Splash a little olive oil on the skin of the salmon, season with salt and place it straight onto a hot grill, skin side down. 2. Cook about four to five minutes on the first side, turn and cook a further two minutes on the other side. 3. Rest a couple of minutes. 4. To make the dressing, place the mint, coriander, shallot, a pinch of salt and the cucumber in a mortar and pestle and crush lightly. . Add the red wine vinegar, two Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, caster sugar, shallots and plenty of pepper. 6. Leave the dressing to develop in flavor for 10 minutes. | Standard:| (Perry, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Beef Braised in Guinness Stout Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Braised Beef:| Beef (for stew)| Kg| 1. 700| -| -| 1. 700| 25. 200| 42. 840| Carrots| Kg| 0. 568| 20%| (0. 568/80)x100| 0. 709| 2. 300| 1. 630| Onions| Kg| 0. 500| 10%| -| 0. 56| 4. 800| 2. 670| All-purpose flour| Kg| 0. 075| -| -| 0. 075| 0. 450| 0. 030| Salt| | x1| -| -| -| -| -| Pepper| | x1| -| -| -| -| -| Olive oil| Ltr| 0. 113| -| -| 0. 113| 9. 900| 1. 119| Minced fresh basil| Kg| 0. 001| 20%| -| 0. 001| 17. 500| 0. 020| Guinness| Ltr| 0. 400| -| -| 0. 400| 4. 200| 1. 680| Honey| Ltr| 0. 013| -| -| 0. 013| 19. 99| 0. 259| Beef Stock:| Beef bone| Kg| 0. 907| -| -| 0. 907| 4. 700| 4. 260| Carrots| Kg| 0. 300| 20%| (0. 300/80)x100| 0. 375| 2. 300| 0. 860| Celery| Kg| 0. 100| 20%| (0. 100/80)x100| 0. 125| 3. 900| 0. 490| Garlic| Kg| 0. 005| 5%| (0. 005/95)x100| 0. 05| 5. 500| 0. 030| Salt| | x1| -| -| -| -| -| Parsley| Kg| 0. 096| 20%| (0. 096/80)x100| 0. 120| 7. 800| 0. 940| Thyme leaves| Kg| 0. 002| -| -| 0. 002| 16. 750| 0. 030| Onion| Kg| 0. 150| 10%| (0. 150/90)x100| 0. 167| 4. 800| 0. 800| Tomatoes| Kg| 0. 450| 5%| (0. 450/95)x100| 0. 474| 2. 900| 1. 370| Bay leave| Kg| 0. 001| -| -| 0. 001| 17. 500| 0. 020| Water| | x1| -| -| -| -| -| | | | | | | Total| 59. 048| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 17. 90| Method: Braised Beef 1. Cut beef into chunks. 2. Peel and chop the onions; peel and slice carrots into pieces about the size of your little finger. . Heat the oil and cook the onions until they are soft. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a large, shallow, oven-proof dish. 4. Toss the beef in the flour and brown quickly in the hot fat. 5. Remove the beef and place on top of the onions. Arrange the carrots around the beef. 6. If necessary, add a little more fat to the pan and stir in the left-over seasoned flour. Cook for a minute or two, stirring constantly. 7. Add the basil and the Guinness. Allow to cook for another minute or two and then add the honey and the stock. Again, bring to a boil and then pour over the beef, carrots and onions. 8.

Cover with a lid or foil and cook in a 325 degree oven for about 1 1/2 hours. 9. At serving time, sprinkle with chopped parsley. Beef Stock 1. Place all bones in a large roasting pan and roast at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. 2. Stir well, then add carrots, celery and onions and roast for 45-60 minutes longer, until bones are very deep brown, stirring mixture occasionally. 3. Place roasted ingredients into a 8-quart stockpot. Spoon off fat from liquid in the roasting pan, then add 2 cups water to the drippings in roasting pan and heat and scrape to loosen any browned drippings. 4. Add to pot along with remaining 8 cups water.

Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer partially covered for 1/2 hour. 5. Skim off any residue that rises to the surface. Add remaining ingredients and simmer partially covered for 5 hours. 6. Remove bones. 7. Strain broth and add more salt, if needed. 8. Cool uncovered in refrigerator. 9. Skim fat from broth before using. This stock will keep for 3 days in the refrigerator, or will freeze up to 6 months. You can freeze it in ice cube trays, then pop out of the trays and store in a zip lock freezer bag. | Standard: This stew reheats well. You may need to add more sugar to the recipe if you find it a little bitter. (Walter, 2007) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Misty Irish Steak (Winter Menu: December to February) Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Sirloin steaks| Kg| 1. 800| -| -| 1. 800| 44. 000| 79. 200| Salt| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Coarse pepper| -| x1| -| -| | -| -| Butter| Kg| 0. 112| -| -| 0. 112| 9. 700| 1. 086| Heavy cream| Ltr| 0. 250| -| -| 0. 250| 2. 100| 0. 525| Irish Mist Liqueur| Ltr| 0. 063| -| -| 0. 063| 26. 200| 1. 651| | | | | | | Total| 82. 44| | | | | | Selling Price(1 Pax)| 25. 00| Method: 1. Season the steak with salt and pepper. 2. In a large skillet melt 1/4 c. of butter over medium heat. 3. Add 4 steaks and cook for 4 minutes or longer on each side. 4. Place on a warm platter. 5. Repeat with the remaining steaks. 6. Add the cream to the juice in the pan, and stir until blended. 7. Add the liqueur and stir until blended. 8. Pour the sauce over the steaks. | Standard:| (Beef Steak Recipes for Dinner or Lunch, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Beef and Cabbage Rolls with Spicy Brown Mustard (Spring Menu: March to May)

Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert ? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| TrimLoss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Cabbage| Kg| 0. 021| -| -| 0. 021| 1. 950| 0. 041| Beef| Kg| 0. 453| -| -| 0. 453| 44. 000| 19. 932| Onion| Kg| 0. 025| 10%| (0. 025/90)x100| 0. 027| 4. 800| 0. 130| Celery| Kg| 0. 015| 20%| (0. 015/80)x100| | 3. 900| 0. 070| Egg| pcs| 1. 000| -| -| 1. 000| 0. 012| 0. 012| Brown rice| Kg| 0. 146| -| -| 0. 146| 40. 400| 5. 898| Spicy Brown Mustard| Kg| 0. 030| -| -| 0. 030| 28. 250| 0. 848| Beef bouillon| Kg| 0. 013| -| -| 0. 13| 34. 060| 0. 443| Beer| Ltr| 0. 100| -| -| 0. 100| 6. 000| 0. 600| Vegetable oil| Ltr| 0. 013| -| -| 0. 013| 9. 900| 0. 129| Flour| Kg| 0. 006| -| -| 0. 006| 1. 360| 0. 008| | | | | | | Total| 28. 110| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 8. 50| Method: 1. Remove 10 outside leaves of cabbage; cut and remove thick core of each leaf. Branch leaves in boiling water about 1 minute or until limp; drain. 2. Chop cooked corn beef in food processor. Remove meat and process onion and celery until finely chopped. 3. In bowl, combine eggs, cooked rice, mustard, corned beef, onion and celery.

Spoon about one-half cup coned beef mixture on the rib end of each cabbage leaf. 4. Roll up the leaf and tuck in the ends. Arrange seam-side down in a 13 x 9-inch baking pan. 5. Preheat oven to 190 C. 6. Dissolve bouillon in boiling water and combine with the beer in a bowl. 7. Pour over stuffed cabbage and cover. Bake about 1 hour or until tender. 8. Heat oil in skillet, stir in flour; and then 1 cup of the broth from the baked cabbage rolls. Stir until thickened. 9. Arrange cabbage rolls on a platter, spoon sauce over all. Serve hot with Spicy Brown Mustard. Spicy Brown Mustard 1.

In a blender, combine 2 tablespoons mustard seeds and one-quarter cup of red-wine vinegar. 2. Process until the seeds are partially crushed and form a paste. Let stand 5 minutes. 3. In a saucepan, combine one-quarter cup dry red wine, 2 tablespoons dry mustard, one-quarter cup of water, 1 teaspoon prepared horseradish, 1/8 teaspoon ground turmeric, 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves, 1 tablespoon brown sugar and the vinegar mixture. 4. Stirring constantly, cook over low heat 6 to 8 minutes or until thickened. Set aside to cool. Complete now or make ahead. | Standard: Cover cooked rolls and refrigerate for up to 24 hours.

