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Induction Standard 1

Standard 1 Role of the health and social care worker Your Name: Workplace: Start Date: Completion Date: Contents 1. 2. 3.

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4. 5. Responsibilities and limits of your relationship with an individual Working in ways that are agreed with your employer The importance of working in partnership with others Be able to handle information in agreed ways Questions CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One Standard 1 Role of the health and social care worker 1. Responsibilities and limits of your relationship with an individual 1. Know your main responsibilities to an individual you support Working in health and social care you will have many responsibilities to your employer and to the people you support. You may work with different individuals each with their own preferences, wishes and needs. You will find out about these by reading individuals’ care and support plans as well as communicating with them when you are together. It is important that you follow care and support plans and understand and respect what the individuals you work with say they need.

Skills for Care provide a Code of Practice setting out your responsibilities. These are some of the responsibilities you will have to individuals you support: ? ? ? ? Protect their rights and promote their interests Establish and maintain their trust and confidence Promote their independence and protect them as far as possible from danger or harm Respect their rights and ensure their behaviour does not harm themselves or other people In your role, you will also be expected to: ? Uphold public trust and confidence Be accountable for the quality of your work and take responsibility for maintaining and improving your knowledge and skills Your employer may have a set of values for the service you will be providing. Locate and read your employer’s values Think about how you will adopt these values You may wish to discuss your responsibilities and the values with your supervisor / manager Page 2 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 1. Be aware of ways in which your relationship with an individual must be different from other relationships You have a professional duty of care to the individuals you support which is different to the relationships you have with your friends and family. Your role is to guide and support individuals and to help them to live as independently as possible. You should listen carefully to individuals and never put pressure on them. These are some of the ways that you can maintain professional boundaries: ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Be reliable and dependable Do not form inappropriate intimate or personal relationships with individuals Promote individuals’ independence and protect them as far as possible from harm Do not accept gifts or money from individuals or their family members Be honest and trustworthy Comply with policies and procedures or agreed ways of working Cooperate with colleagues and treat them with respect Do not discriminate against anyone Maintain clear and accurate records Continue to improve your knowledge and skills Respect confidential information and knowing when it is appropriate to share Report any concerns you may have

More Information can be found in the GSCC Codes of Practice / Skills for Care website. http://www. skillsforcare. org. uk/developing_skills/GSCCcodesofpractice/GSCC_codes_of_practice. aspx Most of the individuals you work with will rely heavily on your support. For some individuals you might be the only person they will see during the day. Because of this, it is really important that you arrive on time. This will help individuals to feel confident that you are able to support them.

Your employer may have a Code of Conduct policy which will inform you of your professional boundaries. Locate and read your employer’s Code of Conduct policy You may wish to discuss professional boundaries with your supervisor / manager Page 3 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 2. Working in ways that are agreed with your employer 2. 1 Be aware of the aims, objectives and values of the service in which you work Every employer will have aims and objectives. For some employers, these will be documented and for others, they could be verbal statements.

Either way, it is important that you know what your employers aims and objectives are. During your induction period you will learn about your employer and how your role supports them to achieve their aims and objectives. This is important because your employer’s aims and objectives become yours while you are working and you will work together to achieve them. Find out about your organisation and your service’s aims and objectives Consider how your job role supports the achievement of these. If you are unsure, discuss with your manager / supervisor 2. Understand why it is important to work in ways that are agreed with your employer Policies and procedures or “agreed ways of working” set out how your employer requires you to work. They incorporate various pieces of legislation as well as best practice. They are there to benefit and protect you, the individuals you support and your employer. They enable you to provide a good quality service working within the legal framework and most importantly aim to keep you and the individuals you support, safe from danger or harm. Policies and procedures are essential pieces of information hat will support you in your role and will enable you to work professionally and safely. You are being paid (unless you are an unpaid carer) to do a job for your employer. If you do not follow their agreed ways of working, you could cause harm to yourself or others and you could find yourself subject to capability or disciplinary procedures which could lead to dismissal or even prosecution if you break the law. You do not need to know every word of every policy but you will need to know what policies exist and what they cover so you can refer to them when you need to.

Page 4 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 2. 3 Know how to access full and up-to-date details of agreed ways of working relevant to your role It is important for you to know where the most up to date written copies of policies, procedures, guidelines and agreed ways of working are kept that relate to your role. There may also be procedures for your specific work location(s). It is useful if your employers’ policies and procedures are published on their website as you will be able to access the most up to date copies at any time.

