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Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation

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Physics Lab Report Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation For Mr. Williams SPH3U1-02 Sept. 13/10 Written by: Dong Chang, Gloria Chan, Sanjay Tanirige, and Waleed Shehzad Image credits Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation Purpose The purpose of this experiment is to determine the amount of time in seconds that it takes to walk a distance of 84 metres on the running track. In addition, the person that is the most reliable to perform this test will have to be determined. Hypothesis We hypothesize that it will take approximately 103. 7 seconds to run the 84 metre of track by an average person. This value was derived from the average time that it takes to walk one metre from the person with the most average walking speed out of the group.

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Procedure Materials and Apparatus: • Metre Stick • • Method Part A: Finding most reliable walker 1. Place the metre stick on a sufficient space on the ground with some distance before and after it. Let the zero metre mark be the origin. 2. Start walking some distance before the origin (in the negative x-axis area).

When the person’s stride is over the origin, the stopwatch is started. The person will keep on walking and maintain the same speed and heading with no acceleration until they have walked some distance past the 1 metre mark. Stop the stopwatch once the person’s stride is over the 1 metre mark. 3. Record the time that it takes to perform the action of walking 1 metre. Repeat Step 2 two more times so that you have three trials. Find the average time that it took the person to walk the 1 metre. 4. Repeat Steps 1-3 for each member of the roup. 5. Find the average that it takes for all members of the group to walk 1 metre by adding their averages and dividing by the amount of people in the group. Stopwatch with accuracy of 1/100 seconds Pre-marked area 84 metres long Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation 6. The person that has the closest personal average to the group average will be the most reliable walker for the group. Part B: Finding the time that it takes to walk 84 metres 1. Mark the 84 metre track with the start and the finish. 2.

Using the most reliable walker found in Part A, start walking some distance before the start line in order to achieve a constant velocity and have zero acceleration. Start the stopwatch when the person’s stride is over the start line, and stop the stopwatch when the person’s stride is over the finish line. 3. Record the time that it takes the person to walk the 84 metre length of track. Observations Record of the amount of time in seconds for a person to walk one metre. Walker Time 1 (seconds) 0. 90 0. 93 1. 08 1. 28 Time 2 (seconds) 1. 23 1. 16 1. 10 1. 08 Time 3 (seconds) 1. 6 1. 16 1. 18 1. 18 Time Average (seconds) 1. 13 1. 08 1. 12 1. 18 Dong Chang Gloria Chan Sanjay Tantirige Waleed Shahzad Therefore, the total average of everyone’s time to walk one metre is: (1. 13s+1. 08s+1. 12s+1. 18s)/4 =4. 51s/4 =1. 275s ?1. 3 seconds The person with the closest personal average is Dong Chang, with an average time of 1. 13 seconds.

Therefore, he is the most reliable to run the test. Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation The average time of the most reliable person to walk one metre. Walker Dong Chang Time (seconds) 1. 21 1. 37 1. 19 1. 5 1. 17 1. 28 1. 18 1. 12 1. 21 1. 25 Therefore the average of the time to walk one metre is 1. 233 seconds. To estimate the time it takes to walk 84 metres: Let x be the estimated time to walk 84 metres x=time*distance x=1. 233 seconds * 84 metres x=103. 572 seconds x ? 103. 57 seconds Therefore we estimate it would take 103. 57 seconds in order to walk 84 metres. Actual result of test to walk 84 metres: 106. 75 seconds Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation Percent Deviation of Test [(experimental value – theoretical value)/theoretical value] * 100% [(106. 5s-103. 57s)/103. 57s]*100% =(3. 18s/103. 57s)*100% ?3. 07% Therefore the deviation is 3. 07% away from the hypothesis. Percent Difference of Trials (maximum difference in measurement)/average measurement * 100% [(1. 37s-1. 12s)/1. 233s]*100% =(0. 25s/1. 233s)*100% ?20. 3% Therefore the difference between the trials was 20. 3% Analysis 1. a) How did you choose the walker? We first had each person walk 1 metre three times each and timed them. An average time was assigned to each person based on their performance.

Then we found the average that it takes for all members of the group to walk 1 metre by adding their personal averages and dividing by the amount of people in the group. The person that has the closest personal average to the group average will be the most reliable walker for the group because they are the most average. b) How did you design your classroom trials? We placed the metre stick beside the straight surface of the wall so that the walker can walk perpendicular to it as to not have any change in direction while conduction the trials.

We set the 0 metre point of the ruler as the origin, and that was where we would start timing and we set the 1 metre point to where we would stop timing. The walker would start walking before the origin so they can maintain a constant velocity and have zero acceleration. When their stride is over the origin, we would start timing, and then their stride Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation is over the 1 metre mark, we would stop timing. We did this three times each for every group member to find who was the most reliable walker, and ten times more for the most reliable walker. . a) How did your classroom trials approximate the final verification? Our classroom trials help us obtain a proper hypothesis that was extremely close to our final test during the final verification.

By using mathematical models and calculations with real world small scale measurements, we were able to predict the outcome of the experiment down to approximately 3% off. However, such trials seem mundane for such a low scale experiment which would probably have been done a lot faster if the final verification was done earlier. ) Who was the most reliable walker? Why? Dong Chang was the most reliable walker because his personal average time to walk 1 metre of distance is the closest to the group’s total average to walk 1 metre. On average, the total group took 1. 275 seconds to walk 1 metre, with Dong’s time of 1. 30 seconds average the closest. 3. a) How accurate was your estimate? Our estimate was very accurate and only presented a 3. 07% deviation (see observations for calculations) from the final verification time. b) Area your results reliable to science?

Our results are reliable to science due to the good design of our trials and experiments. We had a 3. 07% error, which is less than the 5% that would deem our results acceptable to science. Conclusion In physics, motion is a change in location or position of an object with respect to time. In this experiment, the walker exerts motion in order to change their position down a track. We were able to estimate the amount of time that it takes one to travel a certain distance with a set of scaled down trials. Distance Time Walking Relationship Experimentation

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