Reheat and serve as directed above. | (Kitchen Recipes Irish Culture and Customs – World Cultures European, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Salad of Ardsallagh Goats Cheese with Rocket Leaves and Lisanley Honey (Vegetarian) – Side Dish Starter ? Cold Starter? Warm Starter ? Main Course ¦ Dessert? For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Rocket leaves| Kg| 0. 450| -| -| 0. 450| 1. 950| 0. 878| Ardsallagh goats cheeses| Kg| 0. 325| -| -| 0. 325| 24. 990| 8. 122| Honey| tbsp| 0. 025| -| -| 0. 025| 34. 990| 0. 875| Olive oil| tbsp| 0. 21| -| -| 0. 121| 9. 900| 1. 198| Salt| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Black pepper| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Lemon juice| Ltr| 0. 015| -| -| 0. 015| 24. 000| 0. 360| | | | | | | Total| 11. 432| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 3. 50| Method: 1. Divide the rocket leaves between 10 plates or 1 large, flat serving dish. 2. This is a flat salad so do not pile the leaves up. 3. Just lay the in a single layer on the plates. 4. Dice the goat’s cheese into about 1/2 inch / 1 cm dice, and sprinkle over the rocket leaves. 5. With the help of a teaspoon, drizzle the honey over the rocket and cheese in a grid pattern. . Follow this with a drizzle of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice. 7. Finally, season with a pinch of Maldon sea salt and a grinding of black pepper. | Standard:| (Uhlemann, 2006) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Guid Irish Cake Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| TrimLoss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Butter| Kg| 0. 232| -| -| 0. 232| 9. 700| 2. 250| Diced fruit| Kg| 0. 153| -| -| 0. 153| 18. 990| 2. 905| Eggs| Pcs| 4. 000| -| -| 4. 000| 0. 012| 0. 048| Baking soda| Ltr| 0. 004| -| -| 0. 004| 20. 80| 0. 081| Nuts| Kg| 0. 215| -| -| 0. 215| 6. 500| 1. 398| Lemon juice| Ltr| 0. 053| -| -| 0. 053| 24. 000| 1. 272| Sugar| Kg| 0. 012| -| -| 0. 012| 1. 200| 0. 014| Irish Whiskey| Ltr| 0. 240| -| -| 0. 240| 47. 950| 11. 508| | | | | | | Total| 19. 476| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 5. 90| Method: 1. Sample whiskey to check for quality. Set out a large bowl. 2. Check the whiskey again to be sure it is of the highest Irish quality. 3. Pour one level cupful and drink. Repeat. Turn on electric mixer, beat 1 cupful of butter in a large fluffy bowl, add one spoon tea of sugar and beat again. 4.

Make sure the whiskey is still okay. Turn off the mixer. 5. Break two legs and add to the bowl and chuck in the cup of dried fruit. Mix on the turner. If the fruit gets stuck in the beaters, pry loose with a drewscriver. 6. Sift 2 cups of salt-or something. Check the whiskey. 7. Sift the lemon juice and strain the nuts. 8. Turn the cake pan to 175 C. | Standard:| (Guid Irish Cake, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Irish Whiskey Cake Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| TrimLoss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Flour| Kg| 0. 40| -| -| 0. 540| 1. 360| 0. 734| Salt| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Butter| Kg| 0. 454| -| -| 0. 454| 9. 700| 4. 403| Sugar| Kg| 0. 397| -| -| 0. 397| 1. 200| 0. 476| Eggs| Pce| 5. 000| -| -| 5. 000| 0. 012| 0. 060| Instant coffee| Kg| 0. 137| -| -| 0. 137| 21. 54| 2. 950| Water| Ltr| 0. 215| -| -| -| -| -| Vanilla extract| Ltr| 0. 005| -| -| 0. 005| 18. 95| 0. 095| Irish whiskey | Ltr| 0. 260| -| -| 0. 260| 38. 99| 10. 137| Sour cream| Ltr| 0. 241| -| -| 0. 241| 2. 100| 0. 506| Sugar | Kg| 0. 314| -| -| 0. 014| 1. 200| 0. 376| | | | | | | Total| 19. 737| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 6. 00| Method: . Position the rack in the lower third of the oven. Heat the oven to 165 C . Generously butter a 9-inch Bundt pan, dust with flour, then invert it over the kitchen sink and tap firmly to remove the excess flour. Set aside. 2. In a large bowl, thoroughly whisk together the cake flour, salt, and baking soda. Set aside. 3. Cut the butter into 1-inch pieces and place in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix the butter on medium speed until smooth and lightened in color, about 2 minutes. Add the sugar gradually, about 1-2 tablespoons at a time, taking 6 to 8 minutes.