Policies and procedures are often made available for anyone to read as public documents because the Freedom of Information Act allows anyone to ask for copies, so it is often easier to publish them on a website. Sometimes policies and procedures are kept in a folder in the office. It is essential that you make time to familiarise yourself with policies, procedures and agreed ways of working as they will affect the way you do your job. Locate and familiarise yourself with your employer’s policies and procedures. Sometimes these might be less formally documented. In which case, discuss them with your manager / supervisor.

If your employer does not have written policies and procedures, it is important that you work closely with them to understand how they would like you to deal with situations. You will also need to make sure you are aware of the legislation and legal framework which will guide you through your legal responsibilities. There is lots of information on Skills for Care’s website to support and guide you in your new role. Skills for Care set standards for training and development including the Common Induction Standards that you are currently working on in this workbook and in your induction period. ttp://www. skillsforcare. org. uk You will also find information on the resources section on the CIS Assessment website: http://www. cis-assessment. co. uk Page 5 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 3. The importance of working in partnership with others 3. 1 Understand why it is important to work in partnership with carers, families, advocates and others who are significant to an individual It is essential that you work in partnership with all of the people surrounding the individuals you are supporting in order to ensure the best possible support and care is provided.

This will include carers, families, advocates and other people who are sometimes called “significant others”. In order to work well in partnership, there has to be good communication and you will need to have good communication skills. Advocates are people who support individuals and help them to explain and say what they want and need to maintain their wellbeing. They help to ensure the individual’s views are heard so their needs can be met and their problems sorted out. They can act as an intermediary when there is a difference of opinion.

Unpaid carers provide unpaid support to a relative, friend, partner etc. Significant others can be anyone who is “significant” to the individual you are supporting e. g. their partner, their children, a neighbour, their best friend, a priest, a guide dog. Other people may be able to provide useful information to support you in your work and you may be able to provide useful information to support them in being part of the individual’s lives. This is good partnership working. An example might be if there are communication difficulties.

A carer or family member can share information with you about how you can best communicate with an individual. This enables the individual to be listened to and supported in ways that they desire and choose. 3. 2 Recognise why it is important to work in teams and in partnership with others You will meet new colleagues and be expected to work in partnership with other professionals. Just like working in partnership with family members and unpaid carers, you can all work together, sharing relevant information with each other to ensure the individual receives the best support and care possible.

These people could be: Doctors Other Health professionals Friends and Family Personal Budget Brokers Nurses Social Workers Advocates Physiotherapists Occupational Therapists Voluntary organisations Unpaid carers Welfare Benefit Advisors Page 6 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One Independent Mental Capacity Advocates (IMCA) These are formally appointed specialists who can support people who do not have family and friends who can support them to make informed decisions and choices about the kind of support and care they need.

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 has a set of criteria to determine whether a person is able to make informed decisions and choices and if they cannot, this is when an IMCA is brought in to help. The Mental Capacity Act provides a statutory framework for people who lack capacity to make decisions for themselves, or who have capacity and want to make preparations for a time when they may lack capacity in the future. It sets out who can take decisions, in which situations, and how they should go about this.

The legal framework is supported by this Code of Practice which provides guidance and information about how the Act works in practice. The Code has statutory force, which means that certain categories of people have a legal duty to have regard to it when working with or caring for adults who may lack capacity to make decisions for themselves. This includes care and support workers and the Code provides guidance to anyone who is working with and / or caring for adults who may lack capacity to make particular decisions.

The term ‘a person who lacks capacity’ means a person who is unable to make a particular decision or take a particular action for themselves at the time the decision or action needs to be taken. You will need to learn more about the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and how this affects you in your job role. The MCA is also relevant to Standard 5. Outcome 2. 1. The Department of Health provide information about MCA on their website and you can also download a copy of the Code. This is the weblink. http://www. dh. gov. uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH _085476 . 3 Be aware of attitudes and ways of working that help improve partnership with others You will always need to make sure that you are doing the right things, in the right way, at the right time, for the right people, openly, honestly, safely and in a professional way. Learning from others and working in partnership is important. It will help you to understand the aims and objectives of different people and partner organisations as they may have differing views, attitudes and approaches. Page 7 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One

