Last Updated 07 Jul 2020

Character Analysis: Edward Scissorhands

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Some people are monsters by appearance and others by behaviour. The way people treat others often influences how they react. In this caseEdward was a kind To discuss the essay question it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the meaning of the word monster, The Collins dictionary defines it as an imaginary beast, made up of various human and animal parts, an inhuman person or a cruel and wicked person.

This certainly describes Edward Scissorhands and with this definition in mind it is easy to argue that many of the characters in “Edward Scissorhands” behaved in a monstrous way. Edward Scissorhands is a monster created by an eccentric inventor who unfortunately died before completing his creation, leaving Edward with scissors for hands. In a flash back to the scene were his inventor cuts out a heart shaped cookie and places it on the robot body it creates a pleasant image in the mind of the viewer.

Edward lived isolation in a Gothic Castle until he was discovered by Peg the Avon lady, she took pity on him and took him into her home. The suburb where she lived all of the houses are painted in pastel colours with neat gardens creating and image of a suburban wonderland, Edward appears as a very quiet young man with a child like innocence. So whilst Edward is indeed a monster by creation and appearance he is not so by nature.

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The neighbours behave in a way that could easily be argued as cruel and wicked, so by definition could be argued as monstrous behaviour. Edward is a kind and naive young man who is exploited by his neighbours who present themselves as friends but turn on him without question. Although the characters in the film are not deemed as monsters, the way they act makes them monsters. Their lack of understanding towards Edward impacts the way they treat him and in turn how he responds.

The neighbours originally reject Edward due to their ignorance, prejudice and lack of empathy. When they discover his artistic ability to clip dogs, trim hedges into various shapes and style the hair of the ladies he becomes the most popular person in town and everyone loves him. As quickly as the neighbours accept him they turn on him and reject him. Edward gets into trouble with the Police and the neighbourhood once again turns on him, the women are again outside gossiping about him and saying cruel things about him suggesting he is the “son of Satan”.

The main villain is the families neighbour Jim, whose hatred towards Edward is driven by his jealousy after realizing that Kim has a soft spot for Edward. Jim almost runs over Kim’s brother Kevin and Edward saves him, in doing so he accidently cuts Kevin’s face. The neighbours immediately without understanding the situation seek revenge on Edward and it is like a chain reaction with the whole neighbourhood turning against Edward like a bunch of vigilantes and violently rejecting him.

What makes the behaviour of the neighbours seem so monstrous is the impression of Edward being so naive, he was exploited by his neighbours and violently turned upon without question. In the end the main villain Jim meets his death and the scene has the neighbours still seeking revenge when Kim tells them that Edward is gone. There seems to be no emotional reaction from them again, an example of cruel and wicked behaviour. Edward’s death is almost a relief for the

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Character Analysis: Edward Scissorhands. (2017, May 08). Retrieved from https://phdessay.com/edward-scissorhands-113721/

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