Add the eggs, one at a time, about 1 minute apart, scraping the side of the bowl as needed. Blend in the dissolved coffee and the vanilla extract. 4. Reduce the mixer speed to low. Stir the Scotch into the sour cream and add the mixture alternately with the dry ingredients, dividing the flour into 3 parts and the sour cream mixture into 2 parts, beginning and ending with the flour. Mix just until blended after each addition. Scrape the side of the bowl and mix for 10 seconds longer. 5. Spoon the batter into the prepared pan, smooth the top with the bottom of a large soupspoon, and bake for 1 hour and 15-20 minutes.

The cake is done when the top is springy to the touch and a wooden skewer or toothpick inserted deeply into the canter comes out clean. 6. Remove the cake from the oven and let stand on a cooling rack for 20 minutes. Invert the cake onto the rack, gently lift off the pan, and cool the cake completely. When ready to serve, dust with powdered sugar. 7. Note: If using the Midnight Chocolate Glaze, while the cake is on the cooling rack, make the Glaze. Place the cake over a rimmed cookie sheet, and glaze while it is still warm. If desired, after glazing, sprinkle the top of the cake with shaved chocolate. Standard: Store the cake under a glass cake dome, or covered with aluminum foil for up to 5 days. This cake may be frozen. | (Irish Whiskey Cake, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Irish Cream Cheese Cake Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| TrimLoss| Calculation| Order| Price (kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Graham cracker crumbs| Kg| 0. 227| -| -| 0. 227| 36. 910| 8. 378| White sugar| Kg| 0. 127| -| -| 0. 127| 1. 200| 0. 152| Melted butter| Kg| 0. 043| -| -| 0. 043| 9. 700| 0. 417| Cream cheese| Kg| 0. 495| -| -| 0. 95| 19. 990| 9. 850| Vanilla | each| 0. 056| -| -| 0. 056| 0. 940| 0. 052| Sour cream| Ltr| 0. 553| -| -| 0. 553| 2. 100| 1. 161| Irish cream liqueur| Kg| 0. 143| -| -| 0. 143| 15. 950| 2. 281| Eggs| pcs| 5. 000| -| -| 5. 000| 0. 012| 0. 060| | | | | | | Total| 22. 351| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 6. 80| Method: 1. Mix together cracker crumbs, 3 tablespoons sugar, and melted butter. Press this crumb mixture into bottom of 9 inch spring form pan with 2 3/4 inch high sides. Bake at 175 C until brown – about 8 minutes. Transfer crust to rack and cool. Maintain oven temperature. 2.

