English III Research Paper Flashcards(Hurricane Katrina)

Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“Because of the magnitude of damage and failures in response that characterized Katrina, the emergency period extended over 6 weeks.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“Ideas for reconstruction began to circulate even within the emergency period, and serious planning efforts began 10 weeks after Katrina while restoration was underway.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“A review of the limited set of long-term case studies of reconstruction after disasters tells us that reconstruction takes a long time.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“Critics rightly note that the sequence of recovery processes can be uneven, that phases can overlap, and, most importantly, that different social groups, even within the same community, can experience the sequence quite differently.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“The sequence and timing of recovery is somewhat controversial, but it provides a calendar of comparative historical experience against which to gauge progress in the necessary phases of reconstruction.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the trajectory for full recovery is not promising.”
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Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“In its 288-year history, New Orleans has had 27 major river or hurricane-induced disasters at a rate of one about every 11 years.”
Kates, Robert William, et al. “Reconstruction of New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
“The response to riverine and hurricane-induced floods in the Louisiana colony was to build levees.”
Xiong, Xu, et al. “Exposure to Hurricane Katrina, post-traumatic stress disorder and birth outcomes.” The American journal of the medical sciences
“Women who had high hurricane exposure were at an increased risk of having low birth weight infants.”
Xiong, Xu, et al. “Exposure to Hurricane Katrina, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Birth Outcomes.” The American Journal of the Medical Sciences
“To prevent poor pregnancy outcomes during and after disasters, future disaster preparedness may need to include the planning of earlier evacuation of pregnant women to minimize their exposure to severe disaster events.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“A more plausible explanation is that the effects of increased mental illness after Hurricane Katrina on suicidality were offset by protective factors activated by the hurricane.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“Not withstanding these limitations, the fact that the estimated prevalence of serious mental illness and mild-moderate mental illness doubled after Hurricane Katrina is consistent with other evidence of the adverse effects on mental health of major disasters.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“Although this possibility has not been studied in previous trauma studies, post-traumatic personal growth in areas such as self-efficacy, optimism, hope and perceived social support have been documented after disasters, and these changes have been linked to low levels of post-disaster distress.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“Our findings go beyond these earlier results, though, to suggest that some dimensions of post-traumatic personal growth might be protective against suicidality among people with clinically significant mental illness.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“Research has suggested that public health messages play an important part in affecting psychological reactions to disasters.”
Kessler, Ronald C., et al. “Mental illness and Suicidality After Hurricane Katrina.” Bulletin of the World Health Organization
“The promotion of positive cognitions might be an important pathway for these effects.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005, on the Gulf Coast of the United States, causing loss of life, widespread property damage, and power outages.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“After hurricanes, some residents use portable generators and other gasoline-powered appliances for electrical power and cleanup.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“CO poisoning can be prevented by reducing exposure to CO through appropriate placement and ventilation of gasoline-powered engines.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“During August 29-September 24, a total of 51 cases of CO poisoning were reported by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) facilities in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“These devices produce carbon monoxide (CO), and improper use can cause CO poisoning.”
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina–Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.”
“This report describes these cases and the rapidly implemented reporting system that identified them.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“It has long been understood by disaster researchers that both the general public and organizational actors tend to believe in various disaster myths.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“Notions that disasters are accompanied by looting, social disorganization, and deviant behavior are examples of such myths.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“Research shows that the mass media play a significant role in promulgating erroneous beliefs about disaster behavior.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“Following Hurricane Katrina, the response of disaster victims was framed by the media in ways that greatly exaggerated the incidence and severity of looting and lawlessness.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“Media reports initially employed a ‘civil unrest’ frame and later characterized victim behavior as equivalent to urban warfare.”
Tierney, Kathleen, Christine Bevc, and Erica Kuligowski. “Metaphors Matter: Disaster Myths, Media Frames, and their Consequences in Hurricane Katrina.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
“The media emphasis on lawlessness and the need for strict social control both reflects and reinforces political discourse calling for a greater role for the military in disaster management.”
Brunkard, Joan, Gonza Namulanda, and Raoult Ratard. “Hurricane Katrina Deaths, Louisiana, 2005.” Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
“We identified 971 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana and 15 deaths among Katrina evacuees in other states. Drowning (40%), injury and trauma (25%), and heart conditions (11%) were the major causes of death among Louisiana victims. Forty-nine percent of victims were people 75 years old and older.”
Brunkard, Joan, Gonza Namulanda, and Raoult Ratard. “Hurricane Katrina Deaths, Louisiana, 2005.” Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
“Future disaster preparedness efforts must focus on evacuating and caring for vulnerable populations, including those in hospitals, long-term care facilities, and personal residences.”