It is essential that everyone’s focus is on providing the best care and support to individuals, for example: ? supporting the individual to possible achieve their goals and be as independent as ? ? respecting and maintaining the dignity and privacy of individuals promoting equal opportunities and respecting diversity and cultures and values different ? ? reporting dangerous, abusive, discriminatory or exploitative behaviour or practice communicating in an appropriate, open, accurate and straight forward way ? ? treating each person as an individual utcomes for individuals sharing expert knowledge and respecting views of others to achieve positive ALWAYS FEEDBACK ANY CONCERNS YOU HAVE TO YOUR MANAGER / SUPERVISOR, EVEN IF IT FEELS MINOR TO YOU. IT COULD BE IMPORTANT EVIDENCE. 4. Be able to handle information in agreed ways 4. 1 Understand why it is important to have secure systems for recording and storing information. Current legislation requires everyone working in social care to maintain certain records and keep them secure. Different employers will keep different records and in different ways.

Most of the information is sensitive and therefore not available to the general public so it is important that information is stored securely so it cannot be accessed by people who have no right to see it. Information that is sensitive is called “Confidential”. Examples of confidential records are: ? ? ? ? Care and support plans Risk assessments Personal information about individuals being supported Personal information about workers Page 8 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One Find out what records your employer keeps and how they are kept secure 4. Be aware of how to keep records that are up to date, complete, accurate and legible. Information that needs to be recorded should always be written in a legible manner. Legible means clear, readable and understandable. It could be harmful to an individual if other people cannot read what you have written, for example in a care plan about the way the individual is feeling. Records must always be factual and not an opinion. They should include the correct date and a full signature of the person writing the record. It is also recommended to use black ink. Some documents will only accept black ink.

Information must not be crossed out or covered using correction fluid. Always record any information given to you by an individual even if you think it is trivial because it might help someone else. Always check an individual’s care and support plan before working with them as there may have been changes since you last worked with the individual, even if it was only a short time ago. 4. 3 Be aware of agreed procedures for: – Recording information – Storing information – Sharing information Records can be stored electronically on computers or as paper documents which can be typed or handwritten.

Computers must be password protected and it is recommended that individual documents are also password protected. Documents being sent by email should be encrypted and protected. Confidential paper documents must be stored in a locked cupboard or cabinet. Access to all information should be restricted to those people to whom the information is relevant The recording, storing and sharing of data is covered by: Data Protection Act 1998 Freedom of Information Act 2000 Caldicott Principles Page 9 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One

The Data Protection Act is the main piece of legislation covering recording, storing and sharing information. The main principles are: ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Be secure Be adequate, relevant and no excessive Be processed fairly and lawfully Be kept no longer than is necessary Be obtained only for lawful purposes Be accurate Be observant of a person’s rights Not be transferred to countries outside of the European Union The Freedom of Information Act says that most public authorities have a legal obligation to provide information through an approved publication scheme and in response to requests for information.

If you work for a local authority, your employer will have one or more specialists responsible for requests made under this Act. You will need to find out who this is and what procedures you should follow if a request for information is made direct to you. Caldicott Guardians are experts on confidentiality issues and access to individuals’ records. They can give advice on any concerns you may have about a case. They are senior people nominated in organisations who are responsible for safeguarding the confidentiality of individuals’ information.

Two key components of maintaining confidentiality are the integrity of information and its security: ? ? Integrity is achieved by the accuracy and completeness of information using proper processing methods. Security measures are needed to protect information from a wide variety of threats. The Caldicott principles and recommendations apply specifically to information that identifies individuals and emphasise the need for controls over the availability of this information and access to it. The six Caldicott principles are: ? ? ? ? ? Justify the purpose(s) of every proposed use or transfer Don’t use it unless it is absolutely necessary Use the minimum necessary Access to it should be on a strict need-to-know basis Everyone with access to it should be aware of their responsibilities Understand and comply with the law Page 10 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One The Information Commissioner’s Office is the UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, promoting openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals.

Their website has lots of information about recording, storing and sharing information under the Data Protection and Freedom of Information Acts. http://www. ico. gov. uk Your employer may also have policies and procedures or agreed ways of working explaining how data should be recorded, stored and shared. Find out what records your employer keeps and how they are kept secure 4. 4 Be aware of how and to whom to report if you become aware that agreed procedures have not been followed The paperwork you complete and things you record in your work setting might be needed as legal documents by the police or for use in court cases.