Using electric mixer, beat cream cheese, 1 cup sugar and vanilla in large bowl until blended. Beat in 1 cup sour cream and liqueur. Add eggs one at a time, beating just until combined. Pour filling over crust in pan. Bake until edges are puffed, and center no longer moves when pan is shaken, about 1 to 1/2 hours. Transfer cheesecake to rack, and cool 10 minutes. Maintain oven temperature. 3. Mix 1 cup sour cream and 1/4 cup sugar in a small bowl until smooth. Press down edges of cheesecake, and spread mixture on top. Bake 10 minutes. Transfer cheesecake to rack and cool. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Release pan from cheesecake. Cut and serve. | Standard:| (Monte, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Festive Fruit Platter Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Grapes| Kg| 0. 450| 10%| (0. 450/90)x100| 0. 500| 4. 700| 2. 350| Strawberry| Kg| 0. 480| 5%| (0. 480/95)x100| 0. 505| 24. 800| 12. 524| Melons| Kg| 0. 500| 20%| (0. 500/80)x100| 0. 625| 4. 900| 3. 063| Cantaloupe| Kg| 0. 500| 20%| (0. 500/80)x100| 0. 625| 4. 200| 2. 625| Apricots| Kg| 0. 00| 10%| (0. 300/90)x100| 0. 333| 5. 900| 1. 965| Kiwifruit| pce| 7. 000| 10%| (7. 000/90)x100| 7. 777| 0. 400| 3. 111| Sour cream| Ltr| 0. 240| -| -| 0. 240| 2. 100| 0. 504| Sugar| Kg| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 1. 200| 0. 072| Currants, red| Kg| 0. 060| 5%| (0. 060/95)x100| 0. 063| 4. 700| 0. 296| | | | | | | Total| 26. 510| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 8. 00| Method: 1. Seedless green or red grapes need cut into small bunches. 2. Honeydew melon, peeled and sliced. 3. Cantaloupe peeled and sliced. 4. 3 medium apricots, pitted and cut in half. 5. 2 medium kiwifruit, peeled and sliced. 6.

Prepare 1 pint (2 cup) strawberry, 1 cup sour cream, and 1/4 cup packed brown sugar. 7. 1/4cup Fresh white currants, desired. 8. Arrange fruits on large platter. 9. Mix sour cream and brown sugar. 10. Garnish dip with currants. | Standard:| (Fannie, 2008) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Irish Cream Pudding Parfaits with Oatmeal-Walnut Crunch (for Crunch) Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| Trim Loss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Old-fashioned oats| Kg| 0. 950| -| -| 0. 950| 6. 440| 6. 118| Flour| Kg| 0. 750| -| -| 0. 750| 1. 60| 1. 020| Sugar| Kg| 0. 600| -| -| 0. 600| 1. 200| 0. 720| Instant coffee crystals| Kg| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 69. 930| 4. 195| Ground allspice| Kg| 0. 060| -| -| 0. 060| 11. 990| 0. 719| Salt| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| Chilled unstated butter| Kg| 1. 100| -| -| 1. 100| 9. 700| 15. 73| Walnuts| Kg| 0. 563| -| -| 0. 563| 5. 990| 3. 372| | | | | | | Total| 31. 871| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 9. 70| Method: 1. Preheat oven to 175°C. 2. Combine first 6 ingredients in large bowl. 3. Add butter and rub in with fingertips until mixture forms moist clumps. 4. Mix in walnuts. Sprinkle mixture onto rimmed baking sheet. 5.

Bake until golden brown and crisp, occasionally stirring gently and leaving mixture in clumps, about 35 minutes. Cool completely. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Store airtight). | Standard:| (Irish Cream Pudding Parfaits with Oatmeal-Walnut Crunch, 2009) Concept Name: Irish Restaurant Menu: Iced Red Fruits with Hot White Chocolate Sauce (Summer Menu: June to August) Starter ? Cold Starter ? Warm Starter ? Main Course ? Dessert ¦ For 10 Pax Ingredient| Unit| Amount| TrimLoss| Calculation| Order| Price(kg/ltr)| Food Cost(CHF)| Berries| Kg| 0. 225| -| -| 0. 225| 68. 000| 15. 300| Rasberries| Kg| 0. 225| -| -| 0. 225| 44. 000| 9. 900|

Strawberries| Kg| 0. 225| 5%| (0. 225/95)x100| 0. 236| 24. 800| 5. 852| Red Currant| Kg| 0. 225| 5%| (0. 225/95)x100| 0. 236| 21. 820| 5. 149| Cream| Ltr| 0. 300| -| -| 0. 300| 2. 100| 0. 630| White chocolate| Kg| 0. 225| -| | 0. 225| 38. 660| 8. 698| Mint leaf| -| x1| -| -| -| -| -| | | | | | | Total| 45. 529| | | | | | Selling Price (1 Pax)| 13. 80| Method: 1. Heat the cream gently in a small saucepan and watch carefully. 2. Break the chocolate into pieces and add to the cream, stirring, until the chocolate has melted. 3. Remove from the heat, seal the saucepan with cling film and cover it with a lid to keep the sauce warm. . Divide the frozen fruit between four bowls or glasses and allow it to defrost slightly. 5. Before serving, pour the hot sauce over the fruit and garnish with a sprig of mint. The fruit should be slightly thawed and the sauce hot. 6. This is made by putting the one bowl inside another bowl securing, filling the gap between the bowls with water and freezing. | Standard: Remove the fruit from the freeze no more than 10-12 minutes before serving. | (Campbell, G. & Uhlemann, R. , 2005) | | HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedures Personal Hygiene PURPOSE: To prevent contamination of food by foodservice employees.