This is one of the reasons why it is so important to have good recording skills. If you use a computer in your role, make sure you know how to use the files and programs properly, including how to make sure records and emails are secure. There have been several high profile cases reported in the press over the last couple of years where people’s personal data has been mistakenly made public by negligent staff, for example, leaving computer records stored on a data memory stick in a public place in error. Computers and memory sticks must be secure and password protected and never left unattended, for example, on the back seat of a car.

If you become aware of any situation where you suspect or know that the agreed procedures have not been followed or are not being followed by yourself or another person, you have a duty of care to report the situation immediately to your manager or supervisor. Page 11 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One Questions: Role of the health and social care worker 1. 1 Know your main responsibilities to an individual you support What are your main responsibilities to the individuals you support and in your role? 1 2 3 4 5 6

How will you protect the rights of individuals and promote their interests? What are the values for the service you will be providing? Page 12 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One How would you use these values in your work with individuals? 1. 2 Be aware of ways in which your relationship with an individual must be different from other relationships How does your relationship with the individuals you support differ from your relationship with your friends? What could you do to maintain professional boundaries? 1 2 3 4 5 Page 13 of 19

CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One An individual you support says you can have their Tesco club card points as they do not have a club card themselves to collect the points. The points turn into free shopping vouchers. What should you do? You are beginning to have personal and intimate feelings about an individual you support. What should you do? 2. 1 Be aware of the aims, objectives and values of the service in which you work What are the aims and objectives of your employer? How does your role contribute to the aims and objectives of your employer?

Page 14 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 2. 2 Understand why it is important to work in ways that are agreed with your employer Why is it important to follow policies, procedures or agreed ways of working? What could happen if you do not follow agreed ways of working relevant to your role? 2. 3 Know how to access full and up-to-date details of agreed ways of working relevant to your role Where can you find up to date policies, procedures and details of agreed ways of working relevant to your role? 3. Understand why it is important to work in partnership with carers, families, advocates and others who are significant to an individual How can working in partnership with family members be of benefit to the individual you are supporting? Page 15 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 3. 2 Recognise why it is important to work in teams and in partnership with others Why is it important to work in partnership with other professionals? What is meant by each of these terms: Carers: Advocates: Significant Others:

IMCAs: 3. 3 Be aware of attitudes and ways of working that help improve partnership with others What can you do to promote good partnership working with other professionals? 1 2 3 Page 16 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 4. 1 Understand why it is important to have secure systems for recording and storing information. Why is it important to have secure systems for recording and storing information? Give 3 examples of the types of confidential information that are kept by an employer: 1 2 3 4. Be aware of how to keep records that are up to date, complete, accurate and legible. What are the principles of good record keeping? How would having an accurate record of what has happened benefit the individuals you support? Page 17 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One 4. 3 Be aware of agreed procedures for: – Recording information – Storing information – Sharing information What legislation covers recording, storing and sharing information? How can information stored on a computer be protected from being seen by people who shouldn’t see it?

How can paper based information be protected from being seen by people who shouldn’t see it? 4. 4 Be aware of how and to whom to report if you become aware that agreed procedures have not been followed Who should you contact if you are concerned that procedures have not been followed? Page 18 of 19 CIS Assessment Induction Workbook – Standard One Shall we find out what you have learnt? Now that you have completed this section you can have a go at the online assessment for Common Induction Standard 1. To do this you will need to visit www. cis-assessment. co. k and log on by entering your username and password in the boxes provided. You will then be able to select Common Induction Standards then Standard 1. Don’t forget to read the instruction page before you start. Once you have completed this assessment and had a discussion about the results with your manager or supervisor, you may want to do a little more learning and / or return to your results and record additional evidence. You can also print out the results pages (which include any additional information you have added) for your Induction Folder and CPD Portfolio. ttp://www. cis-assessment. co. uk Copyright note for Managers and Employers The workbook(s) can be completed online or on a printed copy. You can make any changes, deletions or additions to suit your circumstances. You can personalise the workbook(s) by adding your organisation’s name and logo. Please make sure that CIS-Assessment is credited for putting the workbook(s) together and providing them without charge. You cannot copy, reproduce or use any part of the workbook(s) for financial gain or as part of a training event that you are profiting from. Page 19 of 19