RESPONSIBLITY: The procedure concerns handling, preparing, and serving food practice by foodservice employees INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Employee training based on local health department requirements, guidelines of this SOP and Employee Health Policy. 2. Hands washed and fingernails trimmed. 3. Do not use artificial fingernails and nail polish. 4. Bandage wounds/sores/lesion and wear gloves when hands are bandaged. 5. Report to work in good health, clean, and dressed in clean attire. 6. Avoid wearing any jewelry. 7. Wear hair restraint when in kitchen. 8. Do not eat, drink, or smoke in kitchen. 9. Correctly taste food: Separate food for tasting * Taste food using a teaspoon * Wash hands MONITORING: Pick employee to observe other employees according to guidelines. CORRECTIVE ACTION: 1. Employee found breaching local and SOP guidelines must be retrained. 2. Dispense contaminated food. VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING: 1. Manager must observe employees and record delivery details. 2. Keep recording log for at least 1 year. Receiving and Storing PURPOSE: To guarantee fresh and safe food when it enters the foodservice operation and is properly stored. RESPONSIBILITY: This procedure concerns receiving and storing for all foodservice employees.

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Employee training based on local health department requirements and guidelines of this SOP. 2. Schedule deliveries to arrive at designated times during operational hours. 3. Organize deliveries to arrive at operating hours and record details of delivery schedule. 4. Mark food receipt based on either the date of arrival or use by date. 5. Compare order specification and product delivered. 6. Ensure food rejection policy is accurate, timely, consistent, and effective. 7. Organize and clean refrigeration, loading, and storage areas before deliveries. Calibrate and record equipment specification. . Wash hands properly and transfer food quickly by not touching food with bare hands. 9. Separate raw animal foods such as seafood, meat and chicken livers, from ready-to-eat foods like melons, corianders, parsley during receiving and storage. 10. Separate raw animal foods between themselves as well, except when combining them in the recipe. 11. Store raw animal foods on the shelves inside the refrigerator as per cooking temperatures with the highest cooking temperature being on the lowest shelf. 12. Certain temperature is required for storing each type of foods. Details are as follow: a.

Ensure vegetables and fruits are stored between 10 ? C and 12 ? C. b. Freezer foods should be kept between -18 ? C and – 20 ? C. c. Fish should be stored between -1 ? C and 1 ? C. d. Other meats will be stored between 2 ? C and 4 ? C. e. Dairy products such as goat cheese or cream cheese should be stored between 0 ? C and 5 ? C. 13. Separate unwashed fruits and vegetables such as grapes, strawberry and celery from the ones that have been washed and other ready-to-eat foods. 14. Only dry, cleaned and sanitized equipment and utensils are to be used. 15. Avoid touching certain oints of equipment and utensils such as the middle of the pan that will be in direct contact with food. 16. Locate food in covered containers or packages and store it in the refrigerator. 17. Allow the upper shelf of the refrigerator to be the cooling shelf for putting uncovered food containers during the initial quick cool-down process to help cooling effectively. 18. Clean the outer surfaces of all food containers such as cans or jars before opening. 19. Damaged goods will be located in a separate location. MONITORING: 1. Ensure clean, odor-free, organized delivery truck to prevent cross-contamination. . Check the interior temperature of refrigerated trucks and ensure that there is no sign of refreezing a. For fish and meat, and packaged products ensure temperature of 5 ? C or below. b. For eggs, ensure temperature of 7 ? C or below. 3. Check product details such as dates of perishable goods, integrity of packaging. Ensure shipping containers are clean. 4. Check details of delivery. 5. Regularly monitor food storage to prevent cross-contamination. CORRECTIVE ACTION: 1. Employee found breaching local and SOP guidelines must be retrained. 2. Separate the foods that are stored inappropriately. 3.

Throw away ready-to-eat foods that are contaminated by raw eggs, raw meat and raw fish. 4. Food rejection criteria: * Signs of refreezing. * Conditions of containers. * Expired or food that is not refrigerating at appropriate temperature. VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING: Manager must observe employees and record delivery details. Regarding storing issue, the assigned manager will observe if the employees follow the procedures and take corrective actions where necessary during the operation. Food Safety Checklist and shall be completed daily and will be kept for at least 1 year. Preparing and Cooking

PURPOSE: To prevent food-borne illness by setting a limit on the time allowed for potentially hazardous foods to be held in the temperature danger zone during preparation and ensuring that they are cooked in the right temperature. RESPONSIBILITY: Foodservice employees who deal with food preparation and cooking process. INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Foodservice employees shall be trained on using the procedures in this SOP. 2. Follow the Swiss local health department requirements. 3. Hands must be washed before cooking foods. 4. Use clean and sanitized utensils and equipments throughout the preparation and cooking process. . Separate raw foods from ready-to-eat foods in separate containers and use different utensils when taking the foods out of the containers. 6. Pre-chill required ingredients for cold foods, for instance sandwiches and salads to 5°C or below prior to combining with other ingredients. 7. Foods shall be prepared in small batches and close to serving times as much as possible. 8. Preparation time will be limited for any batches of food to avoid leaving the ingredients at room temperature for longer than 30 minutes prior to cooking, serving, or being returned to the refrigerator. 9.

Immediately chill potentially hazardous foods which are not being cooked or served after preparation. 10. Cook the combination of meat products at the highest required temperature. MONITORING: 1. Use a clean, sanitized, and calibrated thermocouple to take food temperature. 2. Take a minimum of two internal temperatures from each pan of foods at different stages of preparation by putting the thermocouple into the thickest part typically at the center (Avoid putting the thermocouple into fat or close to bones). 3. Check the time foods is in the temperature danger zone and make sure it is not over 4 hours.

CORRECTIVE ACTION: 1. Retrain foodservice employees that do not follow the procedures stated in this SOP. 2. Start the cooking process immediately once the preparation of foods (which need to be served hot) is complete and continue cooking until it reaches the required temperature. 3. Cool ready-to-eat foods or foods that can be cooked later quickly. 4. Return all ingredients to the refrigerator if the expected preparation completion time is to be more than 30 minutes. 5. Throw away any foods held more than 4 hours in the temperature danger zone.

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING: All foodservice staff must record the date, product name, commencing and ending times of production, the two temperatures/times/measurements taken, amount of foods prepared, any corrective actions taken on either Production Log or Cooking and Reheating Temperature Log where necessary. The foodservice manager will visually monitor foodservice employees during the shift to ensure that they follow the steps in the SOPs. Production and Temperature Log must be reviewed and dated daily at the end of the day.

Food Safety Checklist shall be completed by the foodservice manager daily and the checklist, cooking and reheating temperature log are to be kept on file for a minimum of 1 year. Serving PURPOSE: Ensure that all food is served in a sanitary practice to prevent food-borne illness. RESPONSIBILITY: Foodservice employees who deal with serving foods. INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Foodservice employees shall be trained on using the procedures in this SOP. 2. Follow the Swiss local health department requirements. 3. Hands must be washed before putting on gloves and every time the gloves are changed.

This applies to both during tasks changing and before serving foods with utensils. 4. Do not touch ready-to-eat foods by using hands without gloves. 5. Plates must be handled by the edge or bottom. Cups and utensils must be hold by using handles. 6. Store utensils with handles up to prevent contamination. 7. Potentially hazardous foods must be stored at proper temperature. 8. Utensils must be cleaned and sanitized before being served with the foods. 9. Utensils must be stored properly in a clean and safe area. 10. Put clear date marks and cool potentially hazardous foods.

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Irish Restaurant Concept. (2018, Sep 27). Retrieved August 21, 2019, from https://phdessay.com/irish-restaurant-